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College of Agriculture

PAUL M. PATTERSON, Dean
WRIGHT AMY, Interim Ass
ociate Dean

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE prepares students for a variety of opportunities throughout a global food, agricultural and natural resource system by emphasizing living sciences and providing challenging science-based curricula. Graduates are prepared to become productive global citizens and to address the challenges of providing a safe, affordable food, fiber and renewable bio-energy system while protecting environmental and water resources. Many of the basic science courses taken in the freshman and sophomore years serve as a foundation for additional basic and applied coursework in a specific major during the junior and senior year. The college’s student-focused atmosphere fosters strong academic, engaged learning environments and student development around life-skills and international issues.

Curricula are offered in agricultural business and economics, agricultural communications, agronomy and soils, animal sciences, environmental science, fisheries and allied aquacultures, food science, horticulture and poultry science. The College of Agriculture also furnishes the subject matter training in agriculture for the curricula of biosystems engineering and agriscience education.

Employment opportunities for graduates with expertise gained in these majors are forecast to remain strong. A survey of recent baccalaureate graduates from the 2010-11 academic year conducted by 15 colleges of agriculture found the average starting salary was higher than previous years. Possible careers include: agricultural economists, agricultural engineers, agronomists, animal nutritionists, aquaculturalists, biochemists, biological engineers, biometricians, botanists, business managers, cell biologists, climatologists, educators, extension specialists, entomologists, environmental scientists, farm services, fisheries scientists, florists, food systems and safety workers, food scientists, golf course managers, poultry scientists, molecular biologists, plant pathologists, plant physiologists, quality assurance workers, rural sociologists, science writers, soil scientists, toxicologists, turf scientist/specialists, as well as the foundation for entrance to graduate school, law, and health-related professional schools.

Transfer Credits

Transfer credits for agricultural subjects not considered equivalent to those required in the chosen curriculum may be substituted for elective credit; however, duplication of credit will not be allowed. Equivalence of agricultural subjects will be determined by the Dean’s Office; however, students may also obtain transfer credit on the basis of validating examinations. Arrangements for validating examinations must be made with the academic dean of Agriculture in the first term of enrollment in the College of Agriculture at Auburn and the examinations must be completed before the middle of the second term. Transfer credit for courses which are upper-division courses at AU will not be accepted from two-year colleges.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine and Pre-Professional

Curricula within the college enable students to complete requirements for admission to health related professional schools. It is possible to gain admission to colleges of veterinary medicine or other health-related professional schools after a student’s third year of undergraduate studies. If students are admitted to a college of veterinary medicine or other professional program after the completion of their third year, they may obtain a bachelor of science degree in their selected degree program after successful completion of their first year in a college of veterinary medicine or other professional degree program. The specific graduation requirements may be obtained from a program advisor or academic advisor for the college. The minimum requirements for admission to most colleges of veterinary medicine and other professional programs are incorporated in the first three years of the options listed under the following curricula: animal sciences, fisheries and allied aquacultures and poultry science. (See also the curriculum in Pre-Veterinary Medicine in the College of Science and Mathematics and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences).

Majors

Agric Economics Courses

AGEC 3010/3013 AGRIBUSINESS MARKETING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027). Principles and problems of marketing farm and agribusiness products including marketing methods, channels, structures, and institutions.

AGEC 3050 FARM APPRAISAL (2) LEC. 2. Theory of land values; terminology, processes and procedures for alternative appraisal purposes; factors affecting value; and evaluation of appraisal methods.

AGEC 3080 FUTURES AND OPTIONS MARKETING (2) LEC. 2. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027). Functions, institutions, economic performance, and practices and procedures involved in utilizing futures and options markets to manage market price risks.

AGEC 3100 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (COMP 1000 or COMP 1003) and (P/C STAT 2010 or P/C STAT 2017 or P/C STAT 2510 or P/C STAT 2513 or P/C STAT 2610). Analytical methods for agricultural economics: for agricultural economics: spreadsheet applications, optimization, regression, budgeting, and risk management.

AGEC 3300 AGRICULTURAL POLICIES AND TRADE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2027 or ECON 2023. Public policies affecting agriculture. Theory and significance of international trade, distribution of production and trade, issues and policies, and influence of exchange rates.

AGEC 3920 AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP (1-3) INT. SU. Departmental approval. Practical experience with agricultural business firms and agencies including finance, farm supply, production, marketing and sales and government. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

AGEC 3950 CAREERS IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1) LEC. 1. SU. To develop skills to find a job and learn about career opportunities in agricultural business and economics.

AGEC 4000 PRINCIPLES OF AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2027 or ECON 2023). Economics and business principles applied to agriculture: business formation, composing and analyzing financial statements, financial analysis and decision-making functions of management, capital budgeting and investment decisions. (Credit will not be given to majors in AGEC, ECON, or business).

AGEC 4040 AGRICULTURAL FINANCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027) and (P/C ACCT 2110 or ACCT 2117 or ACCT 2810) and (STAT 2010 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2610). Economic problems and policies in financing agriculture.

AGEC 4070 AGRICULTURAL LAW (3) LEC. 3. Recognition of legal problems associated with property ownership, contracts, torts, financing, estate planning and environmental controls and restrictions.

AGEC 4100 AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVES (2) LEC. 2. Principles and problems of organizing and operating farmers' cooperative buying and selling associations.

AGEC 4120 ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Economic principles related to common property, public goods, property rights, externalities and resource scarcity and allocation applied to current issues.

AGEC 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (1-2) IND. Departmental approval. Individual or group projects with a faculty member in agricultural economics or agribusiness. May include research, data analysis or a combination of these. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

AGEC 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College Membership in the Honors College required; Topics in agricultural economics. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

AGEC 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (1-3) LEC. SU. Departmental approval. May be repeated with change of topic. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

AGEC 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

AGEC 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College Directed research and writing of honors thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

AGEC 5010 FARM MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MATH 1680 or MATH 1683) and (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027) and (STAT 2010 or STAT 2017 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2513 or STAT 2610) and (ACCT 2110 or ACCT 2117 or ACCT 2810) and AGEC 3100. Principles of economics applied to agriculture; uses of farm records to improve management of the farm; developing enterprise budgets and use in preparing a profit-maximizing farm plan.

AGEC 5030 AGRICULTURAL PRICES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (STAT 2010 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2610) and (MATH 1690 or MATH 1620 or MATH 1623 or MATH 1627) and ECON 3020. Functions of prices and principles of supply and demand in price determination for agricultural products and markets. Statistical estimation of price and demand relationships. Spring.

AGEC 5090 ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020. Supply, demand, future requirements and availability of natural resources plus institutional framework affecting and conditioning such use through property rights, zoning, taxation, etc.

AGEC 5100 AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027) and AGEC 3100 and (P/C ACCT 2210 or P/C ACCT 2217 or P/C ACCT 2810) and AGEC 4040. Principles and problems in acquiring or starting, organizing, and operating successful agribusiness; financial and operational efficiency; human resource and public relations; decision-making tools.

AGEC 5210 ADVANCED AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 5100 and ECON 3020 and MATH 1690 and (STAT 2010 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2610). Case studies, managerial economics.

AGEC 6010 FARM MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (COMP 1000 or COMP 1003) and ECON 3020. Principles of economics applied to agriculture; uses of farm records to improve management of the farm; developing enterprise budgets and use in preparing a profit-maximizing farm plan.

AGEC 6030 AGRICULTURAL PRICES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 and MATH 1690 and (STAT 2510 or STAT 2513 or STAT 2610). Functions of prices and principles of supply and demand in price determination for agricultural products and markets. Statistical estimation of price and demand relationships. Spring.

AGEC 6090 ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020. Supply, demand, future requirements and availability of environmental and natural resources plus institutional framework affecting and conditioning such use through property rights, zoning, taxation, etc.

AGEC 6100 AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027) and (COMP 1000 or COMP 1003) and AGEC 4040 and (ACCT 2210 or ACCT 2217). Principles and problems in acquiring or starting, organizing, and operating successful agribusiness; financial and operational efficiency; human resource and public relations; decision-making tools.

AGEC 6210 ADVANCED AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 6100 and ECON 3020 and MATH 1690 and (STAT 2510 or STAT 2513 or STAT 2610). Case studies, managerial economics.

AGEC 7000 ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (AGEC 6090 and AGEC 3300) or AGEC 6030 or AGEC 4300. Food and farm problems and related governmental actions from historical, political and analytical viewpoints. Welfare economics and other procedures used to evaluate costs and benefits of existing and proposed governmental programs and actions affecting agriculture, environment and the consumer.

AGEC 7010 ADVANCED FARM MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 6010. Advanced theory and application of farm management principle principles and economic concepts to agriculture. Planning, implementation, and control of various types of farms for optimum utilization of available resources.

AGEC 7030 ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL PRICES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 6030 and ECON 6020. Theory and measurement of farm supply, retail demand and marketing-margin relationships. Introduction to equilibrium-displacement modeling.

AGEC 7080 PRODUCTION ECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 6020. Resource allocation and efficiency of production in the firm, between firms, and between agriculture and other industries.

AGEC 7090 RESOURCE ECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 6090. Analysis of institutional and economic factors affecting use of natural resources including economic feasibility/conservation, benefit-cost analysis, environmental controls and other interventions.

AGEC 7100 OPERATIONS RESEARCH METHODS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Optimization techniques with emphasis on linear programming and its extensions applied to agriculture. General theoretical background and associated computational procedures are used for presentation of models and modeling techniques.

AGEC 7110 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2027 or ECON 2023. Conceptual and empirical analysis of economic development with emphasis on the lesser developed areas and countries. Analysis of financial and technical aid to other countries case studies of development problems.

AGEC 7200 AQUACULTURAL ECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2027 or ECON 2023. Application of economic theories and principles to production, marketing, and consumption of aquacultural enterprises and products. Role of aquaculture in economic development.

AGEC 7250 AQUACULTURAL ECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 7200. Application of advanced economic theory and principles of production, marketing, and consumption of aquacultural products. Analysis of comparative role and competitive position of aquaculture in economic development and resource allocation.

AGEC 7590 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL ECONOMETRICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MATH 1610 or MATH 1613 or MATH 1617) and STAT 2610. Regression analysis in economic research. Model specification and estimation plus introduction to detection and correction of violations of assumptions of OLS. Hypothesis testing, dummy variables, heteroschedasticity, autocorrelation and measurement errors.

AGEC 7690 MICROECONOMETRICS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 7590. The focus will be on implementation and interpretation, as well as on the microeconomic foundations of the econometric models covered in the course.

AGEC 7700 RESEARCH METHODS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7130 and AGEC 7590. Overview of the philosophy of science, detailed discussion of how various research tools are used to perform applied research in agricultural economics.

AGEC 7950 GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. SU. A forum for sharing research information and interaction on topics and issues of current interest.

AGEC 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (1-3) AAB. Departmental approval required; Individualized direction/instruction by faculty on research, teaching and/or outreach issues. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

AGEC 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

AGEC 8060 THEORY OF AGRICULTURAL MARKETS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 7590 and ECON 6020. Theory and methods for estimating complete demand systems (e.g., LES, Translog, ALIDS, and Rotterdam) for food products. Introduction to imperfect competition models.

AGEC 8080 PRODUCTION ECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 7080. Firm-level economics problems are extended. Consideration of the influence of risk on firm behavior; empirical analysis of theoretical problems; welfare analysis; technical change; impacts of research investments.

AGEC 8090 FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 6020 or ECON 7000 or ECON 7110. The course will cover current issues in the economics and policies associated with food, food production and marketing.

AGEC 8690 MICROECONOMETRICS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 8310. The focus will be on implementation and interpretation, as well as on the microeconomic foundations of the econometric models covered in the course. May count either AGEC 8310 or AGEC 8690.

AGEC 8890 TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL MICROECONOMETRICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. AGEC 8690. This course is meant to assimilate knowledge acquired throughout core coursework in the Agricultural Economics PHD program.

AGEC 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Agriculture Courses

AGRI 1000 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Provide information about the College of Agriculture and Alabama Agriculture. An emphasis will be placed on learning about the different departments in the college.

AGRI 1080 AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Introduction to agricultural communications and professional development as applied to the ag sector; overviews of common communication methods and possible careers.

AGRI 3800 AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Programmed sessions and activities designed to enhance self-awareness of leadership skills and enable students to become effective leaders.

AGRI 4000 AGRICULTURE STUDY ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Departmental approval. Study abroad programs with emphasis on agricultural topics. Credit awarded in consultation with departmental chair. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

AGRI 4920 INTERNSHIP IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATION AND LEADERSHIP (1-3) INT. Departmental approval. Supervised, closely monitored work experience in agricultural communications or leadership. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

AGRI 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATION AND LEADERSHIP (1-3) LEC. Departmental approval. Directed study in agricultural communications or leadership. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

AGRI 5840 ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. AGRI 3800. Critical analysis of theory and practice of contemporary leadership processes and principles of learning to lead through service.

AGRI 6840 ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Critical analysis of theory and practice of contemporary leadership processes and principles of learning to lead through service.

Animal Sciences Courses

ANSC 1000 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCES (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. The importance of livestock to agriculture and to the health and nutrition of a modern society. Livestock terminology, selection, reproduction, nutrition, management, marketing, and species characteristics of beef and dairy cattle, swine, sheep and horses.

ANSC 1100 ORIENTATION TO ANIMAL SCIENCES (1) LEC. 1. SU. An introduction to the departmental programs and personnel and how to make the most of the college experience. Breadth of career opportunities for animal science graduates.

ANSC 2000 COMPANION ANIMAL MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Practical aspects of behavior, nutrition, breeding, reproduction, health and management of dogs, cats and other animals generally considered to be human companions.

ANSC 2010 ANIMALS AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Ethical and scientific issues surrounding human-animal interactions and the role human-animal interactions play in modern society.

ANSC 2050 INTRODUCTION TO HORSE MANAGEMENT AND TRAINING (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 4. An introduction to the management, training, and enjoyment of horses.

ANSC 2150 SKILLS AND CONCEPTS OF EQUESTRIAN SPORTS (1) LAB. 4. Departmental approval. Basic management and care of animals used in intercollegiate equestrian and rodeo sports. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ANSC 2650 EQUINE BIOMECHANICS AND SHOEING (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 1000 and BIOL 2500. Anatomy, function and care of the horse foot; mechanical forces and joint/tissues health; hoof traits, quality and correction through shoeing.

ANSC 2700 VALUE-BASED ANALYSIS OF MEAT ANIMALS (2) LAB. 4. Pr. ANSC 1000. Comparative evaluation of body composition and application of federal grading standards to determine relative value and price of live animals, carcasses, and wholesale cuts.

ANSC 2710 COMMERCIAL MEAT MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. The importance of meat in the food service industry, including food safety, purchasing, cooking and meat in the diet. For non-majors only.

ANSC 2720 INTRODUCTION TO MEAT SCIENCE (2) LEC. 2. Foundation course on the global meat industry with emphasis on meat products, modern processing techniques, concepts of food safety, sanitation, inspection, grading and meeting consumer demands.

ANSC 2910 PRACTICUM IN LIVESTOCK WELFARE AND MANAGEMENT (2) LAB. 6. Pr. ANSC 1000. Departmental approval. Hands-on laboratory teaching applied management of livestock species, including horses, cattle, swine and small ruminants, using modern equipment and techniques.

ANSC 3000 HERD HEALTH MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANSC 1000 and BIOL 3200. The prevention and control of the major diseases of farm animals and the development of heard health programs.

ANSC 3150 EQUINE MARKETING (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 1000 and (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027). Practical concepts of equine marketing including evaluating the horse, assessing the market, targeting customers, and presenting the horse.

ANSC 3300 INTRODUCTORY LIVESTOCK EVALUATION AND MARKETING (2) LAB. 6. Pr. ANSC 1000. Comprehensive study of live animal and carcass evaluation techniques used in the selection and marketing of beef cattle, swine and sheep. The development of decision-making oral communication skills is emphasized.

ANSC 3310 INTRODUCTION TO MEAT SELECTION AND GRADING (2) LAB. 6. Pr. ANSC 1000. Development of grading standards and application of federal grades to beef, pork and lamb carcasses. Comparative evaluation of carcasses, primal, and sub-primal cuts.

ANSC 3330 INTRODUCTION TO DAIRY CATTLE JUDGING (2) LAB. 6. Pr. ANSC 1000. Theory and practice in the selection of dairy cattle based on visual appraisal, pedigree, and performance records. The development and presentation of oral reasons also is emphasized.

ANSC 3350 EQUESTRIAN COACHING (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 4. Principles and practices of instructing students on horseback, safety for horse and rider, lesson plans and class management, evaluation of riders, teaching riders with special needs.

ANSC 3400 ANIMAL NUTRITION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CHEM 2030 or CHEM 2070 or CHEM 2077) and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Departmental approval. Principles and practice of animal nutrition, nutrient contents of feedstuff, and diet formulation.

ANSC 3410 ANIMAL METABOLISM AND NUTRITION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CHEM 2030 or CHEM 2070 or CHEM 2077) and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Principles of animal nutrition and nutrient metabolism and a study of nutrients and their utilization by animals.

ANSC 3420 APPLIED ANIMAL FEEDING AND NUTRITION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 1. Pr. ANSC 3410 or ANSC 3410. Feedstuffs, diet formulation, and feeding practices applicable to the well-being and performance of economically important livestock and companion animals.

ANSC 3500 ANIMAL BREEDING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANSC 1000 and (STAT 2510 or STAT 2513 or BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003). Genetic and environmental effects of animal differences. Selection and mating systems used in the improvement of domestic animals with an emphasis on livestock.

ANSC 3600 REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 1000 and BIOL 2510. Comparative anatomy, physiology and endocrinology of animal reproduction; principles of reproductive biotechnologies used to enhance reproductive efficiency in mammalian systems.

ANSC 3610 ANIMAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 1000 and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Biology of prenatal and postnatal growth of meat animals, emphasizing muscle, adipose, and bone tissues from a molecular, cellular, endocrine perspective. Application of concepts to improve rate, efficiency, and composition of growth.

ANSC 3650 PHYSIOLOGY OF EQUINE ATHLETE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANSC 1000 and BCHE 3200 and BIOL 2510. Selection and development of the horse for athletic performance; exercising, training, and fitness conditioning for performance horses.

ANSC 3700 MUSCLE FOODS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 1000. Introduction to domestic animal growth and development, comparative evaluation of livestock and carcass composition. Biochemical and physiological factors affecting fresh meat and processed meat quality. Fundamentals of ante-and postmortem muscle biology, slaughter, processing, storage and merchandising of meat and meat products.

ANSC 3760 VALUE BASED MARKETING OF LIVESTOCK (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Livestock grading standards and their application to carcasses of meat producing animals, concepts and principles of marketing, advertising, promotion and sales of commercial livestock.

ANSC 3800 CAREERS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE (1) LEC. 1. SU. Career opportunities for animal science graduates. Identifying and investigating careers and presenting oneself professionally for employment or post-baccalaureate education.

ANSC 3840 STUDY/TRAVEL IN ANIMAL SCIENCE (1-10) AAB/FLD. Departmental approval. Concentrated study in animal production and management, equine science and the meats industry within the US or international locations. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

ANSC 4000 MODERN LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (ANSC 3400 or ANSC 3420) and ANSC 3500 and ANSC 3600. Overview of beef, dairy, swine and small ruminant production systems. Modern concepts, ideas, and methodology associated with the application of technology to reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, waste nutrient utilization, and management.

ANSC 4010 BEEF PRODUCTION (5) LEC. 4. LAB. 1. Pr. (ANSC 3400 or ANSC 3420) and ANSC 3500 and ANSC 3600. Overview of the beef cattle industry. Modern concepts, ideas and methodology associated with the application of technology to reproduction, breeding, nutrition, management and the use of facilities in a modern beef cattle enterprise.

ANSC 4030 DAIRY CATTLE PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ANSC 3400 and ANSC 3500 and ANSC 3600. Practical application and integration of nutrition, breeding, reproduction, selection, herd health, economics, and management for efficient dairy production.

ANSC 4050 HORSE PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (ANSC 3400 or ANSC 3420) and ANSC 3500 and ANSC 3600. Practical application and integration of nutrition, breeding, reproduction, selection, herd health, economics and management for efficient horse production.

ANSC 4070 SWINE PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 3400 and ANSC 3500 and ANSC 3600. Practical application and integration of nutrition, breeding, and genetics, herd health, reproduction, economics, housing and management techniques for efficient swine production.

ANSC 4090 SHEEP PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 1000. Application and integration of breeding and selection, nutrition, reproduction, health, and marketing to achieve optimum lamb and wool production in the southeastern U. S.

ANSC 4100 FARM ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (2) LEC. 2. Pr. ANSC 3600. Basic information on behavior, its purpose, and measurement. Examination of eating, locomotive, sexual, aggressive, territorial, maternal, and resting behaviors in cattle, horses, swine, and sheep.

ANSC 4150 ADVANCED SKILLS AND CONCEPTS OF EQUESTRIAN SPORTS (1) LAB. 4. Pr. ANSC 2150. Principles and skills utilized in intercollegiate equestrian and rodeo team competition and management. Issues affecting management, training, marketing, and promotion of animals used in equestrian and rodeo sports. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ANSC 4300 ADVANCED LIVESTOCK JUDGING (1) LAB. 4. Pr. ANSC 3300. Advanced course in principles and techniques of livestock selection based on visual criteria, performance records, and other advanced technologies. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ANSC 4310 ADVANCED MEAT JUDGING (1) LAB. 4. Pr. ANSC 3310. Practice in evaluation and grading of beef, pork, and lamb carcasses and cuts. Development of communication skills and exposure to animal agriculture through training and intercollegiate competition. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ANSC 4320 ADVANCED ANIMAL EVALUATION AND MARKETING (1) LAB. 4. Pr. ANSC 4300 or ANSC 4310. Live animal and carcass evaluation techniques used in marketing cattle, swine, and sheep.

ANSC 4330 ADVANCED DAIRY CATTLE JUDGING (1) LAB. 4. Pr. ANSC 3330. Advanced course in the selection of dairy cattle and presentation of oral reasons. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ANSC 4450 EQUINE NUTRITION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANSC 3400 or ANSC 3420. Principles of digestive physiology, nutrition, and metabolic disorders unique to the horse with special emphasis on nutritional needs of the equine athlete.

ANSC 4650 EQUINE REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 4. Pr. ANSC 3600. Reproductive management and application of modern technologies to enhance reproductive efficiency of the domestic horse.

ANSC 4700 MEAT PROCESSING (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ANSC 3700. Integration of topics in meat and non-meat ingredient chemistry and their applications to muscle food processing. Physical, chemical, and sensory properties of fresh and processed meat products.

ANSC 4800 ISSUES IN ANIMAL AGRICULTURE (2) LAB. 4. Pr. COMM 1000 or COMM 1003. Issues affecting animal agriculture, dealing with concerns of consumers and activists, involvement in public debate, and the political process.

ANSC 4810 PROFESSIONAL DISCOURSE IN AGRICULTURE (1) LAB. 2. Pr. COMM 1000 or COMM 1003. Methods for enhancing effective discourse concerning issues facing the livestock industry.

ANSC 4920 INTERNSHIP IN ANIMAL SCIENCES (5-15) INT. SU. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credit hours.

ANSC 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-5) IND. Departmental approval. Students will work under the direction of staff members on specific problems. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credit hours.

ANSC 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3-6) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ANSC 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANIMAL SCIENCES (1-4) IND. Instruction and discussion of selected current topics in Animal Sciences. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

ANSC 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

ANSC 4997 HONORS THESIS (3-6) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ANSC 5700 MICROBIOLOGY OF MEATS AND OTHER FOODS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037 or BIOL 3200. Microorganisms associated with meat and other foods production, spoilage, and safety with training in both traditional and modern detection techniques May count either ANSC 5700, FDSC 5700, ANSC 6700 or FDSC 6700.

ANSC 5730 SENSORY EVALUATION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. STAT 2510 or STAT 2513. History and methods of sensory testing of food products, factors affecting results. May count only one of the following: ANSC 5730, ANSC, 6730, POUL 5730, POUL 6730.

ANSC 6700 MICROBIOLOGY OF MEATS AND OTHER FOODS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 3200 or BIOL 1037. Microorganisms associated with meat and other foods production, spoilage, and safety with training in both traditional and modern detection techniques. May count either ANSC 6700, FDSC 6700, ANSC 5700, or FDSC 5700. May count either ANSC 6700 or FDSC 6700.

ANSC 6730 SENSORY EVALUATION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. STAT 2510 or STAT 2513. History and methods of sensory testing of food products, factors affecting results. May count only one of the following: ANSC 5730, ANSC, 6730, POUL 5730, POUL 6730.

ANSC 7010 STOCKER PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Graduate standing in Animal Sciences or Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, or permission from the department.

ANSC 7400 RUMINANT NUTRITION (3) LEC. 3. Digestive physiology, mechanisms of rumen fermentation, postruminal nutritional biochemistry.

ANSC 7410 NONRUMINANT NUTRITION (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Digestion, absorption, and utilization of macro and micro nutrients, nutrient interrelationship in swine and other non-ruminant species.

ANSC 7420 NUTRITIONAL TOXICOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. General principles of nutrition and toxicology applied toward understanding and managing livestock responses to toxicants in feeds and plants.

ANSC 7500 EXPERIMENTAL METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. STAT 7010. Research methods used in the animal sciences for the analysis and interpretation of data. Included are experimental designs and computing techniques.

ANSC 7510 QUANTITATIVE GENETICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003) and STAT 7010. Departmental approval. Principles of population genetics; gene frequency, biometric relationships between relatives, additive, dominance and epistatic effects, estimation and use of repeatability, heritability, genetic correlations, and breeding values.

ANSC 7600 PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANSC 3600 and BIOL 6240. Physiological, endocrinological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms regulating reproduction, with emphasis on mammalian systems.

ANSC 7610 PHYSIOLOGY OF GROWTH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BCHE 7210. Molecular and cellular basis of tissue differentiation, growth and development with emphasis on muscle, adipose and connective tissues and factors influencing gene expression controlling such events.

ANSC 7700 MUSCLE FOODS AND APPLIED MUSCLE BIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ANSC 3700 and BCHE 7210. Investigations of muscle microanatomy, biochemistry of muscle proteins and lipids, biochemistry of skeletal muscle contraction, lipid/protein interactions, antemortem and postmortem factors affecting fresh and processed meat quality; discussion of classic and current scientific literature.

ANSC 7950 SEMINAR (1) LEC. 1. An intensive scientific literature study and subsequent seminar presentation of selected topics in some facet of animal sciences (Animal Genetics, Reproductive Biology, Growth and Development, Nutrition, Animal Production, Equine Studies, Meat Science and Food Animal related Biochemistry) by enrolled students.

ANSC 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-5) LEC. Conference problems, assigned reading, literature searches in one or more of the following major fields; (a) biochemistry, (b) nutrition, (c) animal breeding, (d) reproductive physiology, (e) growth physiology, (f) muscle foods, (g) microbiology, and (h) behavior. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credit hours.

ANSC 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANIMAL SCIENCES (1-5) IND. Emerging topics in Animal Science and related industries. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

ANSC 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-15) MST. Research and thesis may be on technical laboratory problems or on problems directly related to beef and dairy cattle, sheep, swine, or laboratory animals. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

ANSC 8400 PROTEIN AND ENERGY METABOLISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BCHE 7210. Nutritional biochemistry of protein and energy metabolism of mammalian, avian and aquatic species. Concepts of protein turnover, nutrient-gene interactions, control of bioenergetics, nutritional assessment, nutritional quality of nutrient sources.

ANSC 8410 VITAMIN AND MINERAL METABOLISM (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Vitamin and mineral nutrition with emphasis on chemical structures and characteristics, metabolic functions, deficiencies and toxicity syndromes, interrelationships and requirements of vitamins and minerals.

ANSC 8500 LINEAR MODEL APPLICATIONS IN ANIMAL BREEDING (4) LEC. 4. Pr. ANSC 7510 and STAT 7010. Selection index and mixed linear model genetic theory for estimation and prediction. Equivalent animal models, properties of solutions, and extension of methods to consider genetic relationships, multiple records, culling bias and multiple trait evaluation. Current literature will also be discussed.

ANSC 8610 MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BCHE 7210 and BIOL 6600. Heterogeneity and plasticity of muscle as a tissue, ontogeny, differentiation, growth and regulation of metabolic and molecular properties of muscle fibers by innervation, usage, hormones, and artificial modulation. Evaluation of current literature.

ANSC 8990 DOCTORAL RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-15) DSR. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Crop, Soil, & Environ Sciences Courses

CSES 1000/1003 BASIC CROP SCIENCE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Agronomic principles of classification, growth, structure, and soil-plant relationship of field crops, with emphasis on influence of man and environment, and importance of crop production. Credit will not be given for both CSES 1000 and CSES 1003.

CSES 1010 SOILS AND LIFE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Science Core. Practical applications of important soil properties and their function in everyday life. Connections between soils and human life will be made. topics include food security, sustainable agricultural production, soil and water quality, and waste disposal.

CSES 1020 CROPS AND LIFE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Science Core. Essential role of crop plants to human life. Topics will include historical development of crop science, impact of crop science on human development, and major issues and problems facing modern crop science and technology.

CSES 2040/2043 BASIC SOIL SCIENCE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CHEM 1010 and CHEM 1011) or (CHEM 1030 and CHEM 1031). Formation, classification, properties, management, fertility and conservation of soils in relation to the growth of plants. Fall, Spring.

CSES 2910 TURFGRASSES: USES AND CARE FOR SPORTS AND LEISURE (2) LEC. 2. Introduction to the commonly used turfgrasses of the southeastern United States including of these turfgrasses for gold courses, athletic fields and home lawns will be included. This course may not be substituted for CSES 3150.

CSES 3100 SOILS IN AGRICULTURAL AND EARTH SYSTEMS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (GEOL 1100 or GEOL 1103 or GEOL 1107 or GEOL 1007) and CHEM 1010. The role of the soils as key components in changing earth and agricultural systems. Intended for those who will teach earth science at the middle school level. Credit will not be given for CSES 3100 and either CSES 2040 or CSES 3040. Spring, Summer, Fall.

CSES 3120/3123 PRINCIPLES OF WEED SCIENCE (4) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043) and (BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027). Weed identification and biology, methods of weed management and classification of herbicides and how they are used in weed control. Laboratory subjects are weed identification and sprayer calibration. Fall.

CSES 3150/3153 TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043 or AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043) and (BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027). The management of recreational and home area turfgrass will be studied including establishment and maintenance of turf and the effect of light, traffic, soil fertility and water on its growth. Fall, Spring.

CSES 3200 APPLIED TURF MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 4. Pr. (P/C CSES 3150 or CSES 3153) or (AGRN 3150 or AGRN 3153). Familiarize students with the operation and maintenance of the equipment used for turfgrass maintenance. Effects on turfgrass performance will also be covered.

CSES 3920 INTERNSHIP (3) INT. 3. Departmental approval. Practical experience under the the supervision of an approved employer and the department. Internship may be in the areas of production, business, turf or science.

CSES 3960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (2) LAB. 2. Departmental approval. Individual and group problems investigations in crop, soil or weed science. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

CSES 3970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) ST1. 3. New topics in agronomy and soils.

CSES 4200 SOIL JUDGING (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 4. Description, evaluation and interpretation of soil-profile characteristics. Fall. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

CSES 4210 ADVANCED SOIL JUDGING (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Pr. CSES 4200 or (AGRN 4200 or AGRN 4203). Advanced description, evaluation, and interpretations of soil-profile characteristics. Spring. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

CSES 4950 SENIOR SEMINAR (2) LEC. 2. This course will cover professional presentations, both oral and written, in the area of Agronomy and Soils.

CSES 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College

CSES 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

CSES 5000 SOILS & ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Role of soils in bio-geochemical cycling of major elements and compounds of environmental concern; interactions of pollutants with soils and aquatic and atmospheric environments; methods to minimize or correct pollution; risk assessment.

CSES 5010/5013 ANALYSIS OF PLANT, SOIL, AND ANIMAL DATA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MATH 1130 or MATH 1133) or (STAT 2510 or STAT 2513). Principles of data analysis based on real examples will be discussed. Topics include measures of central tendency, dispersion, confidence intervals, sampling issues, probability distributions, etc.

CSES 5020/5023 NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Lectures and problems illustrate principles of nutrient management as related to soil or growth media, plant, fertilizer practices, management systems and environment. Required for all students majoring in Agronomy and Soils. Spring.

CSES 5030/5033 ADVANCED CROP SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 1000 or CSES 1003) or (AGRN 1000 or AGRN 1003 or AGRN 1007) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043) and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Application and integration of principles from undergraduate agricultural, biological and physical sciences courses in management of crop production systems. May count either CSES 5030.

CSES 5060/5063 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY LECTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3200. Ecology, physiology, and biochemistry of soil microorganisms with emphasis on soil microbial processes that are important to environmental quality and soil productivity. Spring.

CSES 5061 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY LAB (1) LAB. 2. Pr. (P/C CSES 5060 or P/C CSES 5063) or (P/C AGRN 5060 or P/C AGRN 5063). Laboratory exercises illustrating ecology, physiology, and biochemistry of soil microorganisms. Credit will not be given for both CSES 5061 and CSES 6061. Spring.

CSES 5080/5083 SOIL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Soils as a natural resource for land-use planning; their use and management for sustainable crop production, urban and industrial development and ecosystem protection. CSES 5080 Summer. CSES 5083 Fall.

CSES 5100/5103 PLANT GENETICS AND CROP IMPROVEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Principles related to mendelian, population, and molecular genetics of plants including inheritance of qualitative and quantitative traits, and plant transformation. Improvement of crop plants including heritability, role of environment, pedigree selection, recurrent selection, the backcross method, and marker-assisted selection. Fall

CSES 5150 SOIL MORPHOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of soils are studied in relation to their distribution and classification for environmental, engineering and agricultural use and interpretations. Spring.

CSES 5160/5163 ADVANCED TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 3150 or CSES 3153) or (AGRN 3150 or AGRN 3153). Factors affecting the turfgrass plant as a component of a dynamic community. Influence of soil chemical and physical conditions, management practices and climate are discussed. Theoretical and practical aspects of turfgrass management practices are discussed along with design and construction of golf courses and other athletic purpose turf areas.

CSES 5180 SPORTS TURF MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 3150 or CSES 3153) and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043) or (AGRN 3150 or AGRN 3153). Design, construction and management of sports fields and the turfgrass cover on such fields.

CSES 5200 APPLIED WEED SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. SU. Pr. (CSES 3120 or CSES 3123) or (AGRN 3120 or AGRN 3123). Advanced weed identification, pesticide application technology, identification of herbicide injury symptomology, and develop of interaction techniques and problem solving skills for dealing with potential herbicide efficacy problems. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CSES 5300/5303 SOIL CHEMISTRY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). An introduction to the basic soil chemical properties of mineral composition, weathering, absorption, cation exchange, acidity, alkalinity, salinity and soil reactions with fertilizers, pesticides and heavy metals. Spring.

CSES 5400/5403 BIOENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3) LEC. 3. The role of bioenergy in reducing environmental problems related to use of fossil fuels and certain agricultural practices, and in addressing declining rural economies.

CSES 5500/5503 FORAGE PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Grass and legume forage crops. The crops are considered from the standpoint of (a) pasture crops, (b) hay and silage crops, (c) soil-improving crops. Spring. May count either CSES 5500 or CSES 5503.

CSES 5590 ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL PHYSICS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. This course is designed to make the students understand basic soil physical properties and processes occurring in soils. All concepts are based on sound physical and mathematical principles. May count either CSES 5590 or CSES 6590.

CSES 5960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Work under the direction of a staff member on special problems in crop, soil or weed science. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CSES 6000 SOILS & ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Role of soils in bio-geochemical cycling of major elements and compounds of environmental concern; interactions of pollutants with soils and aquatic and atmospheric environments; methods to minimize or correct pollution; risk assessment.

CSES 6010/6016 ANALY PLANT, SOIL & ANI DATA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MATH 1130 or MATH 1133) or (STAT 2510 or STAT 2513). Principles of data analysis based on real examples will be discussed. Topics include measures of central tendency, dispersion, confidence intervals, sampling issues, probability distributions, etc.

CSES 6020/6026 NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Lectures and problems illustrate principles of nutrient management as related to soil or growth media, plant, fertilizer practices, management systems and environment. Required for all students majoring in Agronomy and Soils. Spring.

CSES 6030/6036 ADVANCED CROP SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Application and integration of principles from undergraduate agricultural, biological and physical sciences courses in management of crop production systems. May count either CSES 5030/CSES 6030 or CSES 5033/CSES 6036.

CSES 6060/6066 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY LECTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3200. Ecology, physiology, and biochemistry of soil microorganisms with emphasis on soil microbial processes that are important to environmental quality and soil productivity. Spring.

CSES 6061 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY LAB (1) LAB. 2. Pr. (P/C CSES 6060 or P/C CSES 6066) or (P/C AGRN 6060 or P/C AGRN 6066). Laboratory exercises illustrating ecology, physiology, and biochemistry of soil microorganisms. Credit will not be given for both CSES 5061 and CSES 6061. Spring.

CSES 6080/6086 SOIL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Soils as a natural resource for land-use planning; their use and management for sustainable crop production, urban and industrial development and ecosystem protection. CSES 6080 Summer. CSES 6086 Fall.

CSES 6100/6106 PLANT GENETICS AND CROP IMPROVEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Principles related to mendelian, population, and molecular genetics of plants including inheritance of qualitative and quantitative traits, and plant transformation. Improvement of crop plants including heritability, role of environment, pedigree selection, recurrent selection, the backcross method, and marker-assisted selection. Fall

CSES 6150 SOIL MORPHOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of soils are studied in relation to their distribution and classification for environmental, engineering and agricultural use and interpretations. Spring.

CSES 6160/6166 ADVANCED TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 3150 or CSES 3153) and (BIOL 3100 or BIOL 6130) or (AGRN 3150 or AGRN 3153). Factors affecting the turfgrass plant as a component of a dynamic community. Influence of soil chemical and physical conditions, management practices and climate are discussed. Theoretical and practical aspects of turfgrass management practices are discussed along with design and construction of golf courses and other athletic purpose turf areas.

CSES 6180 SPORTS TURF MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 3150 or CSES 3153) and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043) or (AGRN 3150 or AGRN 3153). Design, construction and management of sports fields and the turfgrass cover on such fields.

CSES 6200 APPLIED WEED SCIENCE TECH (3) LEC. 3. SU. Pr. (CSES 3120 or CSES 3123) or (AGRN 3120 or AGRN 3123). Advanced weed identification, pesticide application technology, identification of herbicide injury symptomology, and develop of interaction techniques and problem solving skills for dealing with potential herbicide efficacy problems. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CSES 6300/6306 SOIL CHEMISTRY (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). An introduction to the basic soil chemical properties of mineral composition, weathering, absorption, cation exchange, acidity, alkalinity, salinity and soil reactions with fertilizers, pesticides and heavy metals. Spring.

CSES 6400/6406 BIOENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3) LEC. 3. The role of bioenergy in reducing environmental problems related to use of fossil fuels and certain agricultural practices, and in addressing declining rural economies.

CSES 6500/6506 FORAGE PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr., In major or departmental approval. Grass and legume forage crops. The crops are considered from the standpoint of (a) pasture crops, (b) hay and silage crops, (c) soil-improving crops and (d) energy crops. May count either CSES 6500 or CSES 6506.

CSES 6590 ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL PHYSICS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. This course is designed to make the students understand basic soil physical properties and processes occurring in soils. All concepts are based on sound physical and mathematical principles. May count either CSES 5590 or CSES 6590.

CSES 6906 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) DSL. SU. Conferences, problems and assigned reading in soils and crops, including results of agronomic research from the substations and experiment fields. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CSES 6936 ADVANCED DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) DSL. SU. Conferences, problems and assigned reading in soils and crops, including results of agronomic research from the substations and experiment fields. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CSES 6960/6966 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Conferences, problems and assigned reading in soils and crops, including results of agronomic research from the substations and experiment fields. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CSES 7016 ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Science of the environment and the role of soil science in the environmental arena. Important chemical, biological, and physical processes that influence compounds.

CSES 7076 SOIL EROSION AND CONSERVATION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 1. Mechanisms of soil erosion and sediment production; infiltration, runoff, and sediment transport in agricultural, forestry, and urban environments. Frosion and sediment control principles and practice. May count either CSES 6086 or CSES 7076.

CSES 7080/7086 EXPERIMENTAL METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. STAT 7000. Experimentation in the agricultural sciences including experimental techniques, interpretation of research data, use of library references, and preparation of publications. Problems, assigned readings and lectures. Summer.

CSES 7120 CYTOLOGY AND CYTOGENETICS (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003. Cell structure and function with emphasis on cell reproduction and factors contributing to the evolution of organisms. Fall.

CSES 7136 SOIL MORPHOLOGY, GENESIS, CLASSIFICATION (3) LEC. 3. Chemical, physical and mineralogical parameters useful in characterizing soil. Genesis; soil-forming factors and processes. Classification: historical development and present concepts of soil taxonomy. Department approval.

CSES 7140/7146 CHEMISTRY AND USE OF HERBICIDES IN CROP PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. CHEM 1040. Principles and use of herbicides in agronomic crops. Methods of herbicide application, including time, incorporation and formulation, the fate of herbicides in soil and the ecological impact on succeeding plant species. Fall.

CSES 7150 SEMINAR IN GENETICS (1) SEM. 1. Pr. BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003. Reports by students and staff members on current research and literature in the field of genetics. Spring.

CSES 7160 GENETIC DATA ANALYSIS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 5100 or CSES 5103) or (CSES 6100 or CSES 6106) and STAT 4020 or (AGRN 5100 or AGRN 5103) or (AGRN 6100 or AGRN 6106). Introduces procedures to study the genetic characteristics of individuals and populations. Computer models will be used to simulate genomes and traits. Application of quantitative methods to experimental populations used to plan breeding programs. Fall.

CSES 7170 ADVANCED PLANT BREEDING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CSES 7160 or (AGRN 7160 or AGRN 7166). Estimation and interpretation of genetic variance components, heritability, selection response, yield stability indices and their effect on choice of breeding method. Recurrent selection theory and breeding for resistance to plant stresses.

CSES 7180 CROP ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (BIOL 6130 or CSES 7250) or (AGRN 7250 or AGRN 7256) and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Analysis of structure and function of crop and pasture farming systems with emphasis on production processes and resource management.

CSES 7190 ADVANCED FORAGE MANAGEMENT AND RESEARCH METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Principles involved in successful establishment, maintenance and management of crops used for grazing, hay and silage, and research methods related to this field. Field trips will be made to research stations and private farms to observe management practices. Spring.

CSES 7250 CROP PHYSIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3100. Integrates principles of plant physiology, biochemistry, ecology, and genetics as they relate to plant growth and development and crop yield. The effect of management practices and abiotic stress on plant growth and development will be discussed.

CSES 7276 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY (4) LEC. 4. Pr. (BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027) and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Soil as a medium for microbial growth, the relation of microbes to important mineral transformations in soil, the importance of biological equilibrium and significance of microbes.

CSES 7286 APPLIED GEOSTATISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Application of regionalized variable theory to surface and subsurface landlords using semivariograms and kriging.

CSES 7316 ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL CHEMISTRY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CHEM 1010 or CHEM 1011) and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Study of soil chemical processes (sorption, desorption, ion exchange, precipitation, dissolution, and redox reactions) of nutrients and inorganic and organic contaminants in soils and organic matter.

CSES 7326 WETLANDS SOILS (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Application of regionalized variable theory to surface and landforms using semivariograms and kriging.

CSES 7540/7546 PRINCIPLES OF PLANT NUTRITION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CSES 6020 or CSES 6026 or (AGRN 6020 or AGRN 6026). Processes of nutrient flux to plant roots growing in soil. Chemistry and properties of soil in relation to the nutrition and growth of plants. Summer.

CSES 7550 SOIL AND PLANT ANALYSIS (4) LEC. 1. LAB. 6. Pr. CHEM 3050 and (CSES 6020 or CSES 6026) or (AGRN 6020 or AGRN 6026). Principles, methods and techniques of quantitative chemical analysis of soils and plants applicable to soil science. Fall.

CSES 7560 CLAY MINERALOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Crystal structure and properties of the important clay-size minerals of soils and clay deposits combined with identification techniques involving x-ray diffraction and spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis, electron microscopy, specific surface analysis, and infrared absorption.

CSES 7586 SOIL PHYSICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. PHYS 1500 and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043).

CSES 7950/7956 SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. SU. Required of all graduate students in Agronomy and Soils. Fall, Spring. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

CSES 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) LEC. Advanced topics related to Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

CSES 7990/7996 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Research and thesis on problems in the soil and crop sciences. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

CSES 8570 PHYSICAL SOIL CHEMISTRY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CSES 6300 or CSES 6306) and CHEM 6070 or (AGRN 6300 or AGRN 6306). Interpretation of soil properties and chemical reactions in terms of ion exchange, solubility diagrams, solutions equilibria, electrochemistry and electrokinetics of charged particles. Fall.

CSES 8580 FATE AND TRANSPORT OF CHEMICALS IN SOILS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. MATH 1720 and (PHYS 1600 or PHYS 1607) and CSES 7590. Transport phenomena in soils. Physical principles and analysis of the storage and movement of water, solutes, heat, and gases in soils. Spring.

CSES 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Research and dissertation on problems in the soil and crop sciences. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Entomology Courses

ENTM 2000 PESTS, PATHOGENS, PARASITES, AND PEOPLE (3) LEC. 3. Past and present problems of pests and disease involving humans and the food chain.

ENTM 2040/2043 INSECTS: AN INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Life processes, importance, and occurrence of insects.

ENTM 2150 FOREST PESTS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027. Insect and disease pests of forests. Recognition, biology, and fundamentals of management of important pest species.

ENTM 3040 GENERAL ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Introduction to the biology and diversity of insects. An insect collection is required.

ENTM 3100 APPLIED BIOTECHNOLOGY I (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 5. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and PLPA 1000. This course provides an overview of the basic cellular processes harnessed by biotechnology and an introduction to recombinant DNA and its applications. It combines lectures with labs to provide hands-on experience with molecular techniques, DNA cloning, and heterologous protein expression.

ENTM 4020 ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Consideration of the biological aspects, life histories and control of insects.

ENTM 4040 INSECTS AFFECTING HUMANS, DOMESTIC ANIMALS AND WILDLIFE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) or ENTM 3040. Insects and other anthropoids which attack animals or otherwise cause problems of public-health, veterinary, or wildlife importance.

ENTM 4150 INTEGRATED FOREST PEST MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 2150 and FORY 3100. Identification, principles of integrated management, and computer modeling of insects and fungi that attack forest and shade trees.

ENTM 4920 ENTOMOLOGY INTERNSHIP (5) INT. 5. SU. Practical professional experience under the supervision of internship faculty and/or representatives of state, federal or private agency.

ENTM 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ENTOMOLOGY (1-3) IND. Credit to be arranged. Specialized project or research on a specific topic in entomology to be conducted under faculty supervision. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ENTM 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

ENTM 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-6) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENTM 5010 ENTOMOLOGY FOR EDUCATORS (4) LEC. 4. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Biology and diversity of insects and related arthropods with applications for educators. An insect collection and an entomological exposition are required.

ENTM 5030 INSECTICIDES IN THE ENVIRONMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. CHEM 1030 and CHEM 1031 and CHEM 1040 and CHEM 1041. Toxic action and environmental fate of insecticides, regulations, formulations, application methods, insecticide resistance and research methods.

ENTM 5120 MEDICAL-VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and (ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020). or instructor approval. Students without the prerequisite ENTM course must be approved by the instructor or take ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020 concurrently with ENTM 5120. Survey of insects, ticks, and mites of medical or veterinary importance, emphasizing role as vectors of disease agents and the biology of pathogen-transmission cycles. Labs focus on methods of vector sampling and surveillance, identification, and case studies of special topics. May count either ENTM 5120 or ENTM 6120.

ENTM 5140 AQUATIC INSECTS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040 or BIOL 4010. Biology and ecology of aquatic and semi-aquatic insects. Laboratory sessions focus on identification at the family and generic levels, and experience in collecting and field techniques.

ENTM 5150 ARACHNOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040. Biology, behavior and systematics of all arachnid groups, with major emphasis on spiders and mites.

ENTM 5220 INSECT ECOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060. Ecological interactions of insects and their environment, with emphasis on is herbivory, predation, parasitism and mutualism, as well as population and community dynamics.

ENTM 5300 SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020. Departmental approval. Learn to use the tools of the taxonomist to identify common families of insects. A collection is required. Field trips will be taken.

ENTM 5330 INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020. Integrated management of insects by environmental, biological, genetic, chemical and legal means.

ENTM 5340 URBAN FOREST INSECTS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 2150 and (ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020). Identification, importance, biology and management of principal insects of the urban forest.

ENTM 5360/5363 LANDSCAPE ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027) or (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Identification and management of arthropod pests in the landscape. Recognition of pests and damage to trees, turf and ornamental plants.

ENTM 5370 URBAN ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020. Identification, biology and control of insect and other household arthropod pests.

ENTM 5440 INSECT MORPHOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. ENTM 3040 and ENTM 4020. Departmental approval. Form and function in insects insects and related arthropods emphasizing morphological characteristics used in insect identification.

ENTM 5920 INTERNSHIP (3) IND. 3. SU. Departmental approval. Practical professional experience under the supervision of internship faculty and a representative of a state, federal, or private agency.

ENTM 6010 ENTOMOLOGY FOR EDUCATORS (4) LEC. 4. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Biology and diversity of insects and related arthropods with applications for educators. An insect collection and an entomological exposition are required.

ENTM 6030 INSECTICIDES IN THE ENVIRONMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. CHEM 1030 and CHEM 1031 and CHEM 1040 and CHEM 1041. Toxic action and environmental fate of insecticides, regulations, formulations, application methods, insecticide resistance and research methods.

ENTM 6120 MEDICAL-VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Survey of insects, ticks, and mites of veterinary importance, emphasizing role as vectors of disease agents and the biology of pathogen-transmission cycles. Labs focus on methods of vector sampling and surveillance, identification, and case studies of special topics. May count either ENTM 5120 or ENTM 6120.

ENTM 6140 AQUATIC INSECTS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040 or BIOL 4010. Departmental approval. Biology and ecology of aquatic and semi-aquatic insects. Laboratory sessions focus on identification at the family and generic levels, and experience in collecting and field techniques.

ENTM 6150 ARACHNOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040. Departmental approval. Biology, behavior and systematics of all arachnid groups, with major emphasis on spiders and mites.

ENTM 6220 INSECT ECOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060. Departmental approval. Ecological interactions of insects and their environment, with emphasis on herbivory, predation, parasitism and mutualism, as well as population and community dynamics.

ENTM 6300 SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY (5) LEC. 3. LAB. 6. Pr. ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020. Departmental approval. Principles of systematics and identification of insects through orders, families, genera, and species. Collections are required. Credit will not be given for both ENTM 4300 and ENTM 7300.

ENTM 6330 INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020. Integrated management of insects by environmental, biological, genetic, chemical and legal means.

ENTM 6340 URBAN FOREST INSECTS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 2150 and (ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020). Identification, importance, biology and management of principal insects of the urban forest.

ENTM 6360/6366 LANDSCAPE ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027) or (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Identification and management of arthropod pests in the landscape. Recognition of pests and damage to trees, turf and ornamental plants.

ENTM 6370 URBAN ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020. Identification, biology and control of insect and other household arthropod pests.

ENTM 6440 INSECT MORPHOLOGY (5) LEC. 3. LAB. 6. Pr. ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020. Departmental approval. Comparative external anatomy and generalized internal structures of insects. Characteristics used in taxonomy will be emphasized. Credit will not be given for both ENTM 5440 and ENTM 6440.

ENTM 6920 INTERNSHIP (3) IND. 3. SU. Departmental approval. Practical professional experience under the supervision of internship faculty and a representative of a state, federal, or private agency.

ENTM 7100 GENERAL TOXICOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040 and CHEM 2030. Departmental approval. History, mechanism of action, metabolism, and structure activity relationship of natural and synthetic insecticides. Contemporary laboratory techniques in toxicology will be featured.

ENTM 7130 BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL OF INSECTS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. (ENTM 3040 or ENTM 4020) and BIOL 3200. Departmental approval. Biology, ecology, classification and use of insect natural enemies.

ENTM 7190 PLANT AND ANIMAL INTERACTIONS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060. Departmental approval. Ecological and evolutionary interrelationships emphasizing pollination biology, seed dispersal and plant-herbivore interactions.

ENTM 7200 INSECT PHYSIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040. Departmental approval. Introduction to insect physiology stressing structure and function of each organ system. Methods used in physiological research will be emphasized.

ENTM 7330 MEDICAL-VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. ENTM 3040 or BIOL 6110. Departmental approval. Insects, mites, and other arthropods of medical or veterinary importance, identification of species, their biology and role as vectors of disease agents.

ENTM 7345 TROPICAL BIOLOGY: AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH (8) LEC. 4. LAB. 12. Pr. At least 15 credits each with a minimum grade of B in BIOL 7000-7999. Departmental approval. The principles of ecology in the tropics.

ENTM 7900 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENTOMOLOGY I (1-5) LEC. SU. Discussion groups on specific topics, assigned readings, on laboratory problems or field research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

ENTM 7910 TEACHING PRACTICUM (1) LAB. 2. SU. Departmental approval. The teaching practicum will address the practical and heretical issues of laboratory learning and facilitating the skills of pedagogy. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ENTM 7930 JOURNAL REVIEW FOR ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY (1) LEC. 1. Pr. ENTM 3040 and ENTM 4020 or (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003). Discussion of recent scientific publications on basic aspects of research in entomology and plant pathology. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ENTM 7950 SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. SU. Presentation and discussion of scientific literature of thesis research findings. Required of all M.S. candidates.

ENTM 7960 ADVANCED SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ENTOMOLOGY I (1-5) IND. Departmental approval. Specialized project or research on a specific topic in entomology to be conducted under faculty supervision. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

ENTM 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Topics may focus on technical laboratory problems or field research related to arthropod biology. Admission to the M.S. Program. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

ENTM 8900 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENTOMOLOGY II (1-5) LEC. SU. Discussion groups on specific topics, assigned reading on laboratory problems or field research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

ENTM 8910 TEACHING PRACTICUM (1-3) LAB. 2. SU. Departmental approval. Practical and theoretical issues of laboratory learning, and pedagogical facilitation. Required of all PhD students. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ENTM 8930 JOURNAL REVIEW FOR ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY (1) LEC. 1. Pr. ENTM 3040 and ENTM 4020 or (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003). Discussion of recent scientific publications on basic aspects of research in entomology and plant pathology. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ENTM 8950 SEMINAR (1) LEC. 1. SU. Presentation and discussion of scientific literature or dissertation research findings. Required of all Ph.D. students.

ENTM 8960 ADVANCED SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ENTOMOLOGY II (1-5) IND. Departmental approval. Credit to be arranged. Specialized project or research on a specific topic in entomology to be conducted under faculty supervision. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

ENTM 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Admission to the Ph.D. Program. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Environmental Science Courses

ENVI 1010 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (0) LEC. 1. SU. Introduction to the environmental science field and the ENVI major.

ENVI 1020 FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (2) LEC. 2. Preference given to students for whom the course is required. Survey of fundamental concepts, issues, and concerns related to environmental science.

ENVI 2010 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SEMINAR (1) LEC. 1. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. ENGL 1120 and departmental approval. Discussion of current issues in environmental science.

ENVI 4950 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SENIOR SEMINAR (2) LEC. 2. Pr. (ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127) and ENVI 1010 and ENVI 1020. Departmental approval. This course will cover oral and written professional presentations, assessment of students in the ENVI major via standardized testing, and student assessment via exit surveys.

ENVI 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

Fisheries & Allied Aqua Courses

FISH 1100 FISHERIES ORIENTATION (1) LEC. 1. SU. An introduction to the departmental programs and personnel and how to make the most of a future in fisheries.

FISH 2100 INTRODUCTION TO FISHERIES SCIENCES (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and FISH 1100. Hands-on field activities and site visits related to aquatic ecology, fisheries biology, and aquaculture.

FISH 3000 AGRICULTURAL GENETICS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Introductory understanding of the applications of genetics to agricultural and natural systems. Theoretical and practical knowledge of qualitative, quantitative, molecular, population, and biotechnological aspects of genetics will be developed.

FISH 3950 CAREERS IN FISHERIES (1) LEC. 1. SU. Pr. FISH 2100. Consideration of various aspects of fisheries work, career options as related to individual interests, and career planning or departmental approval. Fall.

FISH 4900 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FISHERIES (1-4) IND. SU. Individualized in depth study on a particular subject under the guidance of a professor. May include directed reading and research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FISH 4920 INTERNSHIP (1-5) INT. SU. Departmental approval. Discipline-related learning while employed with cooperating private industry or public agency. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

FISH 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Individual and group problems investigations in fisheries and allied aquacultures. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FISH 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-4) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FISH 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FISH 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FISH 5210 PRINCIPLES OF AQUACULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and FISH 2100. Principles underlying aquatic productivity and levels of management as demonstrated by present practices of aquaculture around the world.

FISH 5215 MARINE AQUACULTURE (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Departmental approval. Introduction to culture of marine species with emphasis in nutrition and feeding, reproductive biology, production techniques, processing, marketing and economics. Taught at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab. Summer.

FISH 5220 WATER SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CHEM 1040 and FISH 2100. Departmental approval. Properties of water, the water cycle, basic water chemistry and water quality with emphasis on water in managed ecosystems. Fall.

FISH 5240 HATCHERY MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 8. Pr. FISH 5210 or FISH 6210. Study of warm-water hatchery techniques and application of those techniques in the field. Spring.

FISH 5250 AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. FISH 5210. Factors affecting growth and yield of aquacultural species, with implications toward farming commonly cultured species. Production techniques for commercially important finfish are discussed. Summer.

FISH 5320 LIMNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CHEM 1040 and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and BIOL 3060. Limnology is the study of the chemical, physical, geological, biological, and ecological processes that influence the structure and function of freshwater communities.

FISH 5321 LIMNOLOGY LABORATORY (1) LAB. 4. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and CHEM 1040 and BIOL 3060 and (P/C FISH 5320 or P/C FISH 6320). Limnology is the study of the chemical, physical, geological, biological, and ecological processes that influence the structure and function of aquatic communities. May count either FISH 5321 or FISH 6321.

FISH 5380 GENERAL ICHTHYOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 6. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Survey of the biodiversity of world and local fishes, with an overview of ecology, behavior, biology and conservation of fishes. Fall.

FISH 5410 INTRODUCTION TO FISH HEALTH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Introduction to parasitic, bacterial and viral pathogens of wild and cultured finfish and shellfish. Fall.

FISH 5425 MARINE FISH DISEASES (4) LEC. 7.5. LAB. 6. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and BIOL 3200. Departmental approval. Introduction to diseases of marine finfish and shellfish and practical techniques used to isolate and identify diseases. Taught at Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Summer, First Term. Summer.

FISH 5440 FISH ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. FISH 5380. Departmental approval. Gross and microscopic fish anatomy.

FISH 5510 FISHERIES BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and FISH 2100. This course provides a general overview and introduction to fisheries management with emphasis on freshwater examples. The laboratory will provide hands-on field experience. Credit will not be given for both FISH 5510 and FISH 6510.

FISH 5520 SMALL IMPOUNDMENT MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 5. LAB. 10. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and FISH 2100. Major aspects of primarily recreational fishing pond management, including construction, stocking, water quality management, harvest strategy, diagnosis of problems and communication of analyses. Summer.

FISH 5630 FACILITIES FOR AQUACULTURE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and CHEM 1040 and FISH 2100. Principles and practice of site selection, design and construction of aquacultural facilities, with emphasis on impoundments and ponds. Odd years. Spring.

FISH 5650 FISH AND SEAFOOD PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CHEM 2030 and BIOL 3200. Emphasis on important species, market forms, preservation techniques, and rules and regulations of the seafood industry.

FISH 5670 FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURES EXTENSION METHODS (2) LEC. 2. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and CHEM 1040 and FISH 2100. Concepts and practices pertaining to aquacultural extension organization, administration, program development and implementation. Summer.

FISH 5710 AQUATIC MICROBIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Departmental approval. Overview of the diversity, genetics, physiology, and ecology of aquatic microorganisms, with an emphasis on bacteria, archaea and viruses.

FISH 5725 MARINE ICHTHYOLOGY (6) LEC. 6. Pr. BIOL 3060. General background in the biology of marine fishes and their taxonomy. Offered only at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, MS. Summer. Departmental approval; Admission to the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory.

FISH 5735 PRINCIPLES OF MARINE AQUACULTURE (6) LEC. 6. Pr. At least 16 credits in BIOL 1000-8999 Principles and technologies for culture of commercially important marine organisms. Offered at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, MS. Summer. Acceptance at GCRL.

FISH 5745 MARINE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 4. Overview of practical marine fishery management problems. Offered only at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, MS. Summer. Departmental approval; Admission to GCRL.

FISH 5970 TOPICS IN FISHERIES AND ALLIED AQUACULTURES (1-4) LEC. Instruction and discussion in a selected current topic in Fisheries, Aquaculture or Aquatic Sciences.

FISH 6210 PRINCIPLES OF AQUACULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Principles underlying aquatic productivity and levels of management as demonstrated by present practices of aquaculture around the world. Fall.

FISH 6215 MARINE AQUACULTURE (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Departmental approval. Introduction to culture of marine species with emphasis in nutrition and feeding, reproductive biology, production techniques, processing, marketing and economics. Taught at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab. Summer.

FISH 6220 WATER SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CHEM 1040. Departmental approval. Properties of water, the water cycle, basic water chemistry and water quality with emphasis on water in managed ecosystems. Fall.

FISH 6240 HATCHERY MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 8. Pr. FISH 6210. Study of warm-water hatchery techniques and application of those techniques in the field. Spring.

FISH 6250 AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Factors affecting growth and yield of aquacultural species, with implications toward farming commonly cultured species. Production techniques for commercially important finfish are discussed. Summer.

FISH 6320 LIMNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CHEM 1040 and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and BIOL 3060. Limnology is the study of the chemical, physical, geological, biological, and ecological processes that influence the structure and function of freshwater communities.

FISH 6321 LIMNOLOGY LABORATORY (1) LAB. 4. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and CHEM 1040 and BIOL 3060 and (P/C FISH 5320 or P/C FISH 6320). Limnology is the study of the chemical, physical, geological, biological, and ecological processes that influence the structure and function of aquatic communities. May count either FISH 5321 or FISH 6321.

FISH 6380 GENERAL ICHTHYOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 6. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Survey of the biodiversity of world and local fishes, with an overview of ecology, behavior, biology and conservation of fishes. Fall.

FISH 6410 INTRODUCTION TO FISH HEALTH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Introduction to parasitic, bacterial and viral pathogens of wild and cultured finfish and shellfish. Fall.

FISH 6425 MARINE FISH DISEASES (4) LEC. 7.5. LAB. 6. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and BIOL 3200. Departmental approval. Introduction to diseases of marine finfish and shellfish and practical techniques used to isolate and identify diseases. Taught at Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Summer, First Term. Summer.

FISH 6440 FISH ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. FISH 6380. Departmental approval. Gross and microscopic fish anatomy.

FISH 6510 FISHERIES BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. This course provides a general overview and introduction to fisheries management with emphasis on freshwater examples. The laboratory will provide hands-on field experience. Credit will not be given for both FISH 5510 and FISH 6510.

FISH 6520 SMALL IMPOUNDMENT MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 5. LAB. 10. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Major aspects of primarily recreational fishing pond management, including construction, stocking, water quality management, harvest strategy, diagnosis of problems and communication of analyses. Summer.

FISH 6630 FACILITIES FOR AQUACULTURE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Principles and practice of site selection, design and construction of aquacultural facilities, with emphasis on impoundments and ponds. Odd years. Spring.

FISH 6650 FISH AND SEAFOOD PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CHEM 2030 and BIOL 3200. Emphasis on important species, market forms, preservation techniques, and rules and regulations of the seafood industry. Summer.

FISH 6670 FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE EXTENSION METHODS (2) LEC. 2. Concepts and practices pertaining to aquacultural extension organization, administration, program development and implementation. Summer.

FISH 6710 AQUATIC MICROBIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Departmental approval. Overview of the diversity, genetics, physiology, and ecology of aquatic microorganisms, with an emphasis on bacteria, archaea and viruses.

FISH 6725 MARINE ICHTHYOLOGY (6) LEC. 6. Pr. BIOL 3060 and FISH 6380. General background in the biology of marine fishes and their taxonomy. Offered only at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, MS. Summer. Departmental approval ; Admission to Gulf Coast Research Laboratory.

FISH 6735 PRINCIPLES OF MARINE AQUACULTURE (6) LEC. 6. Pr. At least 16 credits each with a minimum grade of B in BIOL 6000-8999. Departmental approval. Principles and technologies for culture of commercially important marine organisms. Offered at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, MS. Summer. Acceptance at GCRL;

FISH 6745 MARINE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 4. Overview of practical marine fishery management problems. Offered only at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, MS. Summer. Departmental approval; Admission to GCRL.

FISH 6970 TOPICS IN FISHERIES AND ALLIED AQUACULTURES (1-4) LEC. Instruction and discussion in a selected current topic in Fisheries, Aquaculture or Aquatic Sciences.

FISH 7230 WATER AND SEDIMENT QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN AQUACULTURE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. FISH 6220. Departmental approval. Advanced treatment of water and sediment quality management in aquaculture. Analytical methods for soil and water quality. Fall.

FISH 7240 RESOURCE USE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN AQUACULTURE (2) LEC. 2. Resource use, environmental effects, and sustainability of aquaculture with emphasis on approaches to improving efficiency and reducing negative environmental effects. Fall.

FISH 7270 CRUSTACEAN AND MOLLUSCAN AQUACULTURE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. FISH 5210 or FISH 6210 or departmental approval. General biology and culture techniques of the major shrimp, crawfish and shellfish species cultured throughout the world. Spring.

FISH 7330 RESERVOIR LIMNOLOGY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 5. Pr. FISH 5320 or FISH 6320. Departmental approval. Consideration of the ecological characteristics of reservoirs as they relate to modern concepts of ecosystem management. Even years. Summer.

FISH 7340 FISH ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060. Study of interactions among fish and their environment. Laboratory will emphasize critical literature reading and experimental approaches. Even years. Fall. BIOL 3060 or equivalent.

FISH 7350 META-ANALYSIS (2) LEC. 2. Meta-Analysis is a quantitative approach for synthesizing results from diverse research studies that address a similar hypothesis.

FISH 7360 MANAGEMENT OF AQUATIC FLORA IN FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 6. Pr. BIOL 6120 or departmental approval. Role of aquatic vegetation in fish production, its utilization and control. Odd years. Summer. BIOL 6120 or equivalent

FISH 7380 ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF RIVERINE SYSTEMS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 7370. River systems within a landscape ecology and ecosystem management context. Laboratory sessions stress techniques for assessment and management. Even years. Spring.

FISH 7410 MOLECULAR DIAGNOSIS: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to molecular biology techniques currently used in disease diagnosis.

FISH 7420 FISH DISEASES (4) LEC. 4. Pr. BIOL 3200. Departmental approval. Diagnostic techniques for viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic diseases of fishes, including etiologic agents, geographical ranges, species susceptibility, clinical signs, clinical pathology, epidemiology and management. Fall.

FISH 7450 FISH PATHOLOGY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FISH 5410 or FISH 6410 or FISH 7420. Departmental approval. Morphological and physiological changes in fish with infectious or non-infectious diseases. Even years. Fall.

FISH 7460 CLINICAL FISH DISEASE DIAGNOSIS (1-3) LEC. Pr. FISH 6410 and FISH 7420. Departmental approval. Practical experience in necropsy of diseased fish. Identification of causative agents and prescription of appropriate disease control. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FISH 7530 FISH POPULATION DYNAMICS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. FISH 6510 or FISH 5510 and STAT 7040. Departmental approval. Derivation of fish population estimates, growth, recruitment and mortality; use of modeling techniques to assess exploited fish populations. Even years. Spring.

FISH 7540 QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUES IN FISHERY ASSESSMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. FISH 6510 or FISH 5510 and STAT 7000 and STAT 7040. Departmental approval. Quantitative techniques to assess and manage fish populations in freshwater. The laboratory will analyze actual fisheries data using SAS on personal computers. Odd years. Spring.

FISH 7550 SEQUENCE-BASED SCIENCE: TECHNOLOGY AND APPLICATION (2) LEC. 2. Pr. BIOL 6230. Technology and application of high-throughput sequencing approaches to scientific research.

FISH 7640 FISH NUTRITION (3) LEC. 3. Fundamental and applied aspects of fish nutrition, including nutrient requirements, physiology of food assimilation, feed preparation, and practical feeding.

FISH 7641 FISH NUTRITION LABORATORY (2) LAB. 6. Coreq. FISH 7640. Laboratory exercises in analysis of fish feeds and formulation and preparation of fish feeds. Summer.

FISH 7650 TRADITIONAL APPROACHES TO FISH GENETIC ENHANCEMENT (2) LEC. 2. Pr. BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003. Departmental approval. This course is intended to teach the philosophy of fish, shellfish and crustacean genetics, selective breeding, genetic management and inheritance.

FISH 7660 MOLECULAR GENETICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003. Departmental approval. Principles and application of DNA fingerprinting technologies, gene mapping, genetic information and analysis using internet tools, transgenic technologies. Even years. Fall.

FISH 7715 ADVANCED MARINE ECOLOGY (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Mechanisms that control distribution of plants and animals at scales ranging from individual organism to ecosystem

FISH 7725 MARINE BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Marine biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and metals, with emphasis on estuarine systems.

FISH 7735 MARINE PLANKTON (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FISH 7755 or BIOL 7575. Taxonomy of phytoplankton, bacterioplankton and zooplankton in estuaries, coastal seas and open oceans. Dauphin Island Sea Lab. Spring.

FISH 7745 MARINE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Survey of microorganisms found in marine environment with emphasis on interaction of microgranisms with each other and with their environment.

FISH 7750 BIOTECHNOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO FISH GENETICS (2) LEC. 2. Pr. FISH 7650. Departmental approval. This course is intended to teach the philosophy of fish, shellfish and crustacean genetics, genetic management genetic engineering, genomic manipulation and genetic biotechnology.

FISH 7755 BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3) LEC. 3. Comprehensive survey of marine organisms and their biological interactions. Taught at Dauphin Island Sea Lab. Spring.

FISH 7765 CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. In-depth examination of the chemistry of seawater and its relationship with biological, geological and physical processes in the oceans. Dauphin Island Sea Lab. Spring.

FISH 7775 FISHERIES OCEANOGRAPHY (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. An examination of the relationship between fish life history, recruitment dynamics, harvest potential, and oceanographic processes. Taught at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab.

FISH 7785 PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4) LEC. 4. Departmental approval. Describes observed physical setting of the marine environment, and qualitatively explains how and why observed physical phenomena occur.

FISH 7900 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FISHERIES I (1-4) IND. SU. Individualized in-depth study on a particular subject under the guidance of a professor. May include directed readings and research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FISH 7920 INTERNSHIP IN FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE (1-10) INT. SU. Departmental approval. Field experience in aquaculture, fisheries or aquatic resource management on farm or with research, extension or aquatic management agency. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FISH 7930 GRADUATE SEMINAR SERIES (1) LEC. 1. SU. Acquaint students with current research and related activities.

FISH 7950 GRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. SU. Oral presentation and discussion of research in the field of specialization. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

FISH 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FISHERIES AND ALLIED AQUACULTURES (1-3) LEC. Individual or group project and research in consultation with faculty member on problem in fisheries and allied aquacultures. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FISH 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

FISH 8900 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FISHERIES II (1-4) IND. SU. Individualized in-depth study on a particular subject under the guidance of a professor. May include directed readings and research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FISH 8930 GRADUATE SEMINAR SERIES (1) LEC. 1. SU. Acquaint students with current research and related activities.

FISH 8950 SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. SU. Departmental approval. Acquaint students with current research and related activities.

FISH 8960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FISHERIES AND ALLIED AQUACULTURES (1-3) LEC. Individualized work and research in consultation with faculty member on problem in fisheries and allied aquacultures. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FISH 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Food Science Courses

FDSC 1000 INTRODUCTORY FOOD SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Overview of food science discipline including food selection, food composition, food safety and sanitation, food processing, packaging, commodity types, and food laws.

FDSC 4290 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN FOOD SCIENCE (1) LEC. 1. Preparing for careers; enhancing computer and communication skills; planning for professional advancement. Spring.

FDSC 4910 FOOD SCIENCE PRACTICUM (3) PRA. 3. Practical experience in food industry, governmental laboratories, or other food science sites.

FDSC 4920 FOOD SCIENCE INTERNSHIP (3) INT. 3. SU. Pr., departmental approval. Practical on-the-job training in the poultry or food industry. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FDSC 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FOOD SCIENCE (1-3) IND. 2.50 GPA or departmental approval. Individual or group projects with a faculty member in food science. May include literary research, data analysis or acombination of these. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FDSC 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Instruction and discussion of current topics associated with food science. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

FDSC 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FDSC 5150/5153 FOOD LAWS AND REGULATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Federal and state laws and regulations and case history affecting food production, processing, packaging, marketing and distribution of food and food productions. History of food law, enactment of laws and regulations, legal research and regulatory agencies. Course is taught exclusively online. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 5150 and FDSC 6150.

FDSC 5200/5203 DEVELOPING, IMPLEMENTING, AND AUDITING FOOD SAFETY PROGRAMS (3) LEC. 3. Theory and practice of food safety program design and implementation; includes internal and third-party audits. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 5200 and FDSC 6200.

FDSC 5430 FOOD CHEMISTRY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. CHEM 2030 or CHEM 2070 or CHEM 2077. Chemistry of food components; chemical and physical changes of food during processing and storage. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 5430 and FDSC 6430.

FDSC 5450 FOOD ANALYSIS AND QUALITY CONTROL (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. FDSC 5430. Principles and application of chemical and instrumental food analyses; quality control procedures. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 5450 and FDSC 6450.

FDSC 5640 FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 6. Pr. FDSC 5430. Food product development from concept to market. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 5640 and FDSC 6640. Spring.

FDSC 5660 FOOD MICROBIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3200. Introduction to basic and applied microbiology in food; including how bacteria, viruses, parasites, yeasts and molds affect and are in turn affected by foods both positively and negatively. May count either FDSC 5660, BIOL 5660, FDSC 6660 or BIOL 6660.

FDSC 5700 MICROBIOLOGY OF MEATS AND OTHER FOODS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037 or BIOL 3200. Microorganisms associated with meat and other foods production, spoilage, and safety with training in both traditional and modern detection echniques May count either ANSC 5700, FDSC 5700, ANSC 6700, or FDSC 6700.

FDSC 5730 SENSORY EVALUATION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. History and methods of sensory testing of food products, factors affecting results. May count one of the following: ANSC 5730, ANSC 6730, FDSC 5730, FDSC 6730.

FDSC 5770 FOOD PLANT SANITATION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3200 or Departmental approval. Sanitary regulations and procedures for hazard control and quality assurance in food industry. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 5770 and FDSC 6770. Fall.

FDSC 6150/6156 FOOD LAWS AND REGULATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Federal and state laws and regulations and case history affecting food production, processing, packaging, marketing, and distribution of food and food productions. History of food law, enactment of laws and regulations, legal research and regulatory agencies. Course is taught exclusively online. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 6150 and FDSC 5150.

FDSC 6200/6206 DEVELOPING, IMPLEMENTING, AND AUDITING FOOD SAFETY PROGRAMS (3) LEC. 3. Theory and practice of food safety program design and implementation; includes internal and third-party audits. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 6200 and FDSC 5200.

FDSC 6430 FOOD CHEMISTRY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. CHEM 2030 or CHEM 2070 or CHEM 2077. Chemistry of food components; chemical and physical changes of food during processing and storage. May count either FDSC 5430 or FDSC 6430.

FDSC 6450 FOOD ANALYSIS AND QUALITY CONTROL (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. FDSC 6430. Principles and application of chemical and instrumental food analyses; quality control procedures. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 6450 and FDSC 5450.

FDSC 6640 FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 6. Pr. FDSC 6430. Departmental approval. Food product development from concept to market. Credit will not be given for both FDSC 6640 and FDSC 5640. Spring.

FDSC 6660 FOOD MICROBIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3200. General Microbiology or departmental approval. Introduction to basic and applied microbiology in food; including how bacteria, viruses, parasites, yeasts and molds affect and are in turn affected by foods both positively and negatively. May count either FDSC 5660, BIOL 5660, FDSC 6660 or BIOL 6660.

FDSC 6700 MICROBIOLOGY OF MEATS AND OTHER FOODS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037 or BIOL 3200. Microorganisms associated with meat and other foods production, spoilage, and safety with training in both traditional and modern detection techniques. May count either ANSC 5700, FDSC 5700, ANSC 6700, or FDSC 6700.

FDSC 6730 SENSORY EVALUATION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. History and methods of sensory testing of food products, factors affecting results. May count one of the following: ANSC 5730, ANSC 6730, FDSC 5730, FDSC 6730.

FDSC 6770 FOOD PLANT SANITATION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3200 or Departmental approval. Sanitary regulations and procedures for hazard control and quality assurance in food industry. Credit is not allowed for both FDSC 5770 and FDSC 6770. Fall.

FDSC 7200 CARBOHYDRATE CHEMISTRY AND FUNCTIONALITY IN FOODS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FDSC 6430. Departmental approval. Chemistry and functionality of sugars, starches and hydrocolloids as applied to food systems.

FDSC 7210 FOOD PROTEINS AND FATS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FDSC 6430. Departmental approval. Advanced theories and practices of food science in the areas of protein and fat.

FDSC 7930 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-6) IND. Departmental approval. Advanced reading or research approved and supervised by a faculty member. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FDSC 7950 GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. Literature in poultry science, food science or related field. Emphasis given to preparation, organization, and presentation of research materials and to reporting current literature in the field. May count either POUL 7950 or FDSC 7950. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FDSC 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-4) IND/ST1. Departmental approval. Critical analysis of classic and current research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

FDSC 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FOOD SCIENCE (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Instruction and discussion of current advanced topics associated with food science. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

FDSC 7980/7986 NONTHESIS RESEARCH (1-4) RES. Departmental approval. enrolled as FDSG MAg student. Research conducted as part of the Master of Agriculture degree.

FDSC 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Departmental approval. Research in an area of specialization. Course may be repeated with change in topic.

FDSC 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Departmental approval. Research in an area of specialization. Course may be repeated with change in topic.

Horticulture Courses

HORT 1010 INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE (1) LEC. 1. Introduces scientific and practical aspects of pomology, olericulture, floriculture and landscape horticulture. Also presents the broad scope of career opportunities in the field of horticultural science. Fall.

HORT 2010 FRUIT AND NUT PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Introductory course in cultural practices and economics associated with commercial fruit and nut production. Fall.

HORT 2020 HORTICULTURE CROP PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 1010 or BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Techniques of plant propagation and cultural methods for successful fruit and vegetable production. Fall.

HORT 2030 VEGETABLE PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Principles, practices, establishment, production, maintenance, harvesting, storage and marketing of commercial vegetable crops.

HORT 2040/2043 ORGANIC GARDENING (3) LEC. 3. Principles, production practices, maintenance, harvesting and marketing of organically and traditionally home-grown vegetables.

HORT 2050/2053 FOOD FOR THOUGHT (3) LEC. 3. Study of history of food plants, including their impact on world culture, variety of uses, economic botany, production systems, and impact on societies. Fall.

HORT 2060 HYDROPONICS: PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF SOILLESS PLANT PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. This course is a survey of the science of hydroponic plant production and is focused on commercial and home vegetable crop production. Specific topics include plant growth and nutrition in hydroponic growing systems, challenges and opportunities, and system design.

HORT 2210 LANDSCAPE GARDENING (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Principles of landscape gardening applied to residential and small-scale commercial grounds. Involves plant identification and use, basic landscape design, and landscape installation and management concepts. Summer and Fall.

HORT 2240 PLANT PROPAGATION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. P/C BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Basic principles and practices involved in the propagation of horticulture plants. Departmental approval. Fall and Spring.

HORT 2250 ART OF FLORAL DESIGN (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Basic art principles and design elements and their use with flowers and foliage; history and utilization of flowers within society.

HORT 3000 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF HORTICULTURAL PLANTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and CHEM 1030. Growth and development of plants with concepts applied to the practice of Horticultural Science. Summer and Fall.

HORT 3110 PLANTS AND PEOPLE: A HISTORY OF GARDENS IN CULTURAL CONTEXT (3) LEC. 3. Heritage and traditions influencing the development of public and private garden styles, context, and function including cultural expressions, plant use, and impact of noted designers and horticulturists throughout history.

HORT 3210 SMALL TREES, SHRUBS AND VINES (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 6. Pr. (BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027) and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Identification, culture and landscape use of small trees, shrubs and vines. Spring and Summer.

HORT 3220 ARBORICULTURE (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 6. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Identification, culture and use of ornamental trees in landscape plantings. Departmental approval. Fall.

HORT 3280 LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION (3) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Principles and practices used in the interpretation and implementation of landscape construction and planting plans. Fall.

HORT 3800 CAREERS IN HORTICULTURE (1) LEC. 1. SU. Current developments and career opportunities in horticulture. Fall.

HORT 3840 STUDY/TRAVEL IN HORTICULTURE (1-10) AAB/FLD. Study of horticultural or fruit and vegetable science, landscape design, nursery and greenhouse management in U.S. or international location. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

HORT 3920 HORTICULTURE INTERNSHIP (4) INT. 4. Practical on-the-job training for selected commercial horticultural companies. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

HORT 3950 CAREERS IN HORTICULTURE (1) LEC. 1. SU. Current developments and career opportunities in horticulture. Fall.

HORT 4000 PESTICIDE MGT IN HORT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENTM 4020 and (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003). Proper management of pesticides in horticulture; decision making skills in relation to control strategies; environmental issues relevant to horticulture; safety considerations; scouting and application techniques. Fall.

HORT 4100 HERBACEOUS ORNAMENTALS (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. (BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027) and (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037). Identification, culture, and use of herbaceous annuals and perennials, bulbs, herbs, and ornamental grasses. Consideration of flower bed and border preparation, care and maintenance. Spring and Summer.

HORT 4250 INTERMEDIATE FRUIT & VEG PROD (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (HORT 2040 or HORT 2043) or HORT 2030. Intermediate horticulture course in which students apply knowledge gained in the classroom to hands-on fruit and vegetable gardening practices.

HORT 4270 INTERMEDIATE LANDSCAPE DESIGN (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. HORT 3210 or HORT 3220 or HORT 4100. Human nature, art and technology and their influence on landscape design.

HORT 4280 ADVANCED LANDSCAPE DESIGN (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 4. Pr. HORT 4270. Continuation of HORT 4270 with an emphasis on design projects. Fall.

HORT 4300 COMP AIDED PLANTING DESIGN (3) LEC. 3. Graphic concepts relating to spatial visualization and communication and project cost estimation using computer aided drafting and project management software developed for landscape professionals. Spring.

HORT 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) AAB/IND. Departmental approval. Directed Studies related to research, teaching or outreach educational programs in Horticulture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HORT 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) LEC. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

HORT 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) IND. 3. Principles, methods and techniques for understanding various horticultural disciplines. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HORT 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

HORT 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) LEC. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

HORT 5110 TREE FRUIT CULTURE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. HORT 3000. Manipulation of growth and development of tree fruit crops by cultural methods. Departmental approval. Summer, odd years. May count either HORT 5110 or HORT 6110.

HORT 5120 SMALL FRUIT AND PECAN CULTURE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. HORT 3000. Principles and practices involved in the production and marketing of small fruits and pecans. Departmental approval. Spring.

HORT 5130 SUSTAINABLE VEGETABLE CROP PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and HORT 3000. Best management practices and quality of vegetable crops. Departmental approval. Spring.

HORT 5140 POST-HARVEST BIOLOGY AND TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003) and HORT 3000. Physiological changes occurring in fruits, vegetables and other horticultural products after harvest. Departmental approval. Spring.

HORT 5150 RETAIL GARDEN CENTER MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. HORT 3210 or HORT 3220 or Departmental approval. The following topics will be covered: financing, location, design, stocking, selling, personnel management, advertising and maintaining plants. May count either HORT 5150 or HORT 6150.

HORT 5210 LANDSCAPE BIDDING, INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043) and (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003). Principles and practices of the bidding, installation and maintenance of commercial and residential landscapes. Spring.

HORT 5220 GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. HORT 3000 and CHEM 1030 and HORT 2240 and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Management, culture and economics of commercial greenhouse production. Fall.

HORT 5230 NURSERY MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. HORT 2240 and HORT 3000. Factors affecting plant production. Environmental issues related to facilities design and pesticide and nutrient management. Departmental approval. Fall.

HORT 5240 PUBLIC GARDEN MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Understanding personnel structure and responsibilities; plant care and management; and the educational, entertainment, and conservation missions of public gardens.

HORT 5280 ADVANCED LANDSCAPE DESIGN (3) LEC. 5. Pr. HORT 4270. Departmental approval. Continuation of HORT 4270 with an emphasis on design projects.

HORT 5910 HORTICULTURE PRACTICUM (4) LEC. 1. LAB. 6. Practical application of a broad range of horticultural subject-matter knowledge and skills. May count either HORT 5910 or HORT 6910. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

HORT 6110 TREE FRUIT CULTURE (2) LEC. 2. Pr. HORT 3000. Manipulation of growth and development of tree fruit crops by cultural methods. Departmental approval. Summer, odd years.

HORT 6120 SMALL FRUIT AND PECAN CULTURE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 3100 and BIOL 3101. Principles and practices involved in the production and marketing of small fruits and pecans. Departmental approval. Spring, even years.

HORT 6130 SUSTAINABLE VEGETABLE CROP PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. HORT 3000. Advanced course in best management practices and quality of vegetable crops. Departmental approval. Spring.

HORT 6140 POST-HARVEST BIOLOGY AND TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003) and HORT 3000. Physiological changes occurring in fruits, vegetables and other horticultural products after harvest. Spring.

HORT 6150 RETAIL GARDEN CENTER MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. HORT 3210 or HORT 3220. Departmental approval. Topics included: financing, location, design, stocking, selling, personnel management, advertising, and maintaining plants. Graduate students will evaluate garden centers and provide feedback for improvement.

HORT 6210 LANDSCAPE BIDDING, INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) and (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Principles and practices of the bidding, installation and maintenance of commercial and residential landscapes. Spring.

HORT 6220 GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. HORT 3000 and CHEM 1030 and HORT 2240 and (CSES 2040 or CSES 2043) or (AGRN 2040 or AGRN 2043). Management, culture and economics of commercial greenhouse production. Fall.

HORT 6230 NURSERY MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 4. Pr. HORT 2240 and HORT 3000. Factors affecting plant production. Environmental issues related to facilities design and pesticide and nutrient management. Departmental approval. Fall.

HORT 6240 PUBLIC GARDEN MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Understanidng personnel structure and responsiblities; plant care and management; and the educational, entertainment, and conservation missions of public garddens.

HORT 6280 ADVANCED LANDSCAPE DESIGN (3) LEC. 5. Pr. HORT 4270. Departmental approval. Continuation of HORT 4270 with an emphasis on design projects.

HORT 6910 HORTICULTURE PRACTICUM (4) LEC. 1. LAB. 6. Practical application of a broad range of horticultural subject-matter knowledge and skills. May count either HORT 5910 or HORT 6910. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

HORT 7010 EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN HORTICULTURE (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Principles and methodologies of horticultural research, experimental design, preparation of project and grant proposals, and development of publication skills. Departmental approval. Fall.

HORT 7040 ADVANCED GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF HORTICULTURAL PLANTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (HORT 3000 or BIOL 3100) and BIOL 3101. Plant growth and development from seed germination, through maturity and senescence. Summer, even years.

HORT 7050 NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF HORTICULTURAL PLANTS (3) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. HORT 3000. Nutritional requirements of horticulture crops and factors affecting these requirements. Departmental approval. Summer, odd years.

HORT 7070 PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003. Plant biotechnology, including plant tissue culture technologies and genetic transformation and applications to horticultural crop improvement. Departmental approval. Spring, odd years.

HORT 7080 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANT STRESS (3) LEC. 4. Pr. HORT 3000. Departmental approval. Mechanisms related to adaptation of plants to environmental stresses.

HORT 7840 GRADUATE STUDY/TRAVEL IN HORTICULTURE (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Programmed activities to enhance national/international awareness and enable students to understand horticultural practices in diverse areas. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

HORT 7850 URBAN FORESTRY SEMINAR (1) LEC. 3. SU. Presentation and discussion of research, scientific papers and issues related to urban forestry establishment, care and planning. Credit will not be given for HORT 7850 and FORY 7850.

HORT 7920 GRADUATE INTERNSHIP (1-4) INT. Departmental approval. Supervised professional experience in horticulture

HORT 7950 SEMINAR (1) SEM. SU. Graduate students are required to attend all seminars. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

HORT 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. 3. Conferences, problems and assigned readings in horticulture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HORT 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HORTICULTURE (1-3) LEC. Principles, methods and techniques involved in gaining an understanding of different horticultural disciplines. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

HORT 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

HORT 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Plant Pathology Courses

PLPA 1000 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED BIOTECHNOLOGY (1) LEC. 1. Introduction to the field of biotechnology including key concepts from biology, chemistry, and physics, and career opportunities.

PLPA 2000 PESTS, PATHOGENS, PARASITES, AND PEOPLE (3) LEC. 3. Past and present problems of pests and disease involving humans and the food chain.

PLPA 3000/3003 GENERAL PLANT PATHOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Survey of plant diseases common in Alabama, including symptom recognition, pathogen biology and management of plant diseases. Course credit will not be given for both PLPA 3000 and PLPA 3003/3004.

PLPA 4100 APPLIED BIOTECHNOLOGY II (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and (BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003) and ENTM 3100. Principle and up-to-date advances of genetic modification of organisms; its practices and influences in a broad range of basic and applied sciences which have revolutionized "means" of sustainable agriculture.

PLPA 4950 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (1) LEC. 1. Development of professional skills required for modern careers in entomology, plant pathology and applied biotechnology.

PLPA 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Supervised work on a project in plant pathology. Areas of study are: A. Mycology; B. Nematology; C. Virology; D. Bacteriology; E. Extension and Clinic Experience; F. Physiological and Molecular Approaches. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

PLPA 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department.

PLPA 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Assigned readings on topics pertinent to plant pathology or individual student endeavor consisting of directed research and writing of honor's thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

PLPA 5050 PLANT DISEASE DIAGNOSIS (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Approaches, techniques, and practical experience in diagnosis of plant diseases. Credit will not be given for both PLPA 5050 and PLPA 6050. Summer.

PLPA 5060 PLANT DISEASE MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Aspects of plant disease management including cultural practices, plant resistance, biological and chemical control, and disease forecasting. Spring.

PLPA 5200/5203 MYCOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Biology of fungi with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, physiology, genetics, reproduction, and how fungi interact with their ecosystems including plants, animals, and humans. Credit will only be given to one of the following: PLPA 5200, 5203, 6200, or 6206

PLPA 5400 PLANT VIROLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Departmental approval. Introduction to plant viruses and the diseases they cause; virus particle structure and replication strategies; disease identification by symptoms and detection of pathogen; transmission, ecology, epidemiology and control.

PLPA 5500/5503 PLANT NEMATOLOGY (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Departmental approval. Presentation of nematodes in relation to plant diseases, identification of plant nematodes; nature of pathogenicity; principles and practices of management; recent advances in phytonematology. May count either PLPA 5500 or PLPA 6500.

PLPA 5600 PHYSIOLOGY OF PLANT HEALTH AND DISEASE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003. Comprehensive coverage of present advances in plant defense-related metabolic pathways: how to recognize pathogen infections, and activate/potentiate disease resistances. Introduces biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms by which plants defend/assimilate themselves towards diverse a/biotic stress stimuli.

PLPA 5920 INTERNSHIP (3) IND. 3. SU. Departmental approval. Practical professional experience under the supervision of internship faculty and a representative of a state, federal, or private agency.

PLPA 6050 PLANT DISEASE DIAGNOSIS (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Experience with plant disease diagnosis procedures and the diagnosis of many common plant diseases. Summer.

PLPA 6060 PLANT DISEASE MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Aspects of plant disease management including cultural practices, plant resistance, biological and chemical control, and disease forecasting. Spring.

PLPA 6200/6206 MYCOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Biology of fungi with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, physiology, genetics, reproduction, and how fungi interact with their ecosystems including plants, animals, and humans. Credit will only be given to one of the following: PLPA 5200, PLPA 5203, PLPA 6200 or PLPA 6206.

PLPA 6400 PLANT VIROLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Departmental approval. Introduction to plant viruses and the diseases they cause; virus particle structure and replication strategies; disease identification by symptoms and detection of pathogen; transmission, ecology, epidemiology and control.

PLPA 6500/6506 PLANT NEMATOLOGY (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Departmental approval. Presentation of nematodes in relation to plant diseases, identification of plant nematodes; nature of pathogenicity; principles and practices of management; recent advances in phytonematology. May count either PLPA 5500 or PLPA 6500.

PLPA 6600 PHYSIOLOGY OF PLANT HEALTH AND DISEASE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3003 or Departmental approval. Comprehensive coverage of present advances in plant defense-related metabolic pathways: how to recognize pathogen infections, and activate/potentiate disease resistances, biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanism by which plants defend/assimilate themselves towards diverse a/biotic stress stimuli. May count either PLPA 5600 or PLPA 6600.

PLPA 6920 INTERNSHIP (3) IND. 3. SU. Departmental approval. Practical professional experience under the supervision of internship faculty and a representative of a state, federal, or private agency.

PLPA 7080 FIELD SURVEY OF PLANT PATHOLOGY (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 6. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Practical aspects of plant diseases under field conditions, on-site visits via field trips; discussion of experimental design for field research. Summer.

PLPA 7300 PLANT-BACTERIAL INTERACTIONS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Departmental approval. Biochemical and molecular basis of plant-bacterial interactions, including colonization, pathogenesis, symbiotic and associative nitrogen fixation, and transformation. Fall.

PLPA 7820 RESEARCH PROPOSAL WRITING (4) LEC. 3. Experience in all aspects of writing and reviewing competitive research proposals through a workshop-format culminating in each student writing a proposal on research topics of their choosing. Fall.

PLPA 7860 PLANT DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003. Aspects of plant disease epidemiology including disease assessment and temporal progress, pathogen spread, and yield loss determination.

PLPA 7861 PLANT DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY LABORATORY (2) LAB. 4. Coreq. PLPA 7860. Quantitative aspects of plant disease epidemiology including spatial and temporal modeling, and disease system simulation.

PLPA 7900 DIRECTED STUDIES IN PLANT PATHOLOGY (1-5) LEC. SU. Discussion groups on specific tipics, assigned reading on laboratory problems or field research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

PLPA 7910 TEACHING PRACTICUM (1) LAB. 2. SU. Departmental approval. The teaching practicum will address the practical and heretical issues of laboratory learning and facilitating the skills of pedagogy. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

PLPA 7930 JOURNAL REVIEW FOR ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY (1) LEC. 1. Pr. ENTM 3040 and ENTM 4020 or (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003). Discussion of recent scientific publications on basic aspects of research in entomology and plant pathology. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

PLPA 7950 SEMINAR IN PLANT PATHOLOGY (1) SEM. 1. SU. Departmental approval. Seminar presentations on current departmental research and current issues in plant pathology and related disciplines. Fall, Spring. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

PLPA 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY (1-5) IND. Departmental approval. Credit to be arranged. Specialized project or research on a specific topic in plant pathology to be conducted under faculty supervision. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

PLPA 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Departmental approval. Research and thesis on problems in plant pathology. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

PLPA 8880 PHYSIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. PLPA 7300 and (PLPA 6200 or PLPA 6206) and PLPA 6400. Departmental approval. Comprehensive coverage of physiology and molecular biology of plant-pathogen interactions. Spring.

PLPA 8900 DIRECTED STUDIES IN PLANT PATHOLOGY (1-5) LEC. SU. Discussion groups on specific topics, assigned reading on laboratory problems or field research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

PLPA 8910 TEACHING PRACTICUM (1-3) LAB. 2. SU. Departmental approval. Practical and theoretical issues of laboratory learning, and pedagogical facilitation. Required of all PhD students. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

PLPA 8930 JOURNAL REVIEW FOR ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY (1) LEC. 1. Pr. ENTM 3040 and ENTM 4020 or (PLPA 3000 or PLPA 3003). Discussion of recent scientific publications on basic aspects of research in entomology and plant pathology. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

PLPA 8950 SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. SU. Presentations and discussion of scientific literature or dissertation research findings. Required for al Ph.D. candidates. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

PLPA 8960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY (1-5) IND. Departmental approval. Credit to be arranged. Specialized project or research on a specific topic in plant pathology to be conducted under faculty supervision. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.

PLPA 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Departmental approval. Research and dissertation on problems in plant pathology. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Poultry Science Courses

POUL 1000 INTRODUCTORY POULTRY SCIENCE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Introduction to the poultry species and their commercial production, physiology, nutrition and management. Fall.

POUL 2000 POULTRY AND EGG EVALUATION AND SELECTION (1) LAB. 1. A hands-on approach to poultry and egg evaluation based on the U.S. poultry and Egg guidelines and how to properly care for and handle the birds. Spring and Fall. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

POUL 3030 COMMERCIAL POULTRY PRODUCTION (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. The organization and management principles of the commercial poultry meat and egg production industries. Fall.

POUL 3060 POULTRY BREEDING, FERTILITY, AND HATCHABILITY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Breeding systems used in developing modern breeds of poultry. Genetic, physiological and environmental factors affecting fertility, embryonic development, and hatch ability. Spring.

POUL 3100 BASICS OF ANIMAL FEED MANUFACTURING (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Overview of processes involving manufacturing feed for poultry, livestock, and aquaculture.

POUL 3150 POULTRY PHYSIOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. The physiological principles and characteristics of poultry species which directly interact with commercial management systems. Spring.

POUL 4100 SUPERVISED INVESTIGATION (1-4) IND. Pr. 2.50 GPA. Departmental approval. Advanced independent investigation in major field of poultry or avian science. Requirements include review of literature, successful and timely completion of research project, and presentation of results in written and/or oral report. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

POUL 4920 POULTRY SCIENCE INTERNSHIP (3) INT. 3. SU. Pr., departmental approval. Practical on-the-job training in the poultry or food industry. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

POUL 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN POULTRY SCIENCE (1-3) IND. 2.5 GPA or departmental approval. Individual or group projects with a faculty member in poultry science. May include literary research, data analysis or a combination of these. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

POUL 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POULTRY SCIENCE (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Instruction and discussion of selected current topics in poultry science. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

POUL 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty within the department. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

POUL 5050 POULTRY FEEDING (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and BCHE 3200. The application of the principles of nutrition to poultry; the functions of individual nutrients, their deficiency symptoms and their supply in terms of feedstuffs and practical poultry diets. Credit will not be given for both POUL 5050 and POUL 6050. Fall.

POUL 5080/5083 POULTRY HEALTH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) and BIOL 3200 and (CHEM 2030 or CHEM 2070 or CHEM 2077). Study of the prevention, diagnosis, control and treatment of economically important diseases of poultry. Credit will not be given for both POUL 5080 and POUL 6080. Spring.

POUL 5140 POULTRY PROCESSING AND PRODUCTS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. CHEM 2030 or CHEM 2070 or CHEM 2077. Processing, formulating and developing poultry products; includes meat and ingredient chemistry, processing steps and equipment used to create further processed poultry products. Credit is not allowed for both POUL 5140 or POUL 6140.

POUL 5160 PRINCIPLES OF FOOD SAFETY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. BIOL 3200. Identification and control of foodborne hazards in foods of animal origin. Introduction to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. Credit will not be given for both POUL 5160 and POUL 6160. Spring.

POUL 6050 ADVANCED POULTRY FEEDING (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Departmental approval. An advanced study and review of the literature on the application of the principles of nutrition to poultry; the functions of individual nutrients, their deficiency symptoms and their supply in terms of feedstuffs and practical poultry diets. Credit will not be given for both POUL 5050 and POUL 6050. Fall.

POUL 6080 ADVANCED POULTRY HEALTH (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. An advanced study of the prevention, diagnosis, control and treatment of economically important diseases of poultry. Credit will not be given for both POUL 5080 and POUL 6080. Fall.

POUL 6140 POULTRY PROCESSING AND PRODUCTS (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Processing, formulating and developing poultry products; includes meat and ingredient chemistry, processing steps and equipment used to create further processed poultry products. Credit is not allowed for both POUL 6140 or POUL 5140.

POUL 6160 ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF FOOD SAFETY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Departmental approval. An advanced study and literature review of the identification and control of foodborne hazards in foods of animal origin. Introduction to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. Credit will not be given for both POUL 5160 and POUL 6160. Spring.

POUL 7100 SUPERVISED INVESTIGATION (1-4) IND. Departmental approval. Advanced independent investigation in major field of poultry or avian science. Requirements include review of literature, successful and timely completion of research project, and presentation of results in written and/or oral report. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

POUL 7950 GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. Literature in poultry science, food science or related field. Emphasis given to preparation, organization, and presentation of research materials and to reporting current literature in the field. May count either FDSC 7950 or POUL 7950. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

POUL 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN POULTRY SCIENCE (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Critical analysis of classic and current research in poultry science, including literary research and/or data analysis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

POUL 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POULTRY SCIENCE (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Instruction and discussion of current advanced topics associated with poultry science. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

POUL 7980 NON-THESIS RESEARCH (1-4) RES. Departmental approval. enrolled as POUL MAg student. Research conducted as part of the Master of Agricultural degree.

POUL 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Technical laboratory problems related to poultry. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

POUL 8100 GI SYSTEMS AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. POUL 5050. Structure of feedstuffs and strategy in nutrient recovery from the gastrointestinal systems of fowl, swine, and ruminants.

POUL 8150 AVIAN PHYSIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Physiology of organ systems of birds with emphasis on domestic fowl. Fall. Students should have completed a course in animal or human physiology.

POUL 8160 LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN MOLECULAR VIROLOGY (4) LEC. 1. LAB. 9. Pr. BIOL 5220 and BIOL 5230. Departmental approval. Isolation, purification, and identification of viral nucleic acids and proteins. Credit will not be given for both POUL 8160 and CMBL 8160. Odd years. Fall.

POUL 8620 ANAEROBIC BACTERIOLOGY (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 6. Pr. CHEM 6180. Departmental approval. Principles of basic pathogenic anaerobic bacteriology. Basic clinical methodology anaerobic bacterial identification, pathogenesis, current research and literature in anaerobic bacteriology.

POUL 8700 THE LIVING GUT (3) LEC. 3. Coreq. POUL 8620. Basic physiology of intestinal tract. Normal flora and its association with maintenance of homeostasis. Interaction of host intestinal components and microflora at the cellular level. Departmental approval. Summer.

POUL 8960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-4) IND. A) Nutrition, B) Physiology, C) Health, D) Microbiology, E) Processing, F) Product Safety and Quality, G) Teaching, H) Immunonutrition. Course may be repeated with change in topic. Departmental approval.

POUL 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Technical laboratory problems related to poultry. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Rural Sociology Courses

RSOC 3190 FOOD, AGRICULTURE, AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Historical development of the agrifood system, a range of outcomes and impacts from this development, and the current trends in agrifood system structure and organization.

RSOC 3560 ENVIRONMENT, SOCIETY, AND JUSTICE (3) LEC. 3. The course focuses on micro and macro structures influencing environmental problems, and possible pathways for their resolution. The course introduces Environmental Sociology through an action-oriented approach to environmental problems.

RSOC 3620 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Analysis of social organization at the community level. Conceptual framework developed to examine both internal and external forces affecting urban as well as rural communities in the U.S., and to identify strategies to strengthen local capacity to adapt to changing social and economic environments.

RSOC 4410 EXTENSION PROGRAMS AND METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Principles and models of applied social change in U.S. and developing nations. The Cooperative Extension System is analyzed as an educational institution. Fundamental steps in program development and evaluation.

RSOC 4910 DIRECTED FIELD EXPERIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Structured intensive involvement within an agency or organization serving people in communities or rural areas. Supervision is shared between agency personnel and department faculty who plan, consult, discuss, and evaluate student activities and reports.

RSOC 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Individualized study of topics in rural sociology and community development, natural resources and environmental issues conducted in consultation with a faculty member. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

RSOC 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (1-3) LEC. Departmental approval. Investigation of problems in rural sociology and community development, natural resources and environmental issues conducted in consultation with a faculty member. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

RSOC 5510 SOCIAL WELFARE, FAMILY AND POVERTY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. SOCY 1000 or SOCY 1007 or ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Description for Bulletin: Measuring and explaining poverty inequality and their effects on families and society, analysis of anti-poverty programs.

RSOC 5610 RURAL SOCIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Theories and conceptual approaches to rurality in international and domestic contexts. Rural-urban differences in demographic composition, occupational structure, attitudes, and values of rural people and regional cultures. Rural services and institutions as determinants of the quality of life.

RSOC 5640 SOCIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Principles of applied social change at the community level in both industrialized and non-industrialized settings; impacts of economic and technological changes on urban and rural communities; citizen participation in community affairs.

RSOC 5650 SOCIOLOGY OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3) LEC. 3. The social origins of contemporary environmental problems, emergence of environmentalism as a social movement within industrialized nations, and other topical issues.

RSOC 6510 SOCIAL WELFARE, FAMILY AND POVERTY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. SOCY 1000 or SOCY 1007 or ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Description for Bulletin: Measuring and explaining poverty and inequality and their effects on families and society; analysis of anti-poverty programs.

RSOC 6610 RURAL SOCIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Theories and conceptual approaches to rurality in international and domestic contexts. Rural-urban differences in demographic composition, occupational structure, attitudes and values of rural people and regional cultures. Rural services and institutions as determinants of the quality of life.

RSOC 6640 SOCIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. SOCY 1000 or SOCY 1007. Principles of applied social change at the community level in both industrialized and non-industrialized settings; impacts of economic and technological changes on urban and rural communities; and citizen participation in community affairs.

RSOC 6650 SOCIOLOGY OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3) LEC. 3. The social origins of contemporary environmental problems, emergence of environmentalism as a social movement within industrialized nations, and other topical issues.

RSOC 7410 EXTENSION PROGRAMS AND METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Principles and models of applied social change in U.S. and developing nations. The Cooperative Extension Service is analyzed as an educational institution. Fundamental steps in program development and evaluation.

RSOC 7620 SOCIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY (3) LEC. 3. Emphasis on theories, conceptual approaches and methods for studying communities and assessing developmental needs with attention to organizational structure, power structure, decision-making and linkage networks to societal units.

RSOC 7630 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Theories of societal development applied to contemporary issues associated with change in non-industrialized nations. Exploration of institutional, class, and state interests that guide development processes, as well as alternative participatory development strategies.

RSOC 7650 SOCIOLOGY OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3) LEC. 3. The social origins of contemporary environmental problems, emergence of environmentalism as a social movement within industrialized nations, and other topical issues.

RSOC 7700 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. SOCY 3700. Problem identification, hypothesis development and empirical analysis. Quantitative and qualitative procedures for obtaining social data using surveys, direct observation and secondary sources.

RSOC 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (1-3) LEC. Pr., departmental approval. Investigation of a problem in a particular area of interest involving an in-depth review of the literature, a research project, or an outreach education activity. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

RSOC 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. New topic in the area of rural sociology and community development.

RSOC 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. In conjunction with the preparation of a thesis. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Agric Econ. & Rural Sociology

  • DUFFY, PATRICIA A., Professor
  • FIELDS, DEACUE, Professor and Extension Specialist and Chair
  • FOWLER, SAMUEL R., Associate Professor and Extension Economist
  • HARTARSKA, VALENTINA, Professor
  • HITE, DIANE, Professor
  • JOLLY, CURTIS M., Professor
  • KINNUCAN, HENRY W., Alumni Professor
  • MOLNAR, JOSEPH J., Professor
  • NADOLNYAK, DENIS, Associate Professor
  • NELSON, ROBERT G., Professor
  • PATTERSON, PAUL M., Professor and Associate Dean for Instruction
  • PREVATT, JAMES W., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • RUNGE, MAX W., Extension Program Associate
  • SIMPSON III, EUGENE H., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • WILSON, NOBERT L., Associate Professor
  • WOROSZ, MICHELLE, Associate Professor

Crop, Soil & Environmental Sc

  • BEASLEY, JOHN P., Professor and Head
  • BRANTLEY, EVE F., Extension Specialist and Associate Professor
  • CHEN, CHARLES, Associate Professor
  • DUCAR, JOYCE, Extension Specialist & Assistant Professor
  • FENG, YUCHENG, Professor
  • GUERTAL, BETH, Professor
  • HAN, DAVID Y., Extension Specialist and Associate Professor
  • HOWE, JULIE A., Associate Professor
  • HULUKA, GOBENA, Associate Professor
  • JOHNSON, JENNIFER, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist
  • KNAPPENBERGER, THORSTEN, Assistant Professor
  • KNAPPENBERGER, THORSTEN, Assistant Professor
  • LI, STEVE , Ext Specialist & Assistant Professor
  • MCELROY, J. SCOTT, Professor
  • ORTIZ, BRENDA, Extension Specialist and Associate Professor
  • SHANNON, DENNIS A., Professor
  • SHAW, JOEY N., Alumni Professor
  • WATERS, MATT , Assistant Professor
  • WEAVER, DAVID B., Professor

Animal Sciences

  • BERGEN, WERNER G., Professor
  • BRANDEBOURG, TERRY, Assistant Professor
  • BRATCHER, CHRISTY, Associate Professor
  • CHIBA, LEE M., Professor
  • GREENE, L. WAYNE, Professor and Head
  • HUNTINGTON, CAROLYN E., Lecturer & Undergraduate Program Officer
  • KRIESE-ANDERSON, LISA ANN, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist
  • MULVANEY, DONALD R., Associate Professor
  • MUNTIFERING, RUSSELL B., Professor
  • RODNING, SOREN P., Associate Professor and Extension Specialist
  • WAGNER, ELIZABETH L., Associate Professor
  • WANG, LUXIN, Assistant Professor
  • WOWER, JACEK, Professor

Biosystems Engineering

  • ADHIKARI, SUSHIL, Alumni Associate Professor
  • BATCHELOR, WILLIAM, Professor
  • BLERSCH, DAVID, Assistant Professor
  • BUSCHLE-DILLER, GISELA, Professor
  • DAVID, JEREMIAH, Associate Professor
  • DONALD JR, JAMES O., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • DOUGHERTY, MARK, Associate Professor
  • FASINA, OLADIRAN O., Alumni Professor
  • LAMBA, JASMEET, Assistant Professor
  • MCDONALD, TIMOTHY P., Professor
  • SRIVASTAVA, PUNEET, Professor and Butler-Cunningham Eminent Scholar
  • TAYLOR, STEVEN E., Professor and Head
  • WANG, YI, Assistant Professor
  • WANG, YIFEN, Professor

Entomology & Plant Pathology

  • BOWEN, KIRA L., Professor
  • COLEMAN, JEFF, Assistant Professor
  • DE LA FUENTE, LEONARDO, Associate Professor
  • FADAMIRO, HENRY Y., Asst Dean/Dir Global/Alumni Prof
  • FLANDERS, KATHY L., Professor
  • HAGAN, AUSTIN K., Professor
  • HARDY, NATE B. , Assistant Professor
  • HELD, DAVID, Associate Professor
  • HU, XING PING, Professor and Extension Specialist
  • KLOEPPER, JOSEPH W., Professor
  • LAWRENCE, KATHY S., Professor
  • LIU, NANNAN, Professor & Chair
  • MATHIAS, DERRICK, Assistant Professor
  • MURPHY, JOHN F., Professor
  • PARK, SANG-WOOK, Assistant Professor
  • SIKORA, EDWARD, Professor & Extension Specialist
  • SIKORA, EDWARD J., Professor and Extension Specialist

School of Fish/Aqua/Aq Sci

  • ARIAS, COVADONGA R., Professor
  • BULLARD, STEPHEN A., Associate Professor
  • CATALANO, MATTHEW, Assistant Professor
  • CHAPPELL, JESSE A., Associate Professor and Extension Specialist
  • DANIELS, WILLIAM H., Associate Professor
  • DAVIS, DONALD A, Professor
  • DEVRIES, DENNIS R., Professor
  • DUNHAM, REX A., Professor
  • HANSON, TERRILL R., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • IRWIN, ELISE R., Associate Professor
  • JOHNSTON, CAROL E., Professor
  • LIU, ZHANJIANG, Professor and Associate V.P. for Research and Associate Provost
  • PEATMAN, ERIC J., Associate Professor
  • STOECKEL, JAMES A., Associate Professor
  • SWANN, DAVID L., Associate Research Professor
  • SZEDLMAYER, STEPHEN T., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • TERHUNE, JEFFREY S., Associate Professor
  • WALTON, WILLIAM C., Associate Professor and Extension Specialist
  • WILSON, ALAN E., Associate Professor
  • WRIGHT, RUSSELL A., Associate Professor and Extension Specialist

Horticulture

  • CONEVA, ELINA D, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist
  • EAKES, DONALD J., Professor
  • FAIN, GLENN B., Associate Professor
  • FOSHEE, WHEELER G., Associate Professor
  • GILLIAM, CHARLES H., Professor
  • KEEVER, GARY J., Professor
  • KEMBLE, JOSEPH M., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • KESSLER JR, J. RAYMOND, Professor
  • PONDER, HARRY G., Professor
  • ROBINSON, CAROLYN W., Assistant Professor
  • SIBLEY, JEFFREY L., Professor and Head
  • SPIERS, JAY D., Assistant Professor
  • WILLIAMS, J. DAVID, Professor
  • WOODS, FLOYD M., Associate Professor
  • WRIGHT, AMY NOELLE, Associate Professor

Poultry Science

  • BELL, LEONARD, Professor
  • BERRY, WALLACE D., Associate Professor
  • CONNER, DONALD E., Professor and Head
  • CURTIS, PATRICIA A., Professor
  • DOZIER III., WILLIAM A., Professor
  • GIAMBRONE, JOSEPH J., Professor
  • HESS, JOSEPH B., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • HUANG, TUNG-SHI, Professor
  • MACKLIN, KENNETH S., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • MONU, EMEFA, Assistant Professor
  • MOREY, AMIT, Assistant Professor
  • NORTON JR, ROBERT A., Professor
  • PACHECO, WILMER, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist
  • STARKEY, JESSICA, Assistant Professor
  • WEESE, SONDRA JEAN, Professor and Extension Specialist