College of Liberal Arts

JOSEPH AISTRUP, Dean
PAULA BOBROWSKI, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Graduate Studies
CHARLES A. ISRAEL, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
GIOVANNA SUMMERFIELD, Associate Dean for Educational Affairs

Majors in Liberal Arts prepare students for immediate employment after receiving undergraduate degrees, for example, as journalists, public relations experts, archivists, interpreter/translators, curators, social scientists, counselors, fine arts and entertainment industry professionals, education support specialists, management professionals, or technical communicators. Students also receive strong academic backgrounds for graduate study or professional education. The College of Liberal Arts consists of four academic areas, each of which is divided further into departments: 

  • Humanities: English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, and Philosophy, awarding Bachelor of Arts degrees.
  • Fine Arts: Art, Music, and Theatre, awarding Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees.
  • Communication: Communication Disorders and Communication and Journalism, awarding Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees.
  • Behavioral and Social Sciences: Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, awarding Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees.

Becoming a Liberal Arts Major

Entering a Major: Incoming freshmen and external transfer students are admitted directly to the College of Liberal Arts. The following majors have additional admission requirements beyond university admission: Art-BFA, Communication, Communication Disorders, Health Services Administration, Journalism, Music, Public Relations, Media Studies, Social Work, Theatre-BFA. Students should contact the department that houses their intended major to determine specific entrance requirements. 

Declaring a Major: All students must declare a major by the end of the semester in which they complete 65 semester hours of credit, including transfer and other college credit. Students transferring into the College of Liberal Arts with 65 or more semester hours of credit must declare a major upon admission. Before a major is declared, students will follow the requirements for the College of Liberal Arts and will be identified as pre-majors in a curriculum or by the designation UNLA for undeclared students.

Required Courses for All Liberal Arts Majors

Most majors in the College of Liberal Arts require students to complete a one-year sequence in a foreign language. Students are placed into each sequence based on results of a placement exam administered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures prior to their enrollment at Auburn. Students pursuing BFA degrees in Art and Theatre are exempted from the foreign language sequence requirement.

Policies for Dual Degrees and Double Majors

To earn a second baccalaureate degree, students must complete a separate body of knowledge appropriate for the degree. The Dean’s Office in the College of Liberal Arts determines when it is possible for students to earn a second baccalaureate degree. Auburn University academic policy stipulates the minimum hours necessary in addition to the primary degree or curriculum. The College of Liberal Arts requires that, at a minimum, 30 additional hours of non-overlapping course work must be accomplished in the second baccalaureate degree program.

To earn a double major, students must complete all the major courses in both majors. Of these major courses, at least 20 hours of each major must be unique, rather than being used as major, support, or core courses in both majors. If at least 20 hours of unique courses do not exist for each of the two majors, students cannot pursue a double major.

For complete information on dual degrees and double major requirements, please see the Academic Policies section.

Special Academic Opportunities

To augment the learning experiences available through majors in the College of Liberal Arts, students can take advantage of the following possibilities:

  • Dual Degrees with the College of Engineering. Students can receive a degree from a Liberal Arts major and a degree from a major in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. To ensure that all requirements are met, students should see advisors in both colleges. Typically, five to six academic years are necessary to complete dual degrees.
  • Pre-Law Study. Most majors in Liberal Arts are accepted by law schools as appropriate preparation for the study of law. However, students should consult with the pre-law advisor in Haley Center 7002 in preparing for law school admission and the study of law. The pre-law advisor will suggest the most useful courses to take.
  • Pre-Health Study. Most majors in Liberal Arts are accepted as preparation for professional degrees in health, including medicine, dentistry, optometry, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Generally, students will need to take particular courses in science, mathematics, and philosophy as their university core requirements. They will also need to take additional courses in science and mathematics not required by most Liberal Arts majors and attend a Pre-Health Professional Orientation course offered during fall semester. To ensure they complete the necessary requirements and to get assistance in applying to graduate or professional programs in health fields, students should meet with the pre-health advisors in the College of Science and Mathematics. Students should also consult with advisors in the College of Liberal Arts and in the departments that house their majors.
  • Teacher Certification through the College of Education. Students holding baccalaureate degrees in English, history, French, or Spanish may gain teaching certification through enrolling in the Alternative Master’s Certification Program in the College of Education. Upon successful completion of the program, students are awarded a master’s degree in education (MEd), and they will be eligible to apply for Alabama Class A certification (master’s level certificate).
  • University Honors College. Students with extraordinarily high academic aptitude can receive individual learning opportunities through the Honors College. For more information, see the “Academics Policies” section.
  • Study Abroad. Students can gain course credit either through class instruction or internship in Study Abroad programs. For more information, students can contact the Office of International Programs or the departments / colleges that house these Study Abroad opportunities.
  • Cooperative Education Programs. Students receive opportunities to integrate classroom education with work experience in Cooperative Education Programs. Students alternate each semester between attending classes and working for companies. Cooperative Education Programs are available in the Departments of Art, English (Professional Writing and Public Writing track), Political Science (Health Services Administration and Public Administration majors) Psychology, and Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work. Interested students should contact the director of the Cooperative Education Program.
  • The Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities. Students may be interested in the programs and other activities sponsored through the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities.  As described on its website, the mission of the Center is “to strengthen the bonds between the College of Liberal Arts and the public by creating and implementing arts and humanities programs that explore our individual and collective experiences, values, and identities through the past, in the present, and for the future. The Center also creates occasions and space for dialogue, intellectual community, and cross-disciplinary scholarship."

Undergraduate Degrees

The College of Liberal Arts and the School of Fine arts offer academic majors, programs, and options in more than 30 fields. These are listed below.

Graduate Degrees

Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in English, History, Psychology, and Public Administration and Public Policy, and a PhD track is offered in Applied Economics. The Doctor of Audiology degree is offered in Communication Disorders. Master of Arts degrees are offered in English, Spanish, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Communication. Master of Science degrees are offered in Communication Disorders, Economics, and Psychology. The degrees of Master of Communication Disorders, Master of Community Planning, Master of Hispanic Studies, Master of Public Administration, and Master of Technical and Professional Communication are also offered. These degree programs are described in the Graduate School section.

Majors

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 1000/1003 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Social Science I Core. Introduction to the study of human evolution, early civilizations, and globalization; linguistic and cultural problems using the four sub-fields of anthropology, including biological/physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics.

ANTH 1007 HONORS INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Social Science I Core. Introduction to the study of human evolution, early civilizations, and globalization: linguistic and cultural problems using the four sub-fields of anthropology, including biological/physical anthropology archaeology, cultural anthropology and linguistics. Credit will not be given for both ANTH 1000 and ANTH 1007.

ANTH 2000 ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007) or (SOCY 1000 or SOCY 1007) or GEOG 1100. Approaches, techniques, and strategies for carrying out ethnographic research and analyzing qualitative data in the social sciences.

ANTH 2500 ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOBAL STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Any Social Science Core course. Broad-based study of processes and problems that transcend national boundaries, including global historical processes, politics, migrations, trade, disease, environmental change, and sustainability.

ANTH 2700 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF ASIA (3) LEC. 3. Any Social Science Core course. Introduction to the traditions, religions, histories, and nation-states of the people of Asia, using a cultural approach.

ANTH 2800 ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA (3) LEC. 3. Any Social Science Core course. Anthropological perspectives on African Diasporas. Diaspora. Archaeological, ethnohistorical, and contemporary research exploring identity, symbols, power, and social relations in the lives of enslaved Africans and descendants in the Caribbean, Latin America and North America.

ANTH 2900 WORLD PREHISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Explore broad patterns in human prehistory over the past 10,000 years, including the origins of culture, religion, domestication and agriculture, writing, cities, and states.

ANTH 3000 CULTURE, MARRIAGE, AND THE FAMILY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Role and meaning of kinship and its universal and particularistic features in human society.

ANTH 3100 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Contemporary perspectives in cultural anthropology, emphasizing sociolinguistics, discourse, mythology, and folklore.

ANTH 3200 ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Gender relations and representations in different cultures, historical periods, and discourses.

ANTH 3300 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Overview of biological anthropology, including evolutionary theory and genetics, primatology, human origins, and biological variation of contemporary human populations. Concepts will be applied during in-class exercises and discussions.

ANTH 3310 RACE AND RACISM: BIOCULTURAL HISTORY OF HUMAN VARIATION (3) LEC. 3. Core Social Science. Deconstructs the myths of biologicial races by examining human population bariation from an anthropological and evolutionary perspective. Students will explore the social history of racism and contemporary issues related to race and human diversity. May count either ANTH 3310 or ANTH 2310.

ANTH 3400 ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SCHOOL (6) LEC. 6. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Field methods, including archaeological surveying and excavation procedures at selected locations.

ANTH 3410 APPLIED & PRACTICING ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Explores application and practice of anthropology in settings such as cultural resource management, museums, social and environmental policy, and healthcare. This course emphasizes how careers in anthropology contribute to resolving contemporary social problems.

ANTH 3500 ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Archaeology is the study of human societies based on the material remains they left behind. This course explores the history, theories, methods, and applications of archaeology.

ANTH 3600 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Any Social Science Core course. Explores biological and cultural dimensions of global health from an anthropological perspective. Topics include the political economy of health, cross-cultural healing traditions, pluralistic medical systems, and evolutionary medicine.

ANTH 3610 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Explores standards of practice in forensic anthropology and analysis of case studies. May count either ANTH 3610 or ANTH 2600.

ANTH 3700 POLITICAL ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr., SSCI and junior standing. Problems in ethnoecology, cultural ecology, political ecology and environmentalism.

ANTH 3810 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Explores archaeological evidence for the history of indigenous peoples in North America during the past 10,000 years.

ANTH 3850 MISSISSIPPIAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Diversity and complexity of late prehistoric cultures of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States.

ANTH 3900 BIOARCHAEOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007). Archaeologically-derived skeletal remains provide essential information for reconstructing broad patterns of human health and behavior over time. Students will learn to apply methods and theory in social bioarchaeology to understand demography, diet, disease, and physical activity in past populations.

ANTH 3950 CURATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. History, legislation, and ethical concerns associated with the accumulation and curation of archaeological collections.

ANTH 4310 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Major thinkers in anthropology and their theoretical models considered in historical perspective.

ANTH 4910 LABORATORY PROGRAMS (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007 and ANTH 2100. Investigation a specific archaeological problem or problems, involving students in laboratory techniques and research.

ANTH 4920 INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) AAB/INT. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Internship with a federal or state agency for practical work or research on anthropological problems.

ANTH 4930 FIELD PROBLEMS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 1. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Practical investigation of a specific field problem in anthropology.

ANTH 4940 LABORATORY PRACTICUM (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 1. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007 and ANTH 2100. Analysis, preservation, cataloging, and restoration of archaeological materials. May count either ANTH 4940 or ANTH 3910.

ANTH 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Specific topics in anthropology not covered in other courses. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ANTH 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. 3. Pr. Honors College. ANTH 1000 or Departmental approval. Specific topics in anthropology not covered in other courses. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ANTH 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. ANTH 1000 or Departmental approval.. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ANTH 5100 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. or junior standing.Comparative anthropological, cultural, and ethnohistorical overview of Native American cultures of North America, emphasizing change and contact situations.

ANTH 5200 GENDER DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. or junior standing. Role of gender and culture in Third World development from an anthropological perspective.

ANTH 5600 CULTURE, MEDICINE, AND POWER (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. or junior standing. Power in the context of illness and healing at local, national, and international levels.

ANTH 5700 CRITIQUE OF DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 3700. Meanings and structures of national and international development.

ANTH 5930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Directed study course in anthropology that allows students to explore concepts not covered in other courses. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ANTH 5970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Examination of a specific problem in ethnographic methods, theory, and cultural analysis.

ANTH 6100 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3) LEC. 3. Advanced comparative cultural and ethnohistorical overview of the Native American cultures of North America, emphasizing change and contact situations.

ANTH 6200 GENDER DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Role of gender and culture in Third World economic development from an anthropological perspective.

ANTH 6600 CULTURE MEDICINE AND POWER (3) LEC. 3. Power in the context of illness and healing at local, national, and international levels.

ANTH 6700 CRITIQUE OF DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Meanings and structures of national and international development in historical perspective, including cultural values, power, inequality, and resistance.

ANTH 6930 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) IND. Directed study course in anthropology that allows students to explore concepts not covered in other courses. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ANTH 6970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1003 or ANTH 1007. Examination of a specific problem in ethnographic methods, theory, and cultural analysis.

Art Courses

ARTS 1030 BASIC CERAMICS (3) STU. 6. Instruction in principles of three-dimensional design and sculpture. Clay is used to explore techniques of casting, constructing, modeling, and wheel throwing. Work with glazes and surface decoration. Not open to ARTF, ARTH, and ATLA majors.

ARTS 1040 BASIC PAINTING (3) STU. 6. Instruction in painting concepts, materials, and techniques. Water-based paints and other media are used to explore a variety of approaches and subject matter. Not open to ARTF, ARTH, and ATLA majors.

ARTS 1110 DRAWING I (3) AAB/STU. 6. Basic drawing with emphasis on accurate observation, pictorial organization, and the depiction of space; development of drawing skills using various black and white media.

ARTS 1210 2-D DESIGN FOR STUDIO ART (3) STU. 6. Elements and principles of basic two-dimensional design. Emphasis on composition, color theory, and craftsmanship.

ARTS 1220 3-D DESIGN FOR STUDIO ART (3) STU. 6. Elements and principles of basic three-dimensional design. Emphasis on spatial organization, color, media exploration and craftsmanship.

ARTS 1250 ORIENTATION TO STUDIO ART FOR THE MAJOR (2) LEC. 2. Studio Art Majors and Minors or Departmental Approval. Introduction to the visual arts, critique strategies, studio safety, portfolio development, writing, and careers in the arts.

ARTS 1510/1513 LOOKING AT ART: APPROACHES TO INTERPRETATION (3) LEC. 3. Introduces the fundamental structures of the art world and multiple approaches to looking at and responding to art.

ARTS 1710 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY I (3) LEC. 3. Fine Arts Core. Introduction to major art traditions of the world, from Paleolithic times to AD/CE 1000.

ARTS 1717 HONORS INTRODUCTION INTO ART HISTORY I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Fine Arts Core. Introduction to major art traditions of the world, from Paleolithic times to AD/CE 1000. Credit will not be given for both ARTS 1710 and ARTS 1717.

ARTS 1720/1723 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II (3) LEC. 3. Fine Arts Core. Introduction to world art, c.1000 to c.1700. Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Europe with Islamic and non-Western art of the same time period.

ARTS 1727 HONORS INTRO ART HISTORY II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Fine Arts Core. An introduction to world art, c. 1000 to c. 1700. Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Europe with Islamic and non-Western art of the same period. Credit will not be given for both ARTS 1720 and ARTS 1727.

ARTS 1730 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY III (3) LEC. 3. Fine Arts Core. Major works of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Rococo period through the 20th century. Emphasis on styles and social, political and cultural relationships.

ARTS 1737 HONORS INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY III (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Fine Arts Core. Major works of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Rococo period through the 20th century. Emphasis on styles and social, political and cultural relationships. Credit will not be given for both ARTS 1730 and ARTS 1737.

ARTS 2210 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY (3) AAB/STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 or ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 or ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1210. or Departmental approval.Fine art photographic concepts and techniques including camera operation, tonal control of black and white prints, presentations of historical and contemporary photography.

ARTS 2310 PAINTING I (3) AAB/STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 or ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 or ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1210 or Departmental approval. Instruction in painting concepts, materials, and methods.

ARTS 2410 PRINTMAKING: RELIEF (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 or ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 or ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1210 or Departmental approval. Instruction to relief printmaking. Studio work supplemented with lectures, critiques, and readings.

ARTS 2510 INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE (3) AAB/STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 or ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 or ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1220 or Departmental approval. Survey of the materials, processes, and issues involved in the production of contemporary object-oriented sculpture. Focus on problem solving and presentations of contemporary sculpture.

ARTS 2610 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ART (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 or ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 or ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1210 or Departmental approval. An introduction to the skills and concepts of digital art forms such as imaging, time, and sound, using computer-based tools and techniques.

ARTS 2810 CERAMICS I (3) AAB/STU. 9. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 or ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 or ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1220 or Departmental approval. Introduction to handforming methods for sculpture and vessel forms in clay. Work with glazes and firing.

ARTS 2970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN STUDIO ART AND ART HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Topics in studio art and art history. Focus will vary according to the instructor. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARTS 3100 INTERMEDIA (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 2510 and (ARTS 2810 or ARTS 3820) and (ARTS 2210 and ARTS 2310 and ARTS 2410) and (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727). Introduction to concepts and visual problem solving in mixed media.

ARTS 3110 FIGURE DRAWING (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 1110 or Departmental approval. The human figure as form and as compositional element. Measuring and sighting for proportion. Drawing from casts, skeletons, and nude models.

ARTS 3140 ADVANCED DRAWING I (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 3110. Concepts, materials and techniques with emphasis on the development of a personal vision and individual approach. Nude models may be used.

ARTS 3150 ADVANCED DRAWING II (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 3140 and (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 and ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737). Medium and subject determined by student with approval of instructor. Emphasis on strengthening the student's aesthetic awareness and technical skills.

ARTS 3220 DIGITAL AND COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY (3) AAB/STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 and ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and (ARTS 2210 or GDES 3210) or Departmental approval. Concepts and practices of contemporary art photography including digital production techniques and color photographic theory.

ARTS 3230 INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 and ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717 and ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727 and ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and (ARTS 2210 or GDES 3210) or Departmental approval. Intermediate study of photographic processes with emphasis on technique, classroom craftsmanship, medium and large camera formats, approaches to content and researching concepts to inform studio production.

ARTS 3320 PAINTING II (3) AAB/STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 2310 or Departmental approval. Instruction in painting concepts, materials, and techniques with emphasis on the development of technical skills and a personal vision and individual approach.

ARTS 3330 PAINTING III (3) AAB/STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 3140 and ARTS 3320 or Departmental approval. Medium and subject determined by student and instructor. Emphasis on strengthening aesthetic awareness and technical skills. Nude models may be used.

ARTS 3420 PRINTMAKING: INTAGLIO (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1210 or Departmental approval. Introduction to intaglio printmaking. Studio work with lectures, critiques, and readings.

ARTS 3430 PRINTMAKING: SERIGRAPHY (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and (ARTS 2410 or ARTS 3420) or Departmental approval. Introduction to water based screen-printing. Studio work supplemented with lectures, critiques, and reading.

ARTS 3520 SCULPTURE AS OBJECT (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 2510 or Departmental approval. Continued research into the materials, processes and issues involved in the production of mixed media sculpture. Readings and discussions on recent developments in the field of sculpture.

ARTS 3530 SCULPTURE AS SPACE (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 2510 or Departmental approval. Survey of the methods, technologies (including sound and light), and issues involved in the production of contemporary sculptural installations, environments, and sites. Class discussion of student projects, with readings, presentations, and videos that address current art practice.

ARTS 3650 HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Introduction to the history and theory of photography from its 19th-century origins to contemporary global practices.

ARTS 3660 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ART IN EUROPE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of the architecture, painting, and sculpture in 18th-century Europe.

ARTS 3670 CONSTRUCTING RACE IN THE VISUAL ARTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of the role of visual imagery in inscribing and. challenging racial hierarchies in the history of art.

ARTS 3680 20TH-CENTURY ART II: 1945-2000 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. An introduction to the artists, movements, institutions, concepts, and themes of late 20th-century art.

ARTS 3690 ARTS OF AFRICA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Introduction to the art, artists, themes and issues in African art from the pre-colonial period to the contemporary era.

ARTS 3700 ART OF THE UNITED STATES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of architecture, painting, and sculpture from colonial to recent times. Selected movements and works are considered in relationship both to European and to indigenous conditions and attitudes.

ARTS 3710 ANCIENT ART OF THE WEST (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Examination of major art traditions of the ancient world, including for example: Egypt, Near East, Aegean, Greece, and Rome.

ARTS 3720 MEDIEVAL ART OF THE WEST (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of major art traditions of the West from the fall of Rome to CE 1400, with a selective focus on the major art traditions, including Migration period, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, Gothic, and Italo-Byzantine.

ARTS 3730 RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of the architecture, painting, and sculpture of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy.

ARTS 3740 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ART IN EUROPE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of the architecture, painting, and sculpture of 17th-century Europe.

ARTS 3750 19TH CENTURY ART (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Introduction to major art movements from Neo-Classicism to Post-Impressionism and Art Nouveau.

ARTS 3760 20TH CENTURY ART (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of major developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe and the United States from 1900 to recent times.

ARTS 3770 ANCIENT AMERICAN ART (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of major art traditions of nuclear America, from Mexico to the Andes, from the beginnings to CE 1550.

ARTS 3780 RENAISSANCE ART OF NORTHERN EUROPE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Study of the art of Northern Europe, CE 1300-1600. Major themes include cultural interchange, court and bourgeois patronage, rise of graphic arts, and the development of the art market.

ARTS 3790 ARTS OF ASIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Introduction to major art traditions of Asia from the beginnings to the present.

ARTS 3800 ISSUES AND CRITICISM IN CONTEMPORARY ART (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737). and one 3000-level art history class or Departmental approval. Readings and discussions about art since 1970.

ARTS 3810 GENDER AND THE VISUAL ARTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Introduction to gender issues in the visual arts in historical and contemporary contexts. Examines the cultural notions of both masculine and feminine gender roles at play in works of art and explores key issues that have affected women's production of works of art in the past and present.

ARTS 3820 CERAMICS II (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 1110 and ARTS 1220 and (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or Departmental approval. Introduction to wheel-thrown pottery. Presentation of historical and contemporary contexts for fine arts ceramics. Work with glazes and firing.

ARTS 3830 CERAMICS III (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) or (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) or (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and (ARTS 2810 or ARTS 3820) or Departmental approval. Individual approaches to ceramic sculpture and vessel forms, with emphasis on stylistic and conceptual concerns.

ARTS 3920 INTERNSHIP IN STUDIO ART/ART HISTORY (3) PRA. 15. SU. Junior standing.. Junior standing and 3.0 GPA in major and completion of at least two 3000-level courses in ARTF, ARTH, or ATLA major. Internships appropriate to the major with a departmental-approved sponsor providing hands-on, practical learning experiences in a professional setting.

ARTS 4100 SEMINAR IN PRE-MODERN ART HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. 6 hours of 3000-level art history courses. Or departmental approval. Examination of varying topics in art history from the ancient era until 1750 CE. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARTS 4150 SEMINAR IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. 6 hours of 3000-level art history courses. Or departmental approval. Examination of varying topics in modern and contemporary art history, 1750 CE-present. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARTS 4240 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 3220 and ARTS 3230 and (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737). Advanced investigations of theory, history, and methods to inform photographic practice. Emphasis on production of mature work and individual artistic identity. Frequent individual and group critiques. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ARTS 4340 PAINTING IV (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 3330 and (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737). Advanced painting with medium and subject idea determined by student with approval of the instructor. Emphasis on strengthening the student's awareness and technical skills as a maturing painter. Nude models may be used. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ARTS 4440 ADVANCED PRINTMAKING (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 2410 and ARTS 3420 and ARTS 3430 and (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737). Individual research in printmaking. Students focus on conceptual and technical development through continued research in relief, intaglio, or screen-printing. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ARTS 4540 ADVANCED SCULPTURE (3) STU. 6. Pr. ARTS 3520 and ARTS 3530 and (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737). Advanced investigation of the history, theory and methods of sculptural practice. Individual instruction and supervision of research and reading. Frequent individual and group critiques. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ARTS 4700 SENIOR CAPSTONE: ART HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Declared ARTH major or minor and completion of 18 hours of 3000-level art history courses. Capstone course for ARTH majors.

ARTS 4840 CERAMICS IV (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 1710 or ARTS 1717) and (ARTS 1720 or ARTS 1727) and (ARTS 1730 or ARTS 1737) and ARTS 3810 and ARTS 3820 and ARTS 3830. Continuation of ARTS 3830 with increased emphasis on individual stylistic and conceptual concerns. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ARTS 4850 PROFESSIONAL STUDIO PRACTICES (2) LEC. 2. Instruction in portfolio preparation, professional practices, information on studio art careers and graduate study. Must have completed nine credit hours in one concentration; taken concurrently with 4000-level studio in concentration prior to ARTS 4980.

ARTS 4860 BFA CRITIQUE SEMINAR (1) LEC. 1. SU. Junior standing.. Junior standing. Open to ARTF majors only. Must completed the 2000-level course in degree concentration (ARTS 2210 or or ARTS 2310 or ARTS 2410 or ARTS 2510 or ARTS 2810) and must have completed one 3000 level course in degree concentration(ARTS 3220 or 3230) or (ARTS 3320) or (ARTS 3420 or ARTS 3430) or (ARTS 3520 or 3530) or (ARTS 3820). Rigorous group critiques of artwork produced in media concentration courses, discussions and writing about art, art documentation, and exhibition practices. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ARTS 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (2-3) IND. Pr., Open only to ARTS students who have shown ability, initiative, and industry. Departmental approval and 3.0 minimum GPA in 3000-level ARTS courses in area of directed study. Directed studies are offered in painting, printmaking, sculpture, art history, photography, and ceramics. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARTS 4950 BA STUDIO ART CAPSTONE (1) LEC. 1. SU. Students must have Senior Standing and have completed a minimum of 39 hours in the Major. Professional skills development and career strategies for BA Studio Art Majors.

ARTS 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) LEC. Pr. Honors College. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ARTS 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN STUDIO ART AND ART HISTORY (2-3) AAB. Pr., Departmental approval. Topics in studio art and art history. Focus will vary according to the instructor. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARTS 4980 SENIOR PROJECT FOR STUDIO ARTS (3) STU. 6. Pr. (ARTS 2210 and ARTS 2310) or (ARTS 2210 and ARTS 2410) or (ARTS 2310 and ARTS 2410) and ARTS 2510 and (ARTS 2810 or ARTS 3820). And three additional courses in a single studio art concentration. Must be taken in the student's final semester. Directed terminal studio project with faculty-approved choice of content and medium. Project will be exhibited.

ARTS 4997 HONORS RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Communication Disorders Courses

CMDS 2500/2503 COMMUNICATION DISORDERS IN SOCIETY (2) LEC. 2. Information on stuttering, speech, language, voice disorders and hearing impairment and how to interact with individuals with communication disorders.

CMDS 3000 INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH PATHOLOGY-AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Survey of the field of speech pathology-audiology. Includes history of the profession, the inter-relatedness of the various pathologies, general principles of evaluation and therapy and the profession itself.

CMDS 3400 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF SPEECH (3) LEC. 3. The study of anatomy and physiology of speech production including respiratory, laryngeal and articulatory-resonance systems and the process swallowing. Speech acoustics will be introduced.

CMDS 3410 PHONETICS (3) LEC. 3. Principles of phonetics and their application to speech.

CMDS 3560 NEUROANATOMY FOR COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system as it relates to speech, language, hearing and swallowing function and disorders.

CMDS 4400 ADULT NEUROGENIC COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Study of the disorders of speech, language, and swallowing in adults occurring as a result of CNS pathologies and their evaluation and treatment.

CMDS 4510 ARTICULATION DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Principles of normal and deviant articulation acquisition.

CMDS 4520 LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (3) LEC. 3. First language acquisition in childhood and its change throughout the life span.

CMDS 4530 FLUENCY DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Principles of fluent and disfluent verbal behavior.

CMDS 4540 VOCAL DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Principles of normal and deviant vocal behavior.

CMDS 4560 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT LANGUAGE DISORDER (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4520. Departmental approval. Overview of research dealing with the nature, assessment and treatment of language disorders in child and adolescent populations.

CMDS 4580 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PROCEDURES IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY (3) LEC. 3, CLN/LEC. 30. Pr. CMDS 4510 and CMDS 4520. Orientation to clinical activities, management methods and preparation of professional reports.

CMDS 4600 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Principles of auditory reception and the problems involved in measuring, evaluating and conserving hearing.

CMDS 4620 HEARING REHABILITATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600. Departmental approval. Rehabilitation problems of children and adults in the area of auditory training, speech reading and speech conservation; includes clinical practice.

CMDS 4650 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PROCEDURES IN AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600. Audiological instrumentation and test procedures.

CMDS 4910 CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY (1) PRA. 1. Pr. CMDS 4580. Departmental approval.. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

CMDS 4930 DIRECTED STUDY IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Directed learning experience in communication disorders involving bibliographic research, writing, gaining expertise with laboratory/clinical procedures or conducting directed research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CMDS 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval.. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

CMDS 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) RES. Pr. Honors College. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CMDS 5810 PRIVATE PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Concepts and strategies for private practice in the areas of clinical and industrial audiology.

CMDS 7500 CLINICAL PROBLEMS IN SPEECH (1) PRA. 1. Pr. CMDS 4580 and CMDS 4910. Clinical practicum in evaluation and treatment of individuals with speech-language disorders. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

CMDS 7510 ADVANCED ARTICULATION/PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4510. Empirical and theoretical bases for articulartory pathologies.

CMDS 7520 LANGUAGE DISORDERS: BIRTH TO FIVE (3) LEC. 3. Empirical and theoretical bases for evaluation and treatment of language disorders for the birth to five population.

CMDS 7530 ADVANCED FLUENCY DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4530. Empirical and theoretical bases for dysfluency disorders, diagnoses and therapies.

CMDS 7540 ADVANCED VOICE DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4540. Emperical and theoretical bases for voice pathologies, diagnoses and therapies.

CMDS 7550 ADULT APHASIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4520. Empirical and theoretical bases for adult language disorders associated with CNS pathologies, diagnoses and therapies.

CMDS 7560 CRANIOFACIAL ANOMALIES (3) LEC. 3. A review of syndromic and non-syndromic craniofacial disorders including cleft lip/palate. Assessment and treatment of speech and language problems associated with these anomalies is emphasized.

CMDS 7570 EVALUATION OF RESEARCH IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Survey of experimental designs and statistical procedures used in speech-language pathology/audiology literature for consumers of research.

CMDS 7590 LANGUAGE DISORDERS: SCHOOL-AGE (3) LEC. 3. Empirical and theoretical bases for evaluation and treatment of language disorders for school-age children through adolescence.

CMDS 7600 CLINICAL PROBLEMS IN HEARING (2) LEC. 2. Pr. CMDS 4650 and CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

CMDS 7700 CLINICAL PROBLEM SOLVING I (2) LEC. 2. This course will help students develop problem-solving skills that can be applied to clinical practice in Speech-Language Pathology.

CMDS 7720 CLINICAL PROBLEM SOLVING II (2) LEC. 2. This course will promoted advanced problem-solving skills that can be applied to clinical practice in Speech-Language Pathology.

CMDS 7740 CLINICAL PROBLEM SOLVING III (2) LEC. 2. This course will promoted advanced problem-solving skills that can be applied to clinical practice in Speech-Language Pathology.

CMDS 7810 MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 7800. Empirical and theoretical bases for motor speech disorders, diagnoses and therapies.

CMDS 7820 DYSPHAGIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 7800. The role of speech-language pathology in diagnosing and treating swallowing disorders in children and adults. Emphasis will be placed upon clinical and instrumental assessment and treatment strategies.

CMDS 7840 AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Process and specific equipment involved in assessment, prescription and intervention with adults and children who are unable to use traditional communication modes.

CMDS 7860 SPEECH SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 3550. Acoustic properties of speech, physiology and perception of the speech signal, and an orientation to instrumentation used in speech science.

CMDS 7920 INTERNSHIP IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY (5) LEC. 5. SU. Completion of all academic course work. Successful completion of comprehensive exams or enrollment in graduate thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

CMDS 7930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Conferences, readings, research or reports in a specialized area of communication disorders. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

CMDS 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR (1-3) SEM. Advanced treatment of contemporary topics and trends, as well as current research aspects of audiology and speech- language pathology. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

CMDS 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-5) MST. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

CMDS 8100 HEARING SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Departmental approval. Introduction to instrumentation and calibration of audiometric equipment. Auditory perception in normal-hearing and hearing impaired listeners.

CMDS 8110 AUDITORY PHYSIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600. Departmental approval. Detailed study of the anatomy and physiology of the human auditory, and vestibular system over the lifespan.

CMDS 8120 AUDIOLOGY CLINICAL METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Use of audiometric equipment, administering audiological tests, recording test results, and interpreting test findings, including otoscopy, and cerumen management.

CMDS 8200 DIAGNOSTIC AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4650. Basic and advanced audiometric techniques to assess auditory system's site of lesion, including otoscopy, cerumen management, otoacoustic emssions and immittance.

CMDS 8210 MEDICAL ASPECTS OF HEARING DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Departmental approval. Study of the disorders of hearing including their medical diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment.

CMDS 8220 AMPLIFICATION I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Departmental approval. Background and development of hearing aids and other amplification systems; performance standards and measurement techniques; selection, fitting and dispensing procedures

CMDS 8230 CLINICAL LEVEL I (2) LEC. 2. Pr. CMDS 4650. Didactic and practical training for performing audiological testing and patient management including speech and language development and characteristcs across lifespan.

CMDS 8300 CENTRAL AUDITIORY PROCESSING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Selected clinical procedures in audiology, including electrophysiologic and behavioral tests of central auditory functioning.

CMDS 8310 AURAL REHABILITATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Departmental approval. Psychosocial aspects on hearing loss; clinical and therapeutic management of older persons with hearing disorders including counseling of the hearing-impaired and their families.

CMDS 8320 CLINICAL LEVEL II (2) LEC. 2. Pr. CMDS 8230. Didactic and practical training in use of instrumentation for testing, programming, fitting and verifying amplification.

CMDS 8400 PEDIATRIC AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Departmental approval. Normal development of speech, language and hearing losses' effect on communication, etiologic factors, screening, audiologic assessment, differential diagnosis and clinical management.

CMDS 8410 AURAL HABILITATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. The parameters involved in the management of hearing-impaired school-aged children.

CMDS 8420 AMPLIFICATION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 8220. Review of recent trends in hearing aid technology including digital and Programmable instruments.

CMDS 8430 CLINICAL LEVEL III (2) LEC. 2. Pr. CMDS 8230 and CMDS 8320. Didactic and practical training for selection, administration, and intepretation of behavioral and electrophysiologic tests, including auditory processing disorders.

CMDS 8500 ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL PROCEDURES IN AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Selected neurophysiological clinical procedures in audiology, including electronystagmography and auditory evoked potentials.

CMDS 8510 CLINICAL LEVEL IV (2) LEC. 2. Pr. CMDS 8230 and CMDS 8320 and CMDS 8430. Didactic and practical training for selecting, conducting, and interpreting tests to identify disorders of balance and other auditory related systems.

CMDS 8520 HEARING CONSERVATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 8310. Studies the effects of noise on auditory system and implementation of hearing conservation programs in industry, schools and the military.

CMDS 8570 EVALUATION OF RESEARCH IN AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Survey of experimental designs and statistical procedures used in audiology research.

CMDS 8600 BALANCE DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 4600 and CMDS 4620. Detailed coverage of the assessment and treatment of patients with balance disorders using nystagmography and other techniques.

CMDS 8610 IMPLANT TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Detailed study of the assessment and treatment of patients with cochlear implants.

CMDS 8620 OUTCOME MEASURES IN AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMDS 6120. Application of research methodology to demonstrate efficacy in clinical service delivery in all areas of audiologic practice.

CMDS 8630 COUNSELING IN AUDIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Advanced course in the counseling component of rehabilitative audiology.

CMDS 8700 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES (3) LEC. 3. Legal and ethical issues in clinical audiology.

CMDS 8800 THE NEUROLOGICAL BASES OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3) LEC. 3. Anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system as it relates to speech, language and hearing function and disorders.

CMDS 8810 PRIVATE PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Concepts and strategies for private practice in the areas of clinical and industrial audiology.

CMDS 8910 CLINICAL PROBLEMS IN HEARING (2) LEC. 2. Pr. CMDS 4650 and CMDS 4600. Departmental approval. Clinical practicum involving evaluation and management of patients of all ages with disorders of auditory, vestibular, and other auditory related systems.

CMDS 8920 CLINICAL INTERNSHIP (5) INT. 5. SU. Pr. CMDS 8910. Intensive clinical experience at off-campus setting up to 20 hours per week of supervised practicum.

CMDS 8940 CLINICAL RESIDENCY (6) INT. 6. SU. Pr. CMDS 8920. A full time, supervised, nine month residency at an off-campus facility that provides audiological services. Fall, Spring.

CMDS 8950 AUDIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS (3) LEC. 3. Discussion/Seminar in timely clinical issues in audiology, clinical problem solving and case studies in contemporary audiologic service delivery.

CMDS 8980 CAPSTONE PROJECT (1) IND. 1. A third year project involving applied clinical research or development of an innovative clinical procedure.

Communication and Journalism Courses

CMJN 2100/2103 CONCEPTS IN COMMUNICATIONS AND JOURNALISM (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 1. Introduction to the basic principles of various communication forms, the dominant communication theories, and communication industries. May count either CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103.

CMJN 2910 COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM PRACTICUM (1-3) PRA. SU. Departmental Approval. Practical experiences in potential career fields gained while working in professional settings. One to three hours variable credit. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

CMJN 3110 SPORTS MEDIA RELATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Focuses on the major concepts and theories of the management sports media relations. Will include discussion of issues, philosophies and cases. May count either sections CMJN 3110 or MDIA 4350.

CMJN 3210 NEWS AND SPORTS ANNOUNCING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103 or Departmental approval. This class focuses on the theory and practical technique of studio and field announcing. Primary emphasis will be placed on announcing for news and sports. Additional attention will be given to voice over announcing.

CMJN 3350/3353 VISUAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Visual literacy, cognition, aesthetics, critical evaluation, and technology in human communication, with emphasis on impact of visual media in informative, interpretive, and persuasive message.

CMJN 3410 INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS VIDEO PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 2, LST. 1. Introduction to multi-camera live sports production, video and audio editing techniques, how to operate equipment, create basic animated graphics, learn work crew positions and understand a script. Students will complete work for the SEC Network and War Eagle Productions.

CMJN 3650 RHETORIC OF SPORTS (3) LEC. 3. Examination of sports in the public sphere, using rhetorical theories to understand how sports contribute to social issues such as identity, community, ethnicity, gender, and politics. May count either CMJN 3650 or COMM 3650.

CMJN 4000 MASS MEDIA LAW AND REGULATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. and junior or senior standing. Laws and regulations that govern journalists, media content and industries.

CMJN 4400 GENDER COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Examination of the ways in which gender is created, maintained, and/or changed through communication.

CMJN 4410 ADVANCED SPORTS VIDEO PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 2, LST. 1. Pr. CMJN 3410. This course is designed to give students in-depth training that covers advanced video editing techniques and effects. In addition, students will gain experience with advanced camera operation and techniques, focusing on high-quality production throughout the process.

CMJN 4430/4433 SPORTS, MEDIA AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Cultural and professional implications of the relationship between sports and media. May count either CMJN 4430 or JRNL 4430.

CMJN 4970/4973 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM (3) LEC. 3. Specialized topics related to the study and practice of Communication, Journalism, Media Studies and/or Public Relations.

CMJN 5100 CMJN ABROAD (3) AAB. 3. Explores theory, research, and practice in the fields of communication, media, and public relations in an international context. May count either CMJN 5100 or CMJN 6100.

CMJN 6100 CMJN ABROAD (3) AAB. 3. Explores theory, research, and practice in the fields of communication, media, and public relations in an international context. May count either CMJN 5100 or CMJN 6100.

Communication Courses

COMM 1000/1003 PUBLIC SPEAKING (3) LEC. 3. Oral communication theory and practice in a public speaking setting, with emphasis on content, organization, delivery, and adaptation to the audience.

COMM 1007 HONORS PUBLIC SPEAKING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. This course will focus on numerous elements of oral communication - public speaking, group communication and interpersonal communication. This is different from a typical speech class that focuses solely on public speaking. An emphasis will also be placed on debate(forensics).

COMM 2010 COMMUNICATION IN SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Theory underlying the construction of rhetorical messages as well as critical perspectives for the analysis of public discourse.

COMM 2400/2403 COMMUNICATION IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Communication in modern organizations, emphasizing practice in areas such as interviewing, managing meeting, and conducting professional presentations. May count either COMM 2400 or COMM 2403.

COMM 2410/2413 SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Theory and practice of competent communication in task-oriented small group settings such as committees. Topics include roles, leadership, decision making, problem solving, and conflict management.

COMM 3100/3103 ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. COMM 1000 or COMM 1003. Refining the knowledge and skills necessary for communicating clearly and effectively in oral presentations.

COMM 3110/3113 PERSUASION (3) LEC. 3. Understanding and analyzing persuasive messages. Survey of theoretical approaches to attitude formation and change. Developing skills as a critical evaluator of persuasive messages.

COMM 3300/3303 COMMUNICATION AND CONFLICT (3) LEC. 3. Enhance awareness of and develop skills in managing conflict processes in interpersonal relationships.

COMM 3450/3453 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Different types of problems encountered when communicating with different cultures.

COMM 3500/3503 FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. Theories examining the nature of human communication.

COMM 3510/3513 RESEARCH IN HUMAN COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. Introduction to and application of quantitative and quantitative methods of communication research.

COMM 3600/3603 FOUNDATIONS OF RHETORIC AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. Rhetorical theory from its classical roots to contemporary thinkers. Relates rhetorical theory and analysis to understanding persuasive discourse in our society.

COMM 3610/3613 RESEARCH IN RHETORIC AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Exploration of how to perform a critical analysis of various rhetorical artifacts.

COMM 3700/3703 ARGUMENTATION (3) LEC. 3. Examination of the critical tools necessary to evaluate arguments in current public discourse.

COMM 3803/3800 FAMILY COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. This course exam lines communication theory and research as applied to the family context (broadly defined). May count either COMM 3800 or COMM 3803.

COMM 3970/3973 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION (3-6) LEC. Topics that range beyond what is covered in other courses within the COMM curriculum. Specific subject matter is left up to the individual instructor. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

COMM 4100/4103 COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, MDIV or Departmental approval. Examination of persuasive strategies used in social movements to attract members, solidify support, and effect social change.

COMM 4410 THEORIES OF LEADERSHIP (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, or MDIV or Departmental approval. Examination of theory and research in leadership as a communication variable and behavioral practice in small group and organizational settings.

COMM 4470 HEALTH COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, or MDIV or Departmental approval. History, functions, and concepts central to the practice of health communication.

COMM 4500 MESSAGE STRUCTURES AND INFORMATION PROCESSING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, or MDIV or Departmental approval. Relationship between message structures and information processing in both cognitive and affective domains during speaking and listening.

COMM 4700 LEGAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, or MDIV or Departmental approval. Examination of the trial process, including jury selection, opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, and closing arguments.

COMM 4800 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, or MDIV or Departmental approval. Relationship between communication and the formation of self identity and maintenance of relationships

COMM 4810 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, MDIV or Departmental approval. Theory of non-language based communication and the impact of these messages on the overall communication process.

COMM 4850 DISCOURSE IN SOCIAL LIFE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, MDIV or Departmental approval. Language and social interaction as they reflect and shape identity of self, relationships, and group members.

COMM 4920 INTERNSHIP (3-6) AAB/INT. SU. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, or MDIV, or Departmental approval. Opportunity to apply classroom experience to career setting. Internship must be a supervised, closely monitored work experience, appropriate to the major, that that takes place. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

COMM 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION (3) IND. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, MDIV, or Departmental approval. Independent study on a specific topic of interest not already addressed in any regular COMM course.

COMM 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103 or COMM 3500 or COMM 3600 and COMM 3510 or COMM 3610. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

COMM 4970/4973 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and COMM 3500 and COMM 3600 and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3610). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, MDIV or Departmental approval. Topics in communication. Course may be repeated with a change in topic. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

COMM 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103 or COMM 3500 or COMM 3503 and COMM 3510 or COMM 3513 or COMM 3610 or COMM 3613. and COMM 3600 or COMM 3603. Departmental approval.. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

COMM 5600 POLITICAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and (COMM 3600 or COMM 3603) and (COMM 3500 or COMM 3503) and (COMM 3510 or COMM 3513) and (COMM 3610 or COMM 3613). and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, or MDIA or Departmental approval. This course will examine the communication strategies involved in the varied contexts of politics. Students will be exposed to relevant theories and ideas and asked to apply this knowledge to current political activity. May count either COMM 4600 or COMM 5600.

COMM 6300 SEX, GENDER, AND SPORT (3) LEC. 3. Focuses on sport, as a gendered institution. The course examines intersections of gender with age, sexual orientation, social class, gender identity, race and ethnicity and politics.

COMM 6600 POLITICAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. This course will examine the communication strategies involved in the varied contexts of politics. Students will be exposed to relevant theories and ideas and asked to apply this knowledge to current political activity.

COMM 7000 COMMUNICATION THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Critical examination of contemporary theories in communication.

COMM 7010 HISTORICAL, DESCRIPTIVE, AND CRITICAL APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION RESEARCH (3) LEC. 3. Consideration of the scope and nature of these types of research and their contribution to understanding human communication.

COMM 7020 EMPIRICAL APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION RESEARCH (3) LEC. 3. Quantitative research in communication; emphasis on understanding and doing empirical research.

COMM 7230 RHETORICAL CRITICISM (3) LEC. 3. Advanced methods in rhetorical criticism, including tools for the analysis of persuasive messages.

COMM 7300 APPROACHES TO STUDYING LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL INTERACTION (3) LEC. 3. Major approaches to studying language and social interaction that collectively make up discourse analysis.

COMM 7410 DEVELOPMENT OF RHETORICAL THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Historical survey of rhetorical theory from ancient to contemporary era; special attention to the role of rhetoric in shaping attitudes towards persuasion.

COMM 7420 SEMINAR IN PERSUASION AND ATTITUDE CHANGE (3) LEC. 3. Critical examination of current theory and research in the persuasive act and its effects.

COMM 7430 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS (3) LEC. 3. Investigation of key issues and debates that have emerged in post-World War II America.

COMM 7440 SEMINAR IN ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE (3) SEM. 3. Analysis of the fundamental theories of argumentation.

COMM 7450 SEMINAR IN INTRAPERSONAL PROCESSES IN COMMUNICATION (3) SEM. 3. Theories of cognitive and affective processing of information during speaking and listening.

COMM 7460 SEMINAR IN INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (3) SEM. 3. Theories of the structure and function of interpersonal (dyadic) communication focusing on conversational behavior, traits, relationships, and persuasion.

COMM 7470 SEMINAR IN SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION (3) SEM. 3. Advanced study of the principles of communication as they apply to the small group setting.

COMM 7480 SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (3) SEM. 3. In-depth approach to the study of communication processes within the setting of modern organizations.

COMM 7490 HEALTH COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Examination and application of social science research approaches to the study of health communication.

COMM 7500 GENDER COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Exploration of current theories and research on the relationship between communication and gender.

COMM 7600 MASS COMMUNICATION THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Exploration of major areas of concern to the theoretical study of mass communication and the social impact of mediated messages.

COMM 7610 STUDIES IN POPULAR CULTURE AND MASS COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Critical approaches to identifying, interpreting and experiencing popular culture texts within historical, cultural and communication contexts.

COMM 7620 BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AND CRITICISM (3) LEC. 3. Exploration of critical, theoretical, and organizational issues relevant to programming and the production of culture within mass media environments.

COMM 7630 MEDIA MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. In-depth analysis of current management issues specific to media managers in a multi-cultural world.

COMM 7640 SEMINAR IN FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM (3) SEM. 3. Exploration of classical and contemporary film theories and criticism.

COMM 7650 THE MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS (3) LEC. 3. Examination of the role of the mass communication system in the American political system.

COMM 7660 CULTURAL STUDIES IN MASS MEDIA (3) LEC. 3. Examination of communication research approaches to the study of culture and media.

COMM 7670 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN FIRST AMENDMENT LAW (3) LEC. 3. Exploration of controversial issues and cases in First Amendment Law that have been recently decided, are currently before courts, and have shaped the constitutional landscape in the United States.

COMM 7680 SPORTS, MEDIA, AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Cultural implications of the relationship between sports and media.

COMM 7810 PUBLIC RELATIONS THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Current areas of concern in the theoretical study of public relations.

COMM 7820 PUBLIC RELATIONS CAMPAIGNS (3) LEC. 3. Application of public relations and communication concepts to campaign challenges.

COMM 7830 PUBLIC RELATIONS CASE STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Examination of research on public relations case studies to provide a theoretical basis for analyzing similar situations in on the job.

COMM 7840 COMMUNICATION TRAINING AND CONSULTING (3) LEC. 3. Theory, concepts, and skills needed to be an effective communication trainer or consultant.

COMM 7930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Conferences, readings, research, and reports in general communication, mass communication, or public relations. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

COMM 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION (3) SEM. 3. Advanced treatment of contemporary topics, trends, current research findings, and opportunities. Course may be repeated for credit with change in topic.

COMM 7980 NON-THESIS PROJECT IN COMMUNICATION (3-6) LEC. SU. Pr. COMM 7000 and COMM 7010 and COMM 7020. and Minimum 27 graduate hours. Professional experience in communication area of interest. Must include managerial experience. Only 3 hours will apply to the degree.

COMM 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-6) MST. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Community Planning Courses

CPLN 5000 HISTORY AND THEORY OF URBAN FORM (3) LEC. 3. The vocabulary and historical development of urban design, focusing on the environmental and cultural forces that design, shape, build, and redevelop the urban fabric.

CPLN 5010 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Examines the basic principles of community design and planning, and introduces areas of specialization with the professional of planning.

CPLN 5020 CITIES, PLANNING, AND CLIMATE CHANGE (3) SEM. 3. This course teaches about connections that climate has with urban processes; how cities are affected by climate change, impact of local land use and transportation decisions, and Climate Action Planning at local level including GHG inventory, adaptation and mitigation strategies.

CPLN 5040 LAND USE PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Students will develop the critical and analytical skills, as well as analyze relevant literature, that will arm them with the necessary tools in order to implement, administer, and analyze a wide range of plans.

CPLN 5050 LAND AND URBAN ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Examines the historical development and contemporary functioning of cities from an economic perspective, with focus on land use and transportation.

CPLN 5060 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. This topical seminar addresses issues related to transportation and mobility within the context of sustainable, healthy cities. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester.

CPLN 5070 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Addresses issues related to land use, environmental impact and policy, and sustainability. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5070 or CPLN 6070.

CPLN 5080 AFFORDABLE HOUSING PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. This topical seminar addresses planning issues related to housing and neighborhood conservation. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5080/6080.

CPLN 5090 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Planning issues related to community and economic development content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5090 or CPLN 6090.

CPLN 5100 URBAN DESIGN METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Techniques and methodologies in urban design problem- solving and strategies for implementation.

CPLN 5110 SUSTAINABLE URBANISM AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT (3) SEM. 3. This course covers growth management in the United States. It covers growth management programs, the causes of sprawl, the costs and benefits of sprawl and growth management, and solutions to managing growth.

CPLN 5120 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (3) SEM. 3. This course covers federal, state, and local environmental policy-making and governance. It discusses how planners, policy-makers, and government officials implement existing environmental policies, how environmental policies are created, theories of environmental policy, and the new and emerging methods of environmental policy.

CPLN 5400 PRESERVATION PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Planning for the preservation, restoration, conservation, adaptive reuse of historic buildings, sites and districts within the comprehensive planning process.

CPLN 5450 PLANNING HISTORY AND THEORY (3) LEC. 3. This course provides future practitioners with the theoretical and historical tools and knowledge to effective in the planning field. May count either CPLN 5450 or CPLN 6450.

CPLN 5460 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. Basic concepts of geographic information systems and digital planning applications. Emphasis on spatial decision-making and visualization of planning scenarios. May count with CPLN 5460 or CPLN 6460.

CPLN 5970 SPECIAL TOPICS: CURRENT ISSUES IN PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Elective seminar addresses current issues in planning. May count either CPLN 5970 or CPLN 6970.

CPLN 6000 HISTORY AND THEORY OF URBAN FORM (3) LEC. 3. The vocabulary and historical development of urban design, focusing on the environmental and cultural forces that design, shape, build, and redevelop the urban fabric.

CPLN 6010 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Examines the basic principles of community design and planning, and introduces areas of specialization with the professional of planning.

CPLN 6020 CITIES, PLANNING, AND CLIMATE CHANGE (3) SEM. 3. This course focuses on connections that climate has with urban processes, climate action planning at local level, compiling greenhouse gas inventory, climate adaptation and mitigation strategies, and building sustainable and resilient cities.

CPLN 6040 LAND USE PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Students will develop the critical and analytical skills, as well as analyze relevant literature, that will arm them with the necessary tools in order to implement, administer, and analyze a wide range of plans.

CPLN 6050 LAND AND URBAN ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Examines the historical development and contemporary functioning of cities from an economic perspective, with focus on land use and transportation.

CPLN 6060 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. Addresses issues related to transportation and mobility within the context of sustainable, healthy cities. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5060 or CPLN 6060.

CPLN 6070 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Addresses issues related to land use, environmental impact and policy, and sustainability. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5070 or CPLN 6070.

CPLN 6080 AFFORDABLE HOUSING PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Addresses planning issues related to housing and neighborhood conservation. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5080 or CPLN 6080.

CPLN 6090 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Planning issues related to community and economic development. Content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5090 or CPLN 6090.

CPLN 6100 URBAN DESIGN METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Techniques and methodologies in urban design problem- solving and strategies for implementation.

CPLN 6400 PRESERVATION PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Planning for the preservation, restoration, conservation and adaptive reuse of historic buildings, sites and districts within the comprehensive planning process.

CPLN 6450 PLANNING HISTORY AND THEORY (3) LEC. 3. This course provides future practitioners with the theoretical and historical tools and knowledge to effective in the planning field. May count either CPLN 5450 or CPLN 6450.

CPLN 6460 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. Basic concepts of geographic information systems and digital planning applications. Emphasis on spatial decision-making and visualization of planning scenarios. May count with CPLN 5460 or CPLN 6460.

CPLN 6970 SPECIAL TOPICS: CURRENT ISSUES IN PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Elective seminar addresses current issues in planning. May count either CPLN 5970 or CPLN 6970.

CPLN 7200 URBAN DESIGN STUDIO (3) STU. 3. Basic principles of urban design are explored, with an emphasis on the planner's role in shaping the built environment. Exercises and projects provide hands-on experience in making good urban places.

CPLN 7240 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Development of working knowledge of planning techniques such as data collection, basic statistics, demographic analysis, economic analysis, social research, transportation, and evaluation.

CPLN 7430 LAND USE LAW (3) LEC. 3. This course covers three key elements of the planning profession: ethics, law and plan implementation.

CPLN 7600 SYNTHESIS STUDIO I (3) STU. 3. Pr. CPLN 7400. Serves as the primary opportunity for the student to demonstrate their competency in community design and planning by translating knowledge into action through the development of a practical plan.

CPLN 7610 SYNTHESIS STUDIO 2 (3) STU. 3. This class is the second required plan-making studio in the Master of Community Planning Program. Synthesis Studio 2 is the second in a two-semester series of classes that will critically consider a real-world planning project involving a city. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CPLN 7800 SYNTHESIS PROJECT (6) AAB/STU. 12. Departmental approval. Demonstration of competence in community planning and design through production of an original, comprehensive project that integrates knowledge and experience in addressing a complex planning and design problem.

CPLN 7920 PLANNING INTERNSHIP (1-6) AAB/INT. Departmental approval. Professional experience in public, private or non-profit planning or planning-related agency.

Community and Civic Engagement Courses

CCEN 2000 INTRODUCTION: COMMUNITY AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to Community and Civic Engagement introduces students to the context, issues, skills, and experience of citizenship and civic leadership in a democratic society.

CCEN 2100 WOMEN AND LEADERSHIP (3) LEC. 3. An interactive exploration of the social, political, economic, and cultural implications of women's current and historic leadership roles.

CCEN 3000 CAPSTONE IN COMMUNITY AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT (1) PRA. 1. SU. Completion of 15 credits toward Minor in Community and Civic Engagement. This course is required for minors in CEE. The capstone requires students to draw upon the knowledge obtained throughout their coursework and to perform relevant service projects.

CCEN 3200 LEADERSHIP FOR A GLOBAL SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. This heavily discussion- and project-based seminar, coupled with reading list and plethora of guests, activities, and online resources, offers participants the tools required or effective leadership in an increasingly global society.

CCEN 5100 ENGAGE, INTERACT, LEAD (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CCEN 2000. An interactive exploration of classic texts of leadership, civic engagement and daily reading resources available through social media.

CCEN 6100 ENGAGE, INTERACT, LEAD (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CCEN 2000. An interactive exploration of classic texts of leadership, civic engagement and daily reading resources available through social media.

CCEN 7900 COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP PRACTICUM (3) LEC. 3. This course provides graduates in CCL an opportunity to integrate course content, personal commitments, and real world experience. Completion of 9 credits toward Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Community Leadership.

Economics Courses

ECON 2020/2023 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Economic principles emphasizing scarcity and choice, consumer behavior, supply and demand, markets, production and cost, globalization of markets, role of government, and market and government failure.

ECON 2027 HONORS PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Economic principles emphasizing scarcity and choice, consumer behavior, supply and demand, markets, production and cost, globalization of markets, role of government, and market and government failure.

ECON 2030/2033 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Economic principles emphasizing economic aggregates, including measuring economic performance, macroeconomic theory, inflation and unemployment, money and banking, and fiscal and monetary policy. May count either ECON 2030 or ECON 2033.

ECON 2037 HONORS PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Economic principles emphasizing economic aggregates, including measuring economic performance, macroeconomic theory, inflation and unemployment, money and banking, and fiscal and monetary policy.

ECON 3020 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Theory of pricing under varying market conditions and distribution of income among the factors of production.

ECON 3030 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037. A study of national economic aggregates and the market determination of output, employment, and inflation. Introduction to economic monetary and fiscal policy on the economy.

ECON 3040 CONSUMER ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027) or (ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037). A broad study of consumer economics at both the household level and the national consumption aggregates.

ECON 3100 LAW AND ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Description of the many substantive areas in which law has an economics foundation and an analysis of how law affects economic relations.

ECON 3200 MONEY AND BANKING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037. Theoretical and institutional analyses of monetary systems, foreign exchange, and commercial banking.

ECON 3300 ECONOMICS OF SPORTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Economic analysis of professional and collegiate sports, including the structure of competition and performance in individual and team sports.

ECON 3500 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037. Analysis of alternative government approaches to solving basic economic problems.

ECON 3600 MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMISTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 and (MATH 1690 or MATH 2630 or MATH 2637). Fundamental mathematical and quantitative methods employed by economists. Application of calculus, probability, statistics, and linear algebra to economics.

ECON 3700 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2037. Development of economic ideas, principles and systems of analysis from early times to the present.

ECON 3800 PUBLIC CHOICE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037. Economic analysis of public sector decision making. Emphasis on actions taken by voters, bureaucrats, and lobbyists elected to influence public sector outcomes.

ECON 4000 ECONOMICS OF WORK AND PAY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Theoretical and institutional examination of the labor market, including wage theories, unionism, occupational choice, and public policy.

ECON 4100 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Relationship of market structure to the pricing behavior and economic performance of firms. Topics include regulation, research and development, and technical change.

ECON 4200 GOVERNMENT, BUSINESS AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037 or ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Economic role of government in a free enterprise economy. Application of microeconomic theory to policy issues, particularly antitrust and regulation.

ECON 4300 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037. Economic consequences of free trade, including identification and measurement of gains and losses. Analysis of trade restrictions, such as quotes, tariffs, VERs. Examination of labor and capital movements between nations.

ECON 4400 ECONOMICS OF INNOVATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027) or (ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037). Study of how innovation and technological change impacts the individual firm and the national and global economies.

ECON 4600 ECONOMETRICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3600 and (STAT 2010 or STAT 2017 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2513 or STAT 2610 or STAT 2600). Basic statistical toolbox to analyze economic data and evaluate economic models. Topics include simple and multivariate linear regressions, maximum likelihood estimation, serial correlation and heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, qualitative response models, and basic time series.

ECON 4920 INTERNSHIP (1-3) AAB/INT. SU. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 and ECON 2037 or departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ECON 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. ECON 3020 or Departmental approval. Directed readings on a topic of special interest. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ECON 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3) AAB/IND. SU. Pr., Departmental approval. Investigation and research into economic problems of special interest to the student and instructor. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ECON 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. ECON 3020 or Departmental approval. Directed honors thesis research. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

ECON 5020 ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 and (MATH 1610 or MATH 1613 or MATH 1617) or Departmental approval. Mathematical analysis of market-based pricing and production. Includes the economics of information and uncertainty, and strategic behavior.

ECON 5030 MACROECONOMIC THEORY AND POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037 or Departmental approval. Analysis of the national economy and impact of government policies on aggregate economic variables.

ECON 5100 ECONOMICS OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037. Cause and effects of economic growth and development, for example, ways of measuring growth, role of government policy, effects of growth and trade, and effects of investment.

ECON 5200 URBAN AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037) and ECON 3020. Nature and causes of state and local economic development, including plant location, residential location, interregional trade and factor flows, and public policy.

ECON 5400 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037 or Departmental approval. Survey of the economic advancement of the United States from European origins to the present.

ECON 5600 BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC FORECASTING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037) and (STAT 2610 or STAT 2010 or STAT 2017) or Departmental approval. Interpretation of macroeconomic forecasting methods and development of competency in forecasting at the firm level.

ECON 5700 HEALTH ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Analysis of the economics of health care, including demand for and supply of health care and health care policy.

ECON 5800 GOVERNMENT SPENDING AND TAXATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. The economic rationale for government expenditures, economic consequences of public spending, and methods of taxation and funding of government programs.

ECON 6020 ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 and (MATH 1610 or MATH 1613 or MATH 1617). Mathematical analysis of market-based pricing and production. Includes the economics of information and uncertainty and strategic behavior.

ECON 6030 MACROECONOMIC THEORY AND POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037 or Departmental approval. Analysis of the national economy and impact of government policies on aggregate economic variables.

ECON 6100 ECONOMICS OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Causes and effects of economic growth and development, for example ways of measuring growth, role of government policy, effects of growth and trade, and effects of investment.

ECON 6200 URBAN AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037) and ECON 3020. Nature and causes of state and local economic development, including plant location, residential location, interregional trade and factor flows, and public policy.

ECON 6400 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037. or Departmental approval.Survey of the economic advancement of the United States from European origins to the present.

ECON 6600 BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC FORECASTING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2030 or ECON 2033 or ECON 2037) and (STAT 2610 or STAT 2010 or STAT 2017) or Departmental approval. Interpretation of macroeconomic forecasting methods and development of competency in forecasting at the firm level

ECON 6700/6706 HEALTH ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 or Departmental approval. Analysis of the economics of health care, including demand for and supply of health care and health care policy.

ECON 6800 GOVERNMENT SPENDING AND TAXATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 or Departmental approval. Economic rationale for government expenditures, economic consequences of public spending, and methods of taxation and funding of government programs.

ECON 7000 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Consent of MBA program director. Microeconomic theories of the firm and of markets, with emphasis on their applications to current business issues.

ECON 7110 MICROECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 or Departmental approval. Consumer behavior and market models of competition and monopoly. Traditional and contemporary theories of consumer and household behavior under constraint; models of competitive behavior.

ECON 7120 MICROECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7110 or Departmental approval. Analysis of producer behavior, including production theory, cost theory, profit maximization, theories of various market structures, and derived demand for inputs.

ECON 7130 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 and ECON 6030 or Departmental approval. Fundamental mathematical methods in economics and econometrics, including linear and matrix algebra, calculus, comparative statistics, optimization, concavity, constrained optimization dynamics difference equations, and differential equations.

ECON 7210 MACROECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 6030 or Departmental approval. Evaluation of fundamental theoretical and policy-oriented issues in macroeconomics, emphasizing post-Keynesian developments.

ECON 7220 MACROECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 6030 or Departmental approval. Foundations of macroeconomics, neoclassical production and growth theory, overlapping generations models, optimal saving, open economy macroeconomics, applied time series macrodynamics.

ECON 7310 ECONOMETRICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Advanced treatment of the standard linear model of least square theory, including assumptions and properties of the SLM and the statistical testing of behavioral hypotheses.

ECON 7320 ECONOMETRICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7310. Econometric techniques employed in advanced empirical research. Topics include estimation and inference in simultaneous equation systems, limited dependent variables, non-nested testing, time-series analysis.

ECON 7330 MICROECONOMETRICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7310. Econometric techniques for applied microeconomics. Limited dependent variable models, survival and count data analysis, and selection bias.

ECON 7340 MACROECONOMETRICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7310. Analysis of economic time series and identification and estimation of parameters in multi-equation models.

ECON 7410 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3700 or Departmental approval. Analysis and study of classical contributions to economics, from early times to Karl Marx.

ECON 7420 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3700 or Departmental approval. Neoclassical economics, including the theories of Mill, Jevons, early Austrians, early French contributors, Veblenian institutional economics, and Alfred Marshall.

ECON 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-6) MST. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

ECON 8110 ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7120 or Departmental approval. Advanced analysis, integrating the economics of time and uncertainty into mainline price theory.

ECON 8120 ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7120. or Departmental approval. Advanced analysis, integrating imperfect information and strategic behavior into economic models of trade and investment.

ECON 8210 TOPICS IN MACROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7220 or Departmental approval. Goals, procedures and achievements in attaining monetary objectives domestically and abroad. Emphasis on macro-money models and effects of monetary policy on economic activity.

ECON 8420 ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS AND CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. How contemporary economic theory helps explain the emergence, hey-day, and decline of economic institutions, including social and regulatory institutions.

ECON 8510 ECONOMICS OF TAXATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7120 or Departmental approval. Examines tax structures in the United States, evaluates tax reform proposals, and studies the effects of taxation on resource allocation and economic welfare.

ECON 8520 PUBLIC CHOICE (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Advanced analysis of governmental expenditures and other not-for-profit sectors of the economy.

ECON 8530 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE LAW (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 or Departmental approval. Advanced analysis of the substantive areas in which law has an economic foundation and ways law affects economic relations.

ECON 8540 SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 3020 or Departmental approval. Advanced analysis of pricing and allocation of renewable and non-renewable resources.

ECON 8550 EXTERNALITIES AND PUBLIC GOODS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7120 or Departmental approval. Advanced analysis of pricing and allocation of economic goods when property rights are not well defined.

ECON 8610 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7120. or Departmental approval.. Determinants of market structure, effects of market structure on industry performance, theory of the firm, research and development, advertising, and vertical integration.

ECON 8620 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7120 or Departmental approval. Case studies in the history and current practice of regulation in the United States at all levels.

ECON 8710 INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Trade theory, including classical, neoclassical, factor proportions, and industrial organization. Applied trade theory and empirical applications.

ECON 8720 INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval.Theoretical and applied time series analysis at open economy macroeconomic models, international monetary and financial theory, balance of payments theory, and exchange rates.

ECON 8810 LABOR MARKET ANALYSIS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7110 or Departmental approval. Analysis of labor markets, and determination of wages and other terms of employment. Emphasis on academic studies of labor market issues.

ECON 8820 TOPICS IN LABOR ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 7110 or Departmental approval. Selected topics, including education and on-the-job training. Labor mobility and immigration, employment discrimination, and the impact of labor unions.

ECON 8970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3) IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Advanced topics related to economics. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

ECON 8980 ECONOMICS WORKSHOP (1) LEC. 1. Pr., Departmental approval. Individual research projects, presentations, and discussions of the economics profession.

ECON 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

English Courses

ENGL 1100/1103 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I (3) LEC. 3. English Composition Core. Intensive study of and practice in effective expository and argumentative writing. May not be taken concurrently with ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127.

ENGL 1107 HONORS WRITING SEMINAR I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. English Composition Core. Topics in writing for students in the Honors College.

ENGL 1120/1123 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1103 or ENGL 1107. English Composition Core. Emphasis on research.

ENGL 1127 HONORS WRITING SEMINAR II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1107. English Composition Core. Emphasis on research.

ENGL 2000 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Introduction to the genres of creative writing.

ENGL 2010 INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Introduction to the disciplines of professional writing.

ENGL 2200/2203 WORLD LITERATURE BEFORE 1600 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Culturally diverse readings in world literature from the ancient period to c. 1600.

ENGL 2207 HONORS WORLD LITERATURE BEFORE 1600 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Culturally diverse readings in world literature from the ancient period to c. 1600.

ENGL 2210/2213 WORLD LITERATURE AFTER 1600 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Culturally diverse readings in world literature from c. 1600 to the present.

ENGL 2217 HONORS WORLD LITERATURE AFTER 1600 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Culturally diverse readings in world literature from c. 1600 to the present.

ENGL 2230/2233 BRITISH LITERATURE BEFORE 1789 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Survey of British literature from its beginnings to the end of the 18th century.

ENGL 2240/2243 BRITISH LITERATURE AFTER 1789 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Survey of British literature from the end of the 18th century to the present.

ENGL 2250/2253 AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1865 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1865.

ENGL 2260/2263 AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER 1865 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Survey of American literature from 1865 to the present.

ENGL 3040 TECHNICAL WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Writing in engineering, scientific, and technical fields. Credit will not be given for both ENGL 3040 and ENGL 3080.

ENGL 3080 BUSINESS WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Writing in business, management, or governmental service fields. Credit will not be given for ENGL 3080 and ENGL 3040.

ENGL 3110 SURVEY OF LINGUISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Structure of language, especially American English sounds, words, and syntax, along with study in such areas as dialects and language change.

ENGL 3120 SURVEY OF RHETORIC (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Survey of rhetoric from Ancient Greece to the present.

ENGL 3130 SURVEY OF CRITICAL THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Introduction to critical methods and theoretical approaches to the study of literature.

ENGL 3360 THE BIBLE FOR STUDENTS OF LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260. Biblical backgrounds to English and American literature; the Bible as literature.

ENGL 3700 TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING (3) SEM. 3. Pr. (ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1123 or ENGL 1127) and ENGL 2000. A concentrated investigation of varying topics in Creative Writing.

ENGL 3710 SURVEY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1900 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. African American literature from its beginnings to 1900.

ENGL 3720 SURVEY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER 1900 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. African American literature from 1900 to the present.

ENGL 3850 STUDY IN LONDON (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Study Abroad in London providing an introduction to London's and England's literature and culture.

ENGL 3870 WORLD ENGLISH LITERATURES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Non-British and non-American literature written in English.

ENGL 3890 WRITING CENTER THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) SEM. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260. Introduction to writing center theory, pedagogy, and history.

ENGL 4000 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Theory and practice of expository and argumentative writing.

ENGL 4010 TOPICS IN WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. An in-depth study of a specific topic of writing. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4020 TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL EDITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2010 or Departmental approval. Introduction to technical and professional editing.

ENGL 4030 DOCUMENT DESIGN IN TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION (3) LAB. 3. Pr. ENGL 2010 or Departmental approval. Document design in technical and professional communication.

ENGL 4040 PUBLIC WRITING (3) LAB. 3. Pr. ENGL 2010 or Departmental approval. Writing in the public sphere.

ENGL 4140 LANGUAGE VARIATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Social, regional, and contextual forces that contribute to dialect diversity.

ENGL 4150 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE STUDY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Concentrated investigation of varying topics in linguistics or rhetoric. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4160 TECHNOLOGY, LITERACY, AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217 or Departmental approval. Connections between technology, literacy, and culture, including instruction in advanced computer applications.

ENGL 4180 RHETORICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Advanced study of topics in rhetorical theory and practice.

ENGL 4200 FICTION WRITING I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000. Introduction to the craft of fiction writing; reading, studying, and writing short stories.

ENGL 4210 FICTION WRITING II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 4200. Advanced fiction writing.

ENGL 4220 POETRY WRITING I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000. Introduction to the craft of poetry writing; reading, studying, and writing poetry.

ENGL 4230 POETRY WRITING II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 4220. Advanced poetry writing.

ENGL 4240 SPECIAL PROJECT IN CREATIVE WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 4210 or ENGL 4230. Capstone course in creative writing. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4300 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. British and continental medieval literature.

ENGL 4310 RENAISSANCE ENGLISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. English literature 1485-1660. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4320 RESTORATION AND 18TH-CENTURY LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. British literature, 1660-1800. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4330 AGE OF REVOLUTION IN BRITISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. British literature, 1770-1830.

ENGL 4340 19TH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. British literature, 1830-1910. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4350 20TH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. British literature, 1910-1980. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4360 CONTEMPORARY BRITISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. British literature since 1980. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4370 IRISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Periods, movements, or major figures of the literature of Ireland.

ENGL 4400 EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. American literature from its beginnings to 1800.

ENGL 4410 19TH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. American literature 1800-1910. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4420 20TH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. American literature 1910-1980. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4430 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. American literature since 1980. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4440 SOUTHERN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Literature of the American South.

ENGL 4450 TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Concentrated investigation of varying topics in African American literature and culture.

ENGL 4500 STUDIES IN POETRY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study in one or more kinds of poetry.

ENGL 4510 18TH-CENTURY NOVEL (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study of novels produced in the 18th century.

ENGL 4520 19TH-CENTURY NOVEL (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study of novels produced in the 19th century.

ENGL 4530 20TH-CENTURY FICTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study of fiction produced in the 20th century.

ENGL 4540 STUDIES IN DRAMA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study of one or more periods or kinds of drama.

ENGL 4550 STUDIES IN FILM AND LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Examining the interconnections between film and literature.

ENGL 4560 STUDIES IN CRITICAL THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Advanced study in one or more theoretical approaches to literature.

ENGL 4570 STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Non-British and non-American literature written in English or studied in translation.

ENGL 4600 CHAUCER (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Major works of Chaucer in Middle English.

ENGL 4610 SHAKESPEARE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Shakespeare's works, career, and culture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4620 MILTON (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Milton's principal poems, especially Paradise Lost, with some attention to his prose.

ENGL 4630 BRITISH AUTHOR(S) (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study of one or more British authors. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4640 AMERICAN AUTHOR(S) (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study of one or more American authors. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4700 TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Concentrated investigation of varying topics in literature. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4710 TOPICS IN GENDER AND LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Examination of varying topics related to the intersection between literature and gender. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4720 TOPICS IN MINORITY VOICES IN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Literature of one or more minority groups. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4730 TOPICS IN POPULAR CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. One or more topics in popular culture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4740 ENVIRONMENT, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Topics related to the intersections between the environment, literature, and culture.

ENGL 4750 TOPICS IN MYTHOLOGY AND FOLKLORE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Study of one or more topics in mythology or folklore. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4800 SEMINAR IN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 3130. Research seminar in literature. Senior standing.

ENGL 4810 CAPSTONE IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2010. Advanced course in developing complex professional writing projects.

ENGL 4920 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH STUDIES (3) AAB/IND. 3. SU. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Departmental approval. Supervised experience in applying reading, writing, and research skills to the workplace.

ENGL 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ENGLISH (3) IND. 3. Pr. 3.00 GPA. At least 5 courses in ENGL 4000-4999. Junior standing and Departmental approval. Individual reading programs determined by the instructor and student. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ENGLISH (3) IND. 3. Pr. Honors College. . At least 5 courses in ENGL 4000-4999. Junior standing and Departmental approval. Individual reading programs determined by the instructor and student.

ENGL 4997 HONORS THESIS (3) AAB/IND. 3. Pr. Honors College. ENGL 4967. and Departmental approval. Honors thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 5410 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Chronological development of the English language.

ENGL 5840 APPROACHES TO ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2230 or ENGL 2240 or ENGL 2250 or ENGL 2260 or ENGL 2200 or ENGL 2203 or ENGL 2207 or ENGL 2210 or ENGL 2213 or ENGL 2217. Examination of several grammatical theories, with emphasis on English syntax.

ENGL 6410 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) LEC. 3. Chronological development of the English language.

ENGL 6840 APPROACHES TO ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3) LEC. 3. Examination of several grammatical theories, with emphasis on English syntax.

ENGL 7000 TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL EDITING (3) LEC. 3. Research-based best practices in technical and professional editing.

ENGL 7010 TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION: ISSUES AND APPROACHES (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to the history, practice, and profession of technical and professional communication.

ENGL 7020 PEDAGOGY IN WRITING STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Methods, practices, and theories of technical and professional communication for prospective teachers.

ENGL 7030 STUDIES IN TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Extensive study of selected types of research and writing for special purposes and novel situations. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7040 ENGLISH COMPOSITION: ISSUES AND APPROACHES (3) LEC. 3. Theory, research, and practice in English composition.

ENGL 7050 STUDIES IN COMPOSITION (3) LEC. 3. Advanced study of an approach or an issue in composition studies. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7060 WEB DEVELOPMENT (3) LEC. 3. Research-based best practices in web development.

ENGL 7070 GRANT AND PROPOSAL WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Research-based best practices in grant and proposal writing.

ENGL 7080 DOCUMENT DESIGN (3) LEC. 3. Research-based best practices in document design.

ENGL 7090 TOPICS IN WRITING STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Advanced study and practice in topics related to technical, scientific, business, and professional communication.

ENGL 7130 FICTION WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Workshop in the craft and writing of fiction. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7140 POETRY WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Workshop in the craft and writing of poetry. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7150 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Major works and genres in Middle English and related literary traditions. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7160 EARLY MODERN STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Major literary movements, authors, and/or genres. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7170 18TH-CENTURY STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Major literary movements, authors, and/or genres. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7180 19TH-CENTURY STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Major literary movements, authors, and/or genres. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7190 AMERICAN STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Major literary movements, authors, and/or genres. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7200 LITERARY MODERNISMS (3) LEC. 3. Major literary movements, authors, and/or genres. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7210 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Major literary movements, authors, and /or genres. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7280 STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Selected topic in English linguistics, including historical syntax, dialectology, phonology. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7300 RHETORIC THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Issues and developments in rhetorical theory and analysis, with special attention to the rhetoric of written texts. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7770 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Study of African American literature and literary theories of ethnicity and race. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7780 STUDIES IN RACE, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY (3) LEC. 3. Focused topics in literature and theory of ethnicity, sexuality, gender, race, class, or disability. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7790 LITERARY THEORY: ISSUES AND APPROACHES (3) LEC. 3. Overview of significant theoretical issues, approaches, and conversations in literary and cultural theory, historical and/or contemporary.

ENGL 7800 STUDIES IN LITERARY THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Close study of particular theoretical approaches to literary study, including cultural studies, postmodernism, textual criticism, anthropological approaches. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7810 STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Comparative study of authors, genres, or issues from two or more cultures or critical perspectives. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7830 MAJORS AUTHOR(S) (3) LEC. 3. One or more major authors or a single work by a major author. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7850 STUDIES IN GENRE (3) LEC. 3. Study of one or more genres across literary periods. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7870 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (3) LEC. 3. Special problems, topics, and materials in English studies not covered in other existing courses. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7910 PRACTICUM IN TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION (3) PRA. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Supervised client-based experience in tasks commonly performed by technical communicators analyzed through current research in technical communication.

ENGL 7920 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH STUDIES (3) INT. 3. SU. Departmental approval. Supervised professional experience in workplace or university outreach settings.

ENGL 7930 DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY (1-3) IND. Available on a limited basis for qualified students; requires advance permission of the department graduate committee. Credits are to be arranged. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7940 PRACTICUM IN TEACHING COLLEGE ENGLISH (1) LEC. 1. SU. An introduction to the teaching of English at Auburn University. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ENGL 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 20 credit hours.

ENGL 8990/8996 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 20 credit hours.

Foreign Languages Courses

FLNG 1000 ELEMENTARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. For languages not currently taught in the department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, but taken through approved distance learning or Study Abroad programs. Credit awarded in consultation with department chair. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLNG 1010 ELEMENTARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE (4) LEC. 4. Pr., Departmental approval. For languages not currently taught in the Department of Foreign Language and Literatures.

FLNG 1020/1023 ELEMENTARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE (4) LEC. 4. Pr. FLNG 1010 or Departmental approval. For languages not currently taught in the Department of Foreign Language and Literatures.

FLNG 2000 INTERMEDIATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE (1-10) AAB/LEC. Pr., Departmental approval. For languages not currently taught in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, but taken through approved distance learning or Study Abroad programs. Credit awarded in consultation with department chair. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLNG 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-6) IND. Pr. Honors College or Departmental approval. Directed readings and research culminating in a thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLAS Courses

FLAS 3450 TOPICS IN ASIAN CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Study of traditional and/or modern Asian culture with special emphasis on cross-cultural and transnational interactions with in Asia, as well as with the west. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Foreign Lng-Chinese Courses

FLCN 1000 ELEMENTARY CHINESE ABROAD (1-10) AAB/IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Elementary coursework on approved Study-Abroad program. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLCN 1010 ELEMENTARY CHINESE I (4) LEC. 4. Exposure to Chinese language and culture for students with little or no knowledge of Chinese.

FLCN 1020 ELEMENTARY CHINESE II (4) LEC. 4. Pr. FLCN 1010 or Departmental approval. Continued exposure to Chinese language and culture. Departmental approval. Fulfills College of Liberal Arts foreign language core requirement.

FLCN 2000 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE ABROAD (1-10) AAB/IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Variable credit, determined by the department. Intermediate course work in approved Study-Abroad program. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLCN 2010 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I (4) LEC. 4. Pr. FLCN 1020 or Departmental approval. Continued exposure to Chinese culture; introduction to intermediate language skills.

FLCN 2020 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE II (4) LEC. 4. Pr. FLCN 2010 or Departmental approval. Continued exposure to Chinese culture; intermediate language skills with emphasis on grammar.

FLCN 3000 ADVANCED CHINESE ABROAD (1-10) AAB/IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Variable credit, determined by department. Advanced course work in approved Study-Abroad program. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLCN 3010 CHINESE COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (3-6) AAB/LEC. Pr. FLCN 2010 or Departmental approval. Intense practice in spoken and written Chinese, both text-and situation-based. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLCN 3020 CHINESE COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLCN 3010. In this course, students will continue to develop integrated Chinese language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. There will be increased focus on reading and writing skills in Chinese and on learning grammar patterns needed to write in Chinese.

FLCN 3050 CHINESE CINEMA (3) LEC. 3. Major works of Chinese cinema from 1920s to present with emphasis on cultural and literary aspects.

FLCN 3200 LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM SEMINAR IN CHINESE (1) IND. 1. Pr. FLCN 1020 or Departmental approval. Language component with reading and in-class discussion to complement a lecture course in English and in a discipline other than Chinese. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FLCN 3450 TOPICS IN CHINESE LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3-6) AAB/LEC. Directed study of topics of interest. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLCN 3510 INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE CULTURE IN ENGLISH (3-6) LEC. Chinese culture as depicted in art, film, literature, history. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLCN 3930 DIRECTED STUDY IN CHINESE (1-6) IND. Pr. FLCN 2010. Directed study in area of special interest for the superior student in Chinese. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Foreign Lng-French Courses

FLFR 1000 ELEMENTARY FRENCH ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the elementary level in an approved Study Abroad program. Credit may substitute for required 1000-level courses in French. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLFR 1010 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Basic language skills with emphasis on conversation. Exposure to culture.

FLFR 1020 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LFRE score of 0241 or FLFR 1010. Basic language skills with emphasis on conversation. Exposure to culture. Fulfills College of Liberal Arts core foreign language requirement.

FLFR 1030 READING PROFICIENCY IN FRENCH (3) LEC. 3. SU. Pr., Departmental approval. Instruction to enable graduate students to read and understand scholarly materials in French related to their field of study. May not be used to satisfy undergraduate language requirements.

FLFR 2000 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the intermediate level, taken on an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the French undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLFR 2010 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LFRE score of 0325 or FLFR 1020. Language skills, grammar review, readings in French culture, literature, and history.

FLFR 2020 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LFRE score of 0372 or FLFR 2010. Systematic review of problems in French grammar for speakers of English. Prepares students for conversation, composition and civilization in the third-year sequence.

FLFR 3000 JUNIOR/ADVANCED FRENCH ABROAD (1-9) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the junior or advanced level taken on an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the French undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLFR 3010 FRENCH PHONETICS AND DICTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LFRE score of 0428 or FLFR 2020. Basic principles of French phonetics through sound recognition discrimination and intensive practice.

FLFR 3030 FRENCH CONVERSATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LFRE score of 0428 or FLFR 2020. Intensive practice in spoken French, based on texts and everyday situations, especially in contemporary French society. Includes review of vocabulary.

FLFR 3040 FRENCH COMPOSITION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LFRE score of 0428 or FLFR 2020. Review of grammar and practice in writing on topics ranging from descriptions and personal opinions to current affairs and social problems.

FLFR 3050 FRENCH CINEMA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LFRE score of 0428 or FLFR 2020. Sampling of important films from the beginnings of French cinema in 1895 to the present day, including the intellectual, historical, cultural, and literary matrix of each film.

FLFR 3100 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LFRE score of 0428 or FLFR 3040 or FLFR 3030 or Departmental approval. Grounding in basic analytical approaches, language, and organizational skills needed to discuss French literature effectively and coherently, orally or in writing.

FLFR 3110 FRENCH CIVILIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLFR 2020 or Departmental approval. Cultural heritage of France as reflected in present-day life patterns, traditions, and institutions.

FLFR 3140 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLFR 3030 or FLFR 3040 or Departmental approval. The Middle Ages to the 1800s, emphasizes coherent and effective writing in French.

FLFR 3150 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLFR 3030 or FLFR 3040 or Departmental approval. Readings in French literature prose, drama, and poetry from the 19th century to the present, centered on a theme or topic.

FLFR 3200 LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM SEMINAR IN FRENCH (1) LEC. 1. Pr. FLFR 2010 or Departmental approval. Language component with readings and in-class discussions to complement a lecture course in English and in a discipline other than French. Parallel enrollment is recommended. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLFR 3310/3313 BUSINESS FRENCH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Completed 3 courses from FLFR 3000-3999 or LFRE minimum score of 428. Intensive practice in preparing commercial correspondence and reading contracts, agreements, and related documents in French. Emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of a business vocabulary.

FLFR 3510 TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Topics drawing from French literature, history, fine arts, or culture of general interest to students with little or no previous study of French.

FLFR 3930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) AAB/IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Directed study in an area of special interest to the superior student in French. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLFR 4000 SENIOR/ADVANCED FRENCH ABROAD (1-9) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the senior or advanced level, taken on an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLFR 4020 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND STYLISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLFR 3030 or FLFR 3040 or Departmental approval. Practice in writing and analyzing French texts, with emphasis on advanced grammar topics and stylistics.

FLFR 4030 FRENCH CONTINUING CONVERSATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLFR 3030 or FLFR 3040 or Departmental approval. Continuing practice in spoken French to maintain and upgrade proficiency. Major credit will not be given for FLFR or FLFT majors.

FLFR 4040 FRENCH CONTINUING COMPOSITION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLFR 3030 or FLFR 3040 or Departmental approval. Continuing practice in written French to maintain and upgrade proficiency.

FLFR 4310 FRENCH FOR INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. A grade of D or higher in FLFR 3000-3999 or Departmental approval. Practical exercises in preparing and translating trade correspondence and documents in French as well as assigned group work and case studies under simulated on-the-job pressures.

FLFR 4410 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE, CULTURE, OR LANGUAGE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Completed 3 courses from FLFR 3000-3999 or LFRE minimum score of 428 or Departmental approval. Study of a special aspect or theme of the French language, literature, or culture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLFR 4740 TRANSLATION (3) LEC. 3. Basic techniques and problem areas in translating from French into English and from English into French.

FLFR 4930 ADVANCED DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) IND. Pr. A least 3 courses in FLFR 3000-3999. Directed study in area of special interest for the superior student in French. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLFR 4980 FRENCH SENIOR CAPSTONE (1) IND. 1. SU. Assessment of language skills through written and oral exams. Fall, Spring.

FLFR 5310 FRENCH FOR INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 4 courses each with a minimum grade of D in FLFR 3000-3999 or Departmental approval. Practice in managing, preparing, and translating international trade correspondence documents and related legal procedures in French. Development of case studies and other international trade group work in French and in English under simulated real-life pressures.

FLFR 5970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADVANCED LANGUAGE SKILLS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 4 courses each with a minimum grade of D in FLFR 3000-3999. Pr., Departmental approval. Review of principal grammatical structures, development of skills through appropriate exercises and class assignments, and improvement of stylistic sensitivity by exposure to a variety of language samples.

FLFR 5980 SEMINAR IN FRENCH LITERARY GENRES AND MOVEMENTS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 4 courses each with a minimum grade of D in FLFR 3000-3999 or Departmental approval. Seminar in advanced languages skills or topics from French literary genres and movements.

FLFR 6310 FRENCH FOR INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Practice in handling, preparing, and translating international trade correspondence documents and related legal procedures in French.

FLFR 6970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADVANCED LANGUAGE SKILLS (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Review of principal grammatical structures, development of skills through appropriate exercises and class assignments, and improvement of stylistic sensitivity by exposure to a variety of language samples.

FLFR 6980/6986 SEMINAR IN FRENCH LITERARY GENRES AND MOVEMENTS (3) AAB/SEM. 3. Departmental approval. eminar in advanced languages skills or topics from French literary genres and movements.

FLFR 7000 GRADUATE FRENCH ABROAD (1-9) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the graduate level taken in an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the French graduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLFR 7010 ADVANCED FRENCH CIVILIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. In-depth study of French civilization with emphasis on the relationship of history, arts, and literature from prehistoric times to the present.

FLFR 7020 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND STYLISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Acquisition of advanced writing skills in French. Techniques and strategies of appropriate stylistic expression through analysis of various sources of texts, including literary, historical, commercial, and popular.

FLFR 7090 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE-LEVEL FRENCH INSTRUCTION (1) LEC. 1. SU. Pr., Departmental approval. Orientation for graduate students in French. Introduction to teaching at the college-level, including observation of performance and guidance by designated instructors.

FLFR 7430 FRENCH PRESS (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Political, intellectual, and cultural events in France, Europe, and the world as reflected in major French daily and weekly publications.

FLFR 7740 ADVANCED TRANSLATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval Acquisition of skills for translation from French to English and from English to French using a wide variety of texts including historical, literary, commercial, and popular sources.

FLFR 7920 FOREIGN LANGUAGE CAREER INTERNSHIP (1-6) INT. Pr., Departmental approval. Experiential learning either in the business community or in university-sponsored programs outside the United States. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLFR 7930 DIRECTED STUDIES IN LANGUAGE SKILLS (3) IND. 3. Departmental approval. Pr., Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLFR 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FRENCH LANGUAGE, LITERATURE OR CULTURE (1-3) IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Study in a specialized area under close supervision of an instructor. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLFR 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3) AAB/SEM. Pr., Departmental approval. Study of a specific aspect of the French language, literature, or culture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

Foreign Lng-German Courses

FLGR 1000 ELEMENTARY GERMAN ABROAD (1-10) IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the elementary level in an approved Study Abroad program. Credit may substitute for required 1000-level courses in German. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLGR 1010 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Fundamentals of German language skills stressed. Exposure to Germanic civilization. For students with no previous background or less than two years of high school German.

FLGR 1020 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LGER score of 0241 or FLGR 1010. or acceptable score on the FL placement test. Review of basic German grammar and vocabulary. Fundamentals of German language skills with progressive emphasis on conversation. Fulfills the College of Liberal Arts foreign language core requirement.

FLGR 1030 READING PROFICIENCY IN GERMAN (3) LEC. 3. Instruction to enable graduate students to read and understand scholarly material in German related to their field of student. requirements. May not be used to satisfy undergraduate language requirements. Fall.

FLGR 1100/1103 ACCELERATED ELEMENTARY GERMAN (6) LEC. 6. Basic concepts of German grammar, vocabulary, and culture. Fulfills the College of Liberal Arts foreign language requirement.

FLGR 2000 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the intermediate level taken in an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the German undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLGR 2010 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LGER score of 0325 or FLGR 1020. or acceptable score on FL placement test. Language skills stressed; structural review and composition; readings in German literature and German civilization.

FLGR 2020 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LGER score of 0372 or FLGR 2010. or acceptable score on FL placement test. Continued review of German grammar and syntax, vocabulary building. Additional work in composition; readings in German literature and civilization.

FLGR 3000 JUNIOR ADVANCED GERMAN ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the advanced level taken in an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the German undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLGR 3010 BEGINNING GERMAN COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LGER score of 0428 or FLGR 2020. or acceptable score on FL placement test. Developing skills in written and spoken German. German grammar and syntax, vocabulary building. German phonology. Fall.

FLGR 3020 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LGER score of 0428 or FLGR 2020. or acceptable score on FL placement test. Further development of skills in written and spoken German; continued review of selected topics of grammar and syntax, and vocabulary acquisition. Spring.

FLGR 3030 ADVANCED GERMAN COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LGER score of 0428 or FLGR 2020. or acceptable score on FL placement test. Introduction of linguistic principles governing mechanics of spoken German; emphasizes English-German contrast and pronunciation difficulties; further development of conversation skills.

FLGR 3050 GERMAN CINEMA (3-6) LEC. Sampling of important films from the 1920s to the present, including the intellectual, historical, cultural, and literary matrix of each film. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLGR 3100 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 2020 or Departmental approval. Basic literary genres and major figures in German literature from the 18th century to the present; literary methodologies and bibliographical tools. Required of all majors. Fall.

FLGR 3110 GERMAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 2020 or Departmental approval. Social, political, and cultural history of Germany from the Germanic tribes to 1870. Fall.

FLGR 3120 GERMAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 2020 or Departmental approval. Social, political and cultural history of Germany from 1870 to the present. Spring.

FLGR 3150 TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 2020 or LGER score of 0428 or Departmental approval. Critical study of specific literary, linguistic, and/or cultural topics related to Germany. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

FLGR 3200 LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM SEMINAR IN GERMAN (1) LEC. 1. Pr. FLGR 2010 or Departmental approval. Language component with readings and in-class discussions to complement a lecture course in English and in a discipline other than German. Parallel enrollment is recommended. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLGR 3930 DIRECTED STUDIES IN GERMAN (1-3) IND. Pr. LGER score of 0428 or Departmental approval. Directed study in area of special interest for the superior student in German. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLGR 4000 SENIOR ADVANCED GERMAN ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the senior/advanced level taken in an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the German undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLGR 4110 MASTERPIECES OF GERMAN LITERATURE I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 3010 or Departmental approval. Selected readings by representative authors from the periods of German Classicism, Romanticism, and Realism Naturalism. Fall.

FLGR 4120 MASTERPIECES OF GERMAN LITERATURE II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 3010 or Departmental approval. Selected readings by representative authors from the periods of the early 20th century, Weimar Republic, and Postwar Germany.

FLGR 4150 GERMAN DRAMA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Completed 3 courses from FLGR 3000-3999 or LGER minimum score of 438. or Departmental approval.Consideration, analysis, and criticism of selected German theater works by representative authors. Fall.

FLGR 4160 CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Completed 3 courses from FLGR 3000-3999 or LGER minimum score of 438 or Departmental approval. Consideration, analysis, and criticism of recent selected German literary works.

FLGR 4310 GERMAN FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 2020 or Departmental approval. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in professional, commercial German. Familiarization with German and European business practices. Fall.

FLGR 4320 GERMAN FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS II (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Refinement of language proficiency skills. Active preparation for Prufung Wirtschaftsdeutsch International, an examination recognized worldwide by business and industry. Spring.

FLGR 4330 GERMAN BUSINESS, MEDIA, AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLGR 2020 or LGER score of 0428. German language for business German media and society.

FLGR 4510 GERMAN LITERATURE TRANSLATION I (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. From Goethe to Thomas Mann. Reading and analysis of significant literary works by major German writers from 1750 to 1945.

FLGR 4520 GERMAN LITERATURE TRANSLATION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Postwar German literature. Reading and analysis of significant literary works by major German writers from 1945 to the present.

FLGR 4910 PRACTICUM IN GERMAN (1-6) PRA. Pr., Departmental approval. Practical work experience related to major field. Number of credit hours and applicability toward major to be determined in consultation with the undergraduate director. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLGR 4950 SEMINAR IN GERMAN LITERATURE (3) SEM. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in FLGR 3000-3999 or Departmental approval. Readings in German literature from selected periods or in selected genres.

FLGR 4980 SENIOR CAPSTONE (1) IND. 1. SU. Assessment of language skills through written paper and oral exam. Fall, Spring.

Foreign Lng-Global Cultures Courses

FLGC 1150/1153 GLOBAL FLUENCY AND AWARENESS (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to non-native languages as representational reflections of two different cultural regions and impetus for in-depth analysis of global identities. May count either FLGC 1150 or FLGC 1153.

Foreign Lng-Greek Courses

FLGK 1010 ELEMENTARY CLASSICAL GREEK I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Classical Greek. Introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary for reading ancient Greek.

FLGK 1020 ELEMENTARY CLASSICAL GREEK II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLGK 1010 or Departmental approval. Introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary for reading ancient Greek. Fulfills College of Liberal Arts foreign language core requirement.

FLGK 2010 INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL GREEK I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLGK 1020 or Departmental approval. Introduction to reading ancient Greek. prose and poetry.

FLGK 2020 INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL GREEK II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLGK 2010 or Departmental approval. Classical Greek. Continuation of FLGK 2010.

FLGK 3110 CLASSICAL GREEK LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLGK 2010 or Departmental approval. Advanced readings in ancient Greek prose and poetry. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

FLGK 3510 CLASSICAL GREEK LITERATURE AND CULTURE IN TRANSLATION (3) LEC. 3. Classical Greek cultural practices and ideology with a focus on literary evidence. Readings in English. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLGK 3930 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ANCIENT GREEK LITERATURE (1-3) IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Independent study of classical Greek text(s). Topic proposed by student in conjunction with faculty advisor. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Foreign Lng-Italian Courses

FLIT 1000 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr. Departmental approval. Course work at the elementary level taken in an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult the Italian undergraduate advisor for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLIT 1010 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Basic language skills in Italian; exposure to culture.

FLIT 1020 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLIT 1010 or Departmental approval. Continuation of basic language skills; exposure to culture. Fulfills the College of Liberal Arts foreign language core requirement.

FLIT 2000 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the intermediate level taken in an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the Italian undergraduate advisor for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLIT 2010 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLIT 1020 or Departmental approval. Special emphasis on conversation and Italian culture. Language skills stressed, grammar review. Fall.

FLIT 2020 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLIT 2010 or Departmental approval. Special emphasis on reading skills and Italian culture. Review of Italian grammar for English speakers. Spring.

FLIT 3000 JUNIOR ADVANCED ITALIAN ABROAD (1-9) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the junior or advanced level taken in an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the Italian undergraduate advisor for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLIT 3030 ITALIAN CONVERSATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLIT 2010 or Departmental approval. Intensive practice in spoken Italian, based on texts and everyday situations, especially in contemporary Italian society; includes review of vocabulary.

FLIT 3040 ITALIAN COMPOSITION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLIT 2020 or Departmental approval. Review of grammar and practice in writing on topics ranging from descriptions and personal opinions to current affairs and social problems.

FLIT 3050 ITALIAN CINEMA (3) LEC. 3. Sampling of important films from the time of the telefoni bianchi (1937) to the present (major directors and trends), including the intellectual, historical, cultural, and literary matrix of each film.

FLIT 3110 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ITALIAN (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLIT 2010 or Departmental approval. Supplementary instruction in Italian language, literature, culture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLIT 3200 LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM SEMINAR IN ITALIAN (1) LEC. 11. Pr. FLIT 1020 or Departmental approval. Language component with readings and in-class discussions to complement a lecture course in English and in a discipline other than Italian. Parallel enrollment is recommended. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLIT 3510 INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN CULTURE IN ENGLISH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Italian culture, as reflected in arts, film, literature, history. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLIT 3930 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ITALIAN (1-3) IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Directed study in area of special interest for the superior student in Italian. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

FLIT 5970 SEMINAR IN ITALIAN LITERATURE, LINGUISTICS, AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Opportunity to pursue topics of special interest, not treated in other course offerings. Each student will develop an individual plan of study, with faculty approval.

FLIT 6970/6976 SEMINAR IN ITALIAN LITERATURE, LINGUISTICS, AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Opportunity to pursue topics of special interest, not treated in other course offerings. Each student will develop an individual plan of study, with faculty approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

Foreign Lng-Japanese Courses

FLJP 1000 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE ABROAD (1-10) LEC. Course work at the elementary level take on an approved Study Abroad program. Learning modern Japanese listening, writing, and reading in an integrated manner through an approved Study Abroad program. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLJP 1010 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Fundamentals of Japanese. Stress on language skills with progressive emphasis on conversation; exposure to Japanese civilization. Fall.

FLJP 1020 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLJP 1010 or Departmental approval. Stress on language skills; structural review and composition: readings in Japanese literature and exposure to Japanese culture and civilization.

FLJP 2000 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE ABROAD (1-10) AAB/LEC. Pr. FLJP 1020 or Departmental approval. Continued development of proficiency in modern Japanese through an approved Study Abroad program; focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading within cultural contexts. Students should consult with the Spanish undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLJP 2010 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLJP 1020 or Departmental approval. Stress on language skills; structural review and composition; readings in Japanese literature; and exposure to Japanese culture and civilization. Spring.

FLJP 2020 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLJP 2010 or Departmental approval. Continuation of FLJP 2010. Language skills; structural review and composition; readings in Japanese literature; and exposure to Japanese culture and civilization. Spring.

FLJP 3000 ADVANCED JAPANESE ABROAD (1-10) AAB/LEC. Pr. FLJP 1020 or Departmental approval. Continued development of proficiency in modern Japanese through an approved Study Abroad program; focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading within cultural contexts. Students should consult with the Spanish undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLJP 3010 JAPANESE COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (3-6) AAB. Pr. FLJP 2010 or Departmental approval. Intensive practice of written and spoken Japanese, based on contemporary social situations and texts. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLJP 3050 JAPANESE CINEMA (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to Japanese films, with particular focus on representations of history from the 1930s to the present. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLJP 3450 TOPICS IN JAPANESE LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3-6) AAB/LEC. Critical study of specific Japanese literary and cultural topics. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLJP 3930 DIRECTED STUDY IN JAPANESE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLJP 2020. Directed study in area of special interest for the superior student in Japanese. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Foreign Lng-Korean Courses

FLKN 1010 ELEMENTARY KOREAN I (4) LEC. 4. Course for beginners without any background in Korean. This class will help students learn all four skills of modern Korean: speaking, listening, writing, and reading.

FLKN 1020 ELEMENTARY KOREAN II (4) LEC. 4. Pr. FLKN 1010. Course to help students continue to learn all four skills of modern Korean: speaking, listening, writing, and reading.

Foreign Lng-Latin Courses

FLLN 1010 ELEMENTARY LATIN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. For students with little or no knowledge of Latin. Knowledge and skills necessary for reading classical Latin.

FLLN 1020 ELEMENTARY LATIN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLLN 1010 or Departmental approval. Introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary for reading classical Latin. Fulfills College of Liberal Arts core foreign language requirement.

FLLN 2010 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLLN 1020. or four years of high school Latin or Departmental approval. Review of classical Latin grammar with reading of selections from Latin literature. Fall.

FLLN 2020 INTERMEDIATE LATIN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLLN 2010. or Departmental approval.. Continuation of FLLN 2010. Review of classical Latin grammar with reading of selections from Latin literature. Fulfills the College of Liberal Arts foreign language core requirement.

FLLN 3030 READING PROFICIENCY IN LATIN (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Instruction to enable graduate students to read and understand scholarly material in Latin related to their field of study. May not be used to satisfy undergraduate language requirements. To prepare graduate students to pass the graduate proficiency exam in Latin. Students should check with their graduate director for departmental language requirements before enrolling.

FLLN 3110 LATIN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLLN 2010 or Departmental approval. Advanced readings in Latin prose and poetry. Course may be repeated with change in topic.

FLLN 3200 LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM SEMINAR IN LATIN (1) LEC. 1. Pr. FLLN 1020 or Departmental approval. Language component with readings and in-class discussions to complement a lecture course in English and in a language other than Latin. Parallel enrollment is recommended. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLLN 3510 ROMAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE IN TRANSLATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127. Roman cultural practices and ideology with a focus on literary evidence. Readings in English. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLLN 3930 DIRECTED STUDIES IN LATIN LITERATURE (1-3) IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Independent study of Latin texts. Topic proposed by student in conjunction with faculty advisor. Course may be repeated with change in topic.

Foreign Lng-Russian Courses

FLRU 1010/1013 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Fundamentals of Russian. Language skills; progressive emphasis on conversation; exposure to Russian culture and civilization.

FLRU 1020/1023 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLRU 1010 or FLRU 1013. Fundamentals of Russian. Stress on language skills; progressive emphasis on conversation; exposure to Russian culture and civilization. Fulfills College of Liberal Arts foreign language core requirement.

FLRU 2010 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLRU 1020 or FLRU 1023 or Departmental approval. Language skills; structural review and composition: continued exposure to Russian civilization.

FLRU 2020 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. FLRU 2010 or Departmental approval. Language skills; structural review and composition; continued exposure to Russian civilization.

FLRU 2510 RUSSIAN CULTURE IN ENGLISH (3) LEC. 3. Intensive exposure to Russian culture from the 10th century to the Revolution as reflected in the fine arts and literature.

FLRU 2520 RUSSIA TODAY IN ENGLISH (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to Russian culture from the Revolution to the present, as reflected in the fine arts and literature.

Foreign Lng-Spanish Courses

FLSP 1000 ELEMENTARY SPANISH ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the elementary level in an approved Study Abroad program credit may substitute for required 1000-level courses in Spanish. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLSP 1010/1013 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Basic language skills stressed with progressive emphasis on conversation. Exposure to Hispanic civilization. For students with less than two years of high school Spanish.

FLSP 1020/1023 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LSPA score of 0241 or FLSP 1010 or FLSP 1013. or acceptable score on FL placement test. Fundamentals of Spanish language skills stressed with progressive emphasis on conversation. Exposure to Hispanic civilization. Fulfills College of Liberal Arts foreign language core requirement.

FLSP 1030 READING PROFICIENCY IN SPANISH (3) LEC. 3. SU. Pr., Departmental approval. Instruction to enable graduate students to read and understand scholarly material in Spanish related to their field of study. May not be used to satisfy undergraduate language requirements. Spring.

FLSP 2000 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH ABROAD (1-10) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the intermediate level taken on an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the Spanish undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLSP 2010 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LSPA score of 0325 or FLSP 1020. or acceptable score on FL placement test or Departmental approval. Review of grammatical structures, development of reading and writing skills, and increased understanding of Hispanic cultures. Fall, Spring.

FLSP 2017 HONORS INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. FLSP 1020 or LSPA score of 0325. Review of grammatical structures, development of reading and writing skills, and increased understanding of Hispanic cultures.

FLSP 2020 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. LSPA score of 0372 or FLSP 2010. or acceptable score on FL placement test. Continued review of grammatical structures, development of reading and writing skills, and increased understanding of Hispanic cultures. Fall, Spring.

FLSP 2027 HONORS INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. FLSP 2010 or FLSP 2013 or FLSP 2017 or LSPA score of 0372. Continued review of grammatical structures, development of reading and writing skills, and increased understanding of Hispanic cultures.

FLSP 3000 JUNIOR ADVANCED SPANISH ABROAD (1-9) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the junior or advanced level taken on an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the Spanish undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

FLSP 3010 SPANISH PHONETICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LSPA score of 0428 or FLSP 2020. Training in practical phonetics with an emphasis on pronunciation correctives. Fall, Spring.

FLSP 3050 SPANISH SYNTAX (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 2020. In this course, the function of the different parts of speech (e.g., prepositions, adverbs, determiners, pronouns, verbs, conjunctions) will be examined, and students will learn to diagram simple and complex hierarchical sentence structure using syntactic trees.

FLSP 3060 COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS IN SPANISH I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LSPA score of 0428 or FLSP 2020. The first in a two semester sequence designed to improve speaking and writing, with additional emphasis placed on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammar, listening and reading comprehension. Uses literary and cultural texts to develop cultural awareness.

FLSP 3070 COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS IN SPANISH II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3060. The second in a two semester sequence designed to improve speaking and writing, with additional emphasis placed on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammar, listening and reading comprehension. Uses literary and cultural texts to develop cultural awareness.

FLSP 3080 INTRO TO CULTURAL ANALYSIS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3060. A general introduction to the analysis of Hispanic societies through their diverse cultural practices, local customs, and languages. This class explores how were Hispanic societies formed, the effects of globalization, and their diverse cultural and national identities.

FLSP 3100 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3060. Study of literary genres, rhetorical figures, and other critical concepts. Literary analysis of Spanish and Spanish-American texts. Fall, Spring.

FLSP 3110 CULTURES OF SPAIN (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3080. An introduction to the social and cultural diversity of Spain. This class explores the ethnic and linguistic diversity of the country, the historical events that forged contemporary Spain, and the cultural plurality of the country.

FLSP 3130 TOPICS IN HISPANIC FILM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3060 and FLSP 3080. Study of film as a window into Hispanic cultures, both Spanish and Spanish American. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLSP 3140 TOPICS IN HISPANIC MUSIC (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3060 and FLSP 3080. Study of the interrelationship of Hispanic music and Spanish and Spanish-American cultures. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLSP 3150 TOPICS IN HISPANIC MEDIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3060 and FLSP 3080. Develops students' cultural awareness through a series of written assignments organized around major journalistic and academic genres. We will investigate contemporary issues as presented in the media of Spain, Latin America and U.S. Latino communities.

FLSP 3200 LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM SEMINAR IN SPANISH (1) LEC. 1. Pr. FLSP 2010 or Departmental approval. Language component with readings and in-class discussions to complement a lecture course in English and in a discipline other than Spanish. Parallel enrollment is recommended. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLSP 3210 CULTURES OF SPANISH AMERICA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3080. An introduction to the social and cultural diversity of Spanish America. This class explores the cultural, ethnic and linguistic diversity of the Spanish American countries, and the historical events that forged them.

FLSP 3220 HISPANIC CULTURES IN THE U.S. (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3080. An introduction to the social and cultural diversity of Hispanic U.S. This class explores the diversity in ethnicity, traditions, and arts of Hispanics in the country, the historical events that forged such diversity, and their cultural plurality.

FLSP 3310 SPANISH TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070. Introduction to the techniques of English/Spanish and Spanish/English translation in a commercial environment, including correspondence, technical documents, advertising and oral translation. Fall.

FLSP 3930 DIRECTED STUDY IN SPANISH (3) IND. 3. Pr. FLSP 3000. Development of an advanced-level of Spanish proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLSP 4000 SENIOR ADVANCED SPANISH ABROAD (1-9) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the senior/advanced level taken on an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the Spanish undergraduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLSP 4010 ORAL PROFICIENCY IN SPANISH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070. Proficiency oriented course designed to further develop speaking and comprehension skills in Spanish in a variety of topics.

FLSP 4020 CONTINUING SPANISH SYNTAX (1-3) AAB/IND. Departmental approval. Continuing practice in Spanish syntax. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FLSP 4030 SPANISH LINGUISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070. This course introduces students to Spanish linguistics and the basic concepts of some of its principal branches. The primary areas include phonetics and phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics, history of the Spanish language, and linguistics as a cognitive science.

FLSP 4110 MASTERPIECES OF SPANISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3100. Major works of Spanish literature from medieval times to the present. Fall.

FLSP 4120 TOPICS IN SPANISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3100. Readings in Spanish literature. Course may be repeated with change in topic. Spring.

FLSP 4210 MASTERPIECES OF SPANISH-AMER LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3100. Major works of Spanish American literature from colonial times to the present. Fall.

FLSP 4220 TOPICS IN SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3100. Readings in Spanish-American Literature. Course may be repeated with a change in topic. Spring.

FLSP 4310 BUSINESS SPANISH I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070. Business vocabulary and terminology, business practices, and cultural influences in the Hispanic world.

FLSP 4330 TOPICS IN HISPANIC COMMERCIAL WORLD (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070. Study of an aspect of Spanish business terminology or documentation. Course may be repeated with change in topic.

FLSP 4420 TOPICS IN HISPANIC LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3060 and FLSP 3080 or Departmental approval. Analysis of the cultural milieu influencing artistic creativity within a historical period. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLSP 4510 SPANISH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127 or Departmental approval. Major works of Spanish literature in English translation.

FLSP 4520 SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1127 or Departmental approval. Major works of Spanish-American literature in English translation.

FLSP 4910 PRACTICUM IN SPANISH (1-3) AAB/PRA. Pr., Departmental approval. Practical work experience related to the major field. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FLSP 4980 SENIOR CAPSTONE (1) IND. 1. SU. Assessment of language skills through written and oral exams. Fall, Spring.

FLSP 5010 ADVANCED SPANISH PHONETICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070. Advanced training in Spanish phonetics with specific course materials determined by needs of students.

FLSP 5020 ADVANCED SPANISH SYNTAX (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070. Advanced training in Spanish syntax and stylistics with specific course materials determined by needs of students.

FLSP 5030 ADVANCED CULTURE AND LITERATURE OF THE SPANISH SPEAKING WORLD (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FLSP 3070 and FLSP 3080. A grade of C or better in at least 4 courses FLSP 3000-3999 or departmental approval. Advanced training in Culture and literature of the Spanish speaking world with specific course materials determined by faculty. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLSP 6010 ADVANCED SPANISH PHONETICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 4 courses each with a minimum grade of D in FLSP 3000-3999. Four courses or Departmental approval. Advanced training in Spanish phonetics with specific course materials determined by needs of students.

FLSP 6020 ADVANCED SPANISH SYNTAX (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 4 courses each with a minimum grade of D in FLSP 3000-3999. Four courses or Departmental approval. Advanced training in Spanish syntax and stylistics with specific course materials determined by needs of students.

FLSP 6030 ADVANCED CULTURE AND LITERATURE OF SPANISH SPEAKING WORLD (3) LEC. 3. Advanced training in Culture and literature of the Spanish speaking world with specific course materials determined by faculty. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FLSP 7000 GRADUATE SPANISH ABROAD (1-9) AAB/FLD. Pr., Departmental approval. Course work at the graduate level taken on an approved Study Abroad program. Students should consult with the Spanish graduate director for an estimation of credit prior to going abroad. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FLSP 7010 HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE (3) LEC. 3. Diachronic study of the development of the Spanish language from its Latin origins to the present.

FLSP 7020 SPANISH LINGUISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Synchronic study of the Spanish language focusing on phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon, taking into consideration dialectal differences.

FLSP 7030 APPLIED SPANISH LINGUISTICS (3) LEC. 3. Critical study of current research in applied linguistics regarding the acquisition of Spanish by non-native speakers, with emphasis on the problems faced by adult English-speaking individuals.

FLSP 7050 LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Contemporary literary criticism and theory as it relates to Spanish and Spanish-American literature.

FLSP 7060 RESEARCH METHODS (1) LEC. 1. SU. Methods of scholarly investigation in literary history and criticism. Credit may not be used to satisfy degree requirements.

FLSP 7090 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE LEVEL SPANISH INSTRUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Instruction for GTAs, including critical observation in performance and guidance by a designated supervisory professor. Required of all students who hold a graduate teaching assistantship.

FLSP 7100 SPANISH MEDIEVAL LITERATURE I (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of medieval Spanish literature through representative texts from the various genres of the period beginning with the origins of Spanish literature until 1299.

FLSP 7110 SPANISH MEDIEVAL LITERATURE II (3) LEC. 3. Study of medieval Spanish literature through representative texts from the various genres of the period 1300-1500.

FLSP 7120 16TH-CENTURY SPANISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of representative literary works in all genres from around 1492 to the end of the 16th century.

FLSP 7130 17TH-CENTURY SPANISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of representative literary works in all genres in the 17th century with emphasis on Baroque literature.

FLSP 7140 SURVEY OF 18TH AND 19TH-CENTURY SPANISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Survey of the major literary, cultural, and historical trends in 18th and 19th century Spanish literature.

FLSP 7150 HISPANIC COLONIAL LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES (3) LEC. 3. Literature about the colonial Hispanic exploration and colonization of the United States from the 16th to 19th centuries.

FLSP 7160 20TH-CENTURY SPANISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of 20th-century Peninsular literature from the Generation of 98 to Spanish post-war literature through representative works in all genres.

FLSP 7170 CONTEMPORARY SPANISH LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of contemporary literature from the Spanish Civil War to the present through representative works in all genres.

FLSP 7210 COLONIAL SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) LEC. 3. Study of representative literary genres and authors of Vice Regal America from Spanish transcription of pre-Columbian works to those just prior to the Wars of Independence.

FLSP 7220 SPANISH-AMERICAN POETRY I (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of Spanish-American poetry from 1824 to the first generation of modernism.

FLSP 7230 SPANISH-AMERICAN POETRY II (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of Spanish-American poetry from post-modernism to the present.

FLSP 7240 SPANISH-AMERICAN POST-COLONIAL PROSE TEXTS TO THE NEW NARRATIVE (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of representative essayists and fiction writers of the 19th and 20th centuries predating the New Narrative.

FLSP 7250 THE NEW NARRATIVE IN SPANISH-AMERICAN FICTION: MODERNIST AND POST-MODERNIST TEXTS (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of major works of modernist and post-modernist fiction that achieved international acclaim during the second half of the 20th century.

FLSP 7270 SPANISH AMERICAN THEATER I (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of the Spanish-American theater, with emphasis on the period prior to 1900.

FLSP 7280 SPANISH AMERICAN THEATER II (3) LEC. 3. Critical and historical study of the Spanish-American theater from 1900 to present.

FLSP 7300 DON QUIJOTE (3) LEC. 3. Critical study of Cervantes' masterpiece.

FLSP 7970/7976 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS, LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3) AAB/SEM. 3. Pr., BA in Spanish or BS in Foreign Language Education in Spanish. In-depth study of an author or authors and analysis of the cultural milieu influencing their creativity or investigation of a specific linguistic phenomenon in Spanish. Course may be repeated with a change in topic. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

FLSP 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Directed readings and research culminating in a thesis. Course may be repeated with change in topic.

Health Administration Courses

HADM 2100/2103 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Prefixes, suffixes, and word roots used in the language of medicine; medical vocabulary and terms related to the health care field.

HADM 3000 GATEWAY TO HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION (3) LEC. 3. Basic concepts and principles of health care administration.

HADM 3300 HEALTH CARE POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 3000 and (ACCT 2110 or ACCT 2117) and (MATH 1680 or MATH 1683 or MATH 1610 or MATH 1613 or MATH 1617) and (P/C HADM 2100 or P/C HADM 2103). Political policies that affect health care services.

HADM 3700 HEALTH LAW (3) LEC. 3. Legal issues that arise between patients and health care providers.

HADM 3800 HEALTH CARE ANALYTICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (STAT 2010 or STAT 2017 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2513 or STAT 2610) and (MATH 1610 or MATH 1613 or MATH 1617 or MATH 1680 or MATH 1683) and (ACCT 2110 or ACCT 2117). Majors only. This course focuses on using big data to drive decision making and improve health care quality through data aggregation and validation, strategic management data manipulation and technical reporting implementation.

HADM 4000 DEVELOPING CARE ORGANIZATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 3300 and HADM 3800. Health Services Administration major only. Organizational strategies for effective interfacing of medical, nursing, allied health and administrative staff with patient needs.

HADM 4200 HEALTH CARE INSURANCE AND REIMBURSEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 3000 and HADM 3700 and HADM 3800. Health Services Administration major only. Health insurance operations, principles, payment methods and contracts.

HADM 4800 HEALTH ADMINISTRATION AND REGULATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 4000. Health Services Administration major only. Government regulatory programs affecting administration of health services organizations.

HADM 4810 CHANGE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 4000. Health Services Administration major only. Changes in modern technology, cultural diversity, and governmental policies on the administration of health services organizations.

HADM 4820 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 4000. Health Services Administration major only. Analysis of the components (e.g. nursing homes, home health care) of the long-term care system for the elderly.

HADM 4830 COMPARATIVE HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 4000. Health Services Administration major only. Comparative Study and analysis of health care systems around the world.

HADM 4850 LONG-TERM CARE POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 4000. Health Services Administration major only. Policy issues surrounding the provision of long-term care to the elderly.

HADM 4880 HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 4000 and HADM 4200. Health Services Admiistration major only. Overview and utilization of health care information technology in health care administration.

HADM 4920 INTERNSHIP (6) AAB/INT. 6. SU. Pr. HADM 4000 and HADM 4200 and FINC 3810 or (FINC 3610 or FINC 3613 or FINC 3617) and (HRMN 3420 or HRMN 3423) or (MNGT 3423 or MNGT 3420). Health Services Administration major only. Internship in selected areas of Health Administration.

HADM 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) AAB/IND. Pr. HADM 3000 and ACCT 2100 and (MATH 1680 or MATH 1683) and (MATH 1610 or MATH 1613 or MATH 1617) and (STAT 2010 or STAT 2017) or (STAT 2510 or STAT 2513) or STAT 2610. Health Services Administration major only. This course is designed to facilitate an independent study in an area of special interest of the student and a sponsoring faculty member. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

HADM 4950 CAPSTONE SEMINAR (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HADM 4000 and HADM 4200 and (FINC 3810 or FINC 3610 or FINC 3613 or FINC 3617). Health Services Administratrion major only. Integrates knowledge from courses and internship; applies managerial and research skills to the completion of a research project and the organization of a research symposium.

HADM 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (1-6) IND. Pr. HADM 3300. Directed readings in Health Administration. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HADM 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) ST1. 3. Pr. HADM 3000 and (ACCT 2110 or ACCT 2117) and (MATH 1680 or MATH 1683) or (MATH 1610 or MATH 1613 or MATH 1617). Health Services Administration major only. Special Topics courses are used to inform and educate students about new and emerging changes within the health care field. The Topics addressed change to coincide with changes in the health care environment. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

History Courses

HIST 1000 AUBURN IN THE WORLD: INDUSTRY AND SOCIETY (4) LEC. 4. LAB. 0. Pr., Auburn Global and/or international students. Part of the Auburn Global International Accelerator Program, HIST1000 exposes first-year students to Auburn, Alabama, and regional history from a wide range of perspectives, among them social, cultural, and environmental changes, economics, technology, and politics.

HIST 1010/1013 WORLD HISTORY I (3) LEC. 3. History Core. Survey of world history from early humanity to the late 18th century. Examines the record of human political, social, cultural, religious, and economic activities across time, regions, civilizations, and cultures. May count either HIST 1010 or HIST 1013.

HIST 1017 HONORS WORLD HISTORY I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. History Core. A survey of world history from early humanity to the late 18th century.

HIST 1020 WORLD HISTORY II (3) LEC. 3. History Core. Survey of world history since the Industrial Revolution.

HIST 1027 HONORS WORLD HISTORY II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. History Core. Survey of world history since the Industrial Revolution.

HIST 1210 TECHNOLOGY AND CIVILIZATION I (3) LEC. 3. History Core. Survey of the role of technology in history from prehistoric times to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.

HIST 1217 HONORS TECHNOLOGY AND CIVILIZATION I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. History Core. Survey of the role of technology in history from prehistoric times to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.

HIST 1220 TECHNOLOGY AND CIVILIZATION II (3) LEC. 3. History Core. Survey of the role of technology from the Industrial Revolution to the present day.

HIST 1227 HONORS TECHNOLOGY AND CIVILIZATION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. History Core. Survey of the role of technology from the Industrial Revolution to the present day.

HIST 2010/2013 SURVEY OF UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877 (3) LEC. 3. Social, political, and economic development of the United States from earliest occupation through Reconstruction. May count either HIST 2010 or HIST 2013.

HIST 2017 HONORS SURVEY OF UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Social, political, and economic development of the United States from earliest occupation through Reconstruction.

HIST 2020 SURVEY OF UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1877 (3) LEC. 3. Social, political, and economic development of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present.

HIST 2070 SURVEY OF EUROPEAN HISTORY FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO 1789 (3) LEC. 3. Survey of European history from the first outbreak of the bubonic plague to the eve of the French Revolution.

HIST 2080 SURVEY OF EUROPEAN HISTORY FROM 1789 PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. European history from the French Revolution to the present.

HIST 2100 SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Latin American history from its Amerindian beginnings to the present.

HIST 2110 SURVEY OF ASIAN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Asian history from prehistoric times to the present.

HIST 2120 SURVEY OF MODERN AFRICAN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Modern African history, from the end of the slave trade to the rise of nationalism and independence.

HIST 2130 SURVEY OF MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to the history and culture of the Middle East.

HIST 3000 HISTORY OF SOUTHEASTERN INDIANS (3) LEC. 3. History of the southeastern Indians from pre-contact to removal, including native culture, cultural change, trade, imperial rivalries, and wars.

HIST 3010 HISTORY OF ALABAMA (3) LEC. 3. Broad study of Alabama history since its European settlement.

HIST 3020 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES (3) LEC. 3. History of women in America from colonial period to the present; explores differences of region, race, and class.

HIST 3030 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. History of African Americans from African origins to the modern era, focusing on enslavement, emancipation and the struggle for equal rights.

HIST 3040 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Religious ideas and institutions from the colonial period to the present, including how religion has intersected with political and social history.

HIST 3050 HISTORY OF POLITICAL PARTIES IN THE UNITED STATES (3) LEC. 3. Political parties and party systems from the Constitution to the present, including party organization, campaign techniques and presidential leadership.

HIST 3060 ISSUES IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Issues and personalities in African-American history. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 3070 HISTORY OF UNITED STATES AIR POWER (3) LEC. 3. Development of air and spacecraft as weapons of war including doctrines, technology, major leaders and great events of air power.

HIST 3080 THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT (3) LEC. 3. History of the civil rights movement and its place in the broader African-American struggle for freedom. Social, political, and cultural history, with geographic and chronological focus on the United States South in the post-World War II period.

HIST 3090 HISTORY OF APPALACHIA (3) LEC. 3. Survey of the history of the Appalachian region from before European contact to the present.

HIST 3100 THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICAN MEMORY (3) LEC. 3. A survey of the ways that Americans have remembered their civil war from 1865 to the present.

HIST 3300 GRECO-ROMAN CIVILIZATION (3) LEC. 3. Classical civilizations of the Greeks and Romans as well as the Egyptian and Persian civilizations that influenced them.

HIST 3310 EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES (3) LEC. 3. Survey of the thousand years that has been called the birth of Europe.

HIST 3320 HISTORY OF IRELAND (3) LEC. 3. History of Ireland from its beginnings to the present, including discussion of the present.

HIST 3330 ISSUES IN THE HISTORY OF GERMANY AND CENTRAL EUROPE (3) LEC. 3. Variable topics in the history of Germans, Slavs, and other Central Europeans from the Era of Enlightened Absolutism through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 3340 ISSUES IN THE HISTORY OF MODERN FRANCE (3) LEC. 3. Focus on specific issues, themes, or topics within the political, social, or cultural history of France between the 18th and 20th centuries. Themes will vary.

HIST 3350 SURVEY OF RUSSIAN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Russian history from the earliest development of a state in the area of Kiev down to the present Russian Federation.

HIST 3360 CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA SINCE WORLD WAR II (3) LEC. 3. Developments in contemporary Russia since World War II.

HIST 3370 EUROPE AND THE WORLD (3) LEC. 3. Variable topics in the history of European interactions with non-European peoples, cultures, politics, and societies.

HIST 3500 HISTORY OF AVIATION (3) LEC. 3. History of aviation from the beginnings of human flight to the present.

HIST 3510 HISTORY OF SPACE TRAVEL (3) LEC. 3. Historical origins of the space age and United States space policy, including patterns that define the present and constrain the future of humans and machines.

HIST 3520 SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTIONS (3) LEC. 3. History of science, focusing on the concept of scientific revolutions in their social and intellectual context.

HIST 3530 SCIENCE FICTION AS INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Interaction between science, technology, and other aspects of modern culture as dramatized in classic and contemporary works of science fiction.

HIST 3540 ISSUES IN TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Issues such as the automobile, environment, industrialization, and popular culture relating to the role technology plays in society and culture. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 3550 AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Environmental history of the United States from colonial era to present.

HIST 3560 TECHNOLOGY AND GENDER HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Exploration of the relationship between gender and technology in comparative cultural, social, and historical perspectives from 18th century to present.

HIST 3570 THE AUTOMOBILE IN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Global history of the automobile, including technological developments as well as role of the automobile in culture.

HIST 3600 ISSUES IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Topics in the history of women and gender. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 3610 PRIVATE LIVES AND PUBLIC PLACES (3) LEC. 3. Examination of the shifting boundaries between the public and private in history including topics such as work, family, sexuality, and the state. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 3620 LANDSCAPE AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Social and cultural history of architecture and built-space in Europe and/or the United States.

HIST 3630 HISTORY OF MEXICO (3) LEC. 3. History of Mexico in the 19th and 20th centuries.

HIST 3640 WORLD MILITARY HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Economic, social, political, and technological roots of the ways of war employed by different civilizations throughout the ages.

HIST 3650 20TH-CENTURY WORLD WARS (3) LEC. 3. Causes, conduct, and consequences of World Wars I and II.

HIST 3660 WORLD NAVAL HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Naval history from its origins in ancient times to the present, including the evolution of strategy and tactics, and the influences of, foreign policy and technological change.

HIST 3670 CONTEMPORARY HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Examination of developments in the contemporary world to provide historical background on developments in selected areas or nations across the globe.

HIST 3800 HISTORIAN'S CRAFT (3) LEC. 3. Historical research methods and an introduction to historiography. For history majors only.

HIST 3920 HISTORY INTERNSHIP (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Supervised on-the-job experience at archives, historical museums, historic preservation authorities, historical editing projects, and similar historical agencies.

HIST 3930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Pr., Departmental approval and; 3.0 overall GPA. Individual reading or research projects in a specific area of history. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

HIST 3970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) LEC. 3. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 4950 SENIOR THESIS: HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800. with minimum grade of "C." Writing an original paper based on research in primary source materials.

HIST 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Secondary literature on specialized topics in history.

HIST 4997 HONORS THESIS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Writing an original paper based on research in primary materials.

HIST 5000 AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Development of the North American colonies from European settlement to 1763.

HIST 5010 AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND EARLY NATION: 1763-1800 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Revolutionary era and the foundations of the United States, including the struggle with England, Declaration of Independence, Revolutionary War, Confederation, Constitution, and Federalist-Republican conflicts.

HIST 5020 EARLY AMERICAN REPUBLIC: 1800-1850 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Development of the early nation, including the influences of Thomas War of 1812, Jacksonian democracy, Indian removal, Old South and slavery, westward movement, and political party conflicts.

HIST 5030 SOUTH TO 1877 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Development of the Old South, from southeastern Indians and European contact through Reconstruction, including slavery, white social classes, women, and politics.

HIST 5040 CIVIL WAR ERA: 1850-1877 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Sectional conflict, Civil War, and Reconstruction including sectional differences, political crises, secession, Civil War campaigns, emancipation, and presidential and congressional Reconstruction.

HIST 5050 THE SOUTH SINCE 1877 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Examination of the South since 1877, with emphasis on social, economic, cultural, political, and ideological developments.

HIST 5060 MAKING MODERN AMERICA: 1877-1929 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Development of the American economy, rise of big business, agrarian and labor protests, immigration, race relations, role of women, and role of government.

HIST 5070 MODERN UNITED STATES HISTORY: 1929 TO THE PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. United States history since 1929 with particular emphasis on the economy, changing role of government, America's role in world affairs and social changes.

HIST 5080 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES DIPLOMACY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3080 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Examination of United States diplomatic history since the Spanish-American War.

HIST 5300 EARLY MODERN EUROPE: 1348-1715 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Major topics in European history 1348-1715, including religious and cultural change and the relationship between state and society.

HIST 5310 ENLIGHTENMENT AND REVOLUTIONARY EUROPE: 1715-1815 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Culture, society, and politics of the 18th century; origins and consequences of the French Revolution; examination of the Napoleonic period.

HIST 5320 19TH CENTURY EUROPE: 1815-1918 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800. Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Cultural, economic, and social developments as well as the politics and international relations of the major European states.

HIST 5330 20TH CENTURY EUROPE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. History of Europe from the outbreak of World War I to the end of the Cold War.

HIST 5340 EUROPEAN CULTURAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Development of European culture and the interactions of culture, ideas, and social institutions from the early Enlightenment to the present.

HIST 5350 REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA: 1861-1939 (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Analysis of the revolutions of 1917, beginning with emancipation of serfs and ending with purges of the 1930's.

HIST 5360 MEDIEVAL BRITISH HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. British history from the Roman period to the Tudor dynasty.

HIST 5370 EARLY MODERN BRITISH HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. British history from 1485 to the early 18th century.

HIST 5380 MODERN BRITISH HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. British history from the political unification of England and Scotland to the present.

HIST 5500 THE GREAT TRANSFORMATION: THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. The Industrial Revolution of 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, with a major focus on England and the United States and some discussion of Europe and Asia.

HIST 5580 THE HISTORY OF FLIGHT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. History of flight in political, economic, social, and cultural perspective.

HIST 5600 MODERN EAST ASIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Examination and analysis of the political, social, economic, and intellectual changes in China and Japan from 1800-2000.

HIST 5610 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. European expansion into the western hemisphere from its Iberian background through the fall of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in the 19th century.

HIST 5620 MODERN LATIN AMERICA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. History of Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries, using a thematic approach arranged chronologically.

HIST 5640 HISTORY OF ISLAM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800. HIST 3800 with grade of "C" or better. This course examines the history of Islam and Islamic Islamic civilization from the seventh century to the present. Topics include theology, politics, society, and culture.

HIST 5650 HISTORY OF MODERN SOUTH ASIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Development of the Indo-Islamic culture, the British rule of India, and the creation of Muslim Pakistan and secular India. Attention to role of individuals and events in history of nation-building.

HIST 5660 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA: 1800-PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Examination and analysis of the political, social, economic, and intellectual changes in China from 1800-2000.

HIST 5670 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN: 1800-PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Examination and analysis of the political, social, economic, and intellectual changes in Japan from 1800-2000.

HIST 5680 AFRICA FROM 1800 TO PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Topics include state formation, ending of Atlantic slave trade and African slave trade and slavery, rise and fall of colonial rule, and current problems facing independent countries.

HIST 5710 FUNDAMENTALS OF ARCHIVAL THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Fundamentals of archival theory and practice; the relationship between archives and records management; and the role of records and archives in society.

HIST 5810 FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Overview of the public history field in its diverse venues and manifestations; ways in which historians engage various publics. Projects assigned to help students understand and experience how public historians carry out their work and responsibilities.

HIST 5820 HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in history must obtain a waiver from the department. Overview of historic preservation and cultural resource management in the United States and beyond. Considers modern preservation in terms of individuals, societies, and cultures and their relationships to the built environment and cultural landscape.

HIST 5970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. HIST 3800 or Departmental approval. Students not majoring in the history must obtain a waiver from the department. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 6000 AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Development of the North American colonies from European settlement to 1763.

HIST 6010 AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND EARLY NATION: 1763-1800 (3) LEC. 3. Revolutionary era and the foundations of the United States, including struggle with England, Declaration of Independence, Revolutionary War, Confederation, Constitution, and Federalist-Republican conflicts.

HIST 6020 EARLY AMERICAN REPUBLIC: 1800-1850 (3) LEC. 3. Development of the early nation, including the influences of Thomas Jefferson, War of 1812, Jacksonian democracy, Indian removal, Old South and slavery, westward movement, and political party conflict.

HIST 6030 SOUTH TO 1877 (3) LEC. 3. Development of the Old South, from southeastern Indians and European contact through Reconstruction, including slavery, white social classes, women, and politics.

HIST 6040 CIVIL WAR ERA: 1850-1877 (3) LEC. 3. Sectional conflict, Civil War, and Reconstruction, including sectional differences, political crises, secession, Civil War campaigns, emancipation, and presidential and congressional Reconstruction.

HIST 6050 THE SOUTH SINCE 1877 (3) LEC. 3. Examination of the South since 1877, with emphasis on social, economic, cultural, political, and ideological developments.

HIST 6060 MAKING MODERN AMERICA: 1877-1929 (3) LEC. 3. Development of the American economy, rise of big business, agrarian and labor protest, immigration, race relations, role of women, and role of government.

HIST 6070 MODERN UNITED STATES HISTORY: 1929 PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. United States history since 1929, with particular emphasis on the economy, changing role of government, America's role in world affairs, and social changes.

HIST 6080 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES DIPLOMACY (3) LEC. 3. Examination of United States diplomatic history since the Spanish-American War.

HIST 6300 EARLY MODERN EUROPE: 1348-1715 (3) LEC. 3. Major topics in European history 1348-1715, including religious and cultural change and the relationship between state and society.

HIST 6310 ENLIGHTENMENT AND REVOLUTIONARY EUROPE: 1715-1815 (3) LEC. 3. Culture, society, and politics of the 18th century; origins and consequences of the French Revolution; examination of the Napoleonic period.

HIST 6320 19TH CENTURY EUROPE: 1815-1918 (3) LEC. 3. Cultural, economic, and social developments as well as the politics and international relations of the major European states between 1815-1918.

HIST 6330 20TH CENTURY EUROPE (3) LEC. 3. History of Europe from the outbreak of World War I to the end of the Cold War.

HIST 6340 EUROPEAN CULTURAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Development of European culture and the interactions of culture, ideas, and social institutions from the early Enlightenment to the present.

HIST 6350 REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA: 1861-1939 (3) LEC. 3. Analysis of the revolutions of 1917, beginning with emancipation of serfs and ending with purges of the 1930s.

HIST 6360 MEDIEVAL BRITISH HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. British history from the Roman period to the Tudor dynasty.

HIST 6370 EARLY MODERN BRITISH HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. British history from 1485 to the early 18th century.

HIST 6380 MODERN BRITISH HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. British history from the political unification of England and Scotland to the present.

HIST 6500 THE GREAT TRANSFORMATION: THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION (3) LEC. 3. The Industrial Revolution of 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries with a major focus on England and the United States and some discussion of Europe and Asia.

HIST 6580 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF FLIGHT (3) LEC. 3. The history of flight in political, economic, social, and cultural perspective.

HIST 6600 MODERN EAST ASIA (3) LEC. 3. Examination and analysis of the political, social, economic, and intellectual changes in China and Japan from 1800-2000.

HIST 6610 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA (3) LEC. 3. European expansion into the western hemisphere from its Iberian background through 19th century, fall of the Spanish and Portuguese empires.

HIST 6620 MODERN LATIN AMERICA (3) LEC. 3. History of Latin America in 19th and 20th centuries using a thematic approach arranged chronologically.

HIST 6640 HISTORY OF ISLAM (3) LEC. 3. This course examines the history of Islam and Islamic civilization from the seventh century to the present. Topics include theology, politics, society, and culture.

HIST 6650 HISTORY OF MODERN SOUTH ASIA, 1750-PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Development of the Indo-Islamic culture, the British rule of India, and the creation of Muslim Pakistan and secular India. Attention to role of individuals and events in history of nation-building.

HIST 6660 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA: 1800-PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Examination and analysis of the political, social, economic and intellectual changes in China from 1800-2000.

HIST 6670 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN: 1800-PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Examination and analysis of the political, social, economic, and intellectual changes in Japan from 1800-2000.

HIST 6680 AFRICA FROM 1800 TO PRESENT (3) LEC. 3. Topics include state formation, ending of Atlantic slave trade and African slave trade and slavery, rise and fall of colonial rule, and current problems facing independent countries.

HIST 6710 FUNDAMENTALS OF ARCHIVAL THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Fundamentals of archival theory and practice; the relationship between archives and records management; and the role of records and archives in society.

HIST 6810 FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Overview of the public history field in its diverse venues and manifestations; ways in which historians engage various publics. Projects assigned to help students understand and experience how public historians carry out their work and responsibilities.

HIST 6820 HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Overview of historic preservation and cultural resource management in the United States and beyond. Considers modern preservation in terms of individuals, societies, and cultures and their relationships to the built environment and cultural landscape.

HIST 6970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7100 INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORIOGRAPHY (3) SEM. 3. Major historiographical trends in general American history and in particular sub-fields.

HIST 7110 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Development of the British North American colonies, including discussions concerning Indians, English background, exploration, settlement, rebellions, religion, slavery, imperial rivalries, and women.

HIST 7120 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND EARLY NATION (3) SEM. 3. Birth of the American nation and its re-birth under the Constitution.

HIST 7130 SEMINAR IN EARLY AMERICAN REPUBLIC (3) SEM. 3. Issues in the Early Republic, including political transformations, sectional conflict, women and gender roles, industrialization, and reform movements.

HIST 7140 SEMINAR IN OLD SOUTH (3) SEM. 3. History of the Old South, including discussions of colonial settlement, slavery, political transformations, sectional conflict, women and gender roles, and religion.

HIST 7150 SEMINAR IN CIVIL WAR ERA (3) SEM. 3. Sectional conflict, Civil War, and Reconstruction, including political, military and social development.

HIST 7160 SEMINAR IN NEW SOUTH (3) SEM. 3. The South in United States history since 1877.

HIST 7170 SEMINAR IN UNITED STATES PROGRESSIVE ERA (3) SEM. 3. In-depth history of the United States between 1877-1929.

HIST 7180 SEMINAR IN MODERN UNITED STATES HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Broad introduction to United States history since 1929.

HIST 7190 SEMINAR IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Analysis of the major historiographical works on the social, political, and economic history of African Americans.

HIST 7200 SEMINAR IN UNITED STATES WOMEN'S HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Change and continuity in the lives of American women.

HIST 7210 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Role of religion in American history; recent writing on religion; and sociological and anthropological theories of religion.

HIST 7220 DEVELOPMENT IN CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT (3) LEC. 3. In-depth study of the civil rights movement, with emphasis on the United States South in the post-World War II period. Major topics, basic literature, and historiographical debates examined.

HIST 7400 INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORIOGRAPHY (3) SEM. 3. Major topics and historiographical debates in European history from the Early Modern period to the 20th century.

HIST 7410 SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (3) SEM. 3. Topics in the history of continental Europe, 1348-1715, including religious and cultural change and the relationship between state and society.

HIST 7420 SEMINAR IN POPULAR CULTURE IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (3) SEM. 3. Major themes in the popular culture of Early Modern Europe, 1450-1800.

HIST 7430 SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN SOCIETY IN REVOLUTION (3) SEM. 3. Examination of the literature, concepts, and history of the transformation of Russian society between 1861 and 1939.

HIST 7440 SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN CULTURAL POLITICS (3) SEM. 3. Traditional and revisionist approaches to the study of the political uses of culture in 19th and 20th century Europe.

HIST 7450 SEMINAR IN THE FRENCH REVOLUTION (3) SEM. 3. Historiography in the French Revolution's origins and legacy.

HIST 7460 SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN BRITAIN (3) SEM. 3. Main themes and events of British history between 1603 and the 1760s.

HIST 7470 SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Relations among the European powers 1870-1945.

HIST 7510 INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN HISTORIOGRAPHY OF TECHNOLOGY (3) SEM. 3. Problems and issues in the history of technology; reviews important, literature.

HIST 7520 SEMINAR IN POLITICS AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE SPACE AGE (3) SEM. 3. Political and technological context of the space age.

HIST 7530 SEMINAR IN SOUTHERN INDUSTRIALIZATION (3) SEM. 3. Significant scholarly works and primary sources dealing with the history of industrialization and technology in the American South.

HIST 7540 SEMINAR IN AEROSPACE HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Central problems, issues, and literature in aerospace history.

HIST 7550 SEMINAR IN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY (3) SEM. 3. Exploration of the interactions between science and politics in the 20th century.

HIST 7560 SEMINAR IN THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION (3) SEM. 3. Central questions and historiography relating to the Industrial Revolution.

HIST 7570 TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Literature in the history of technology from a social and cultural perspective.

HIST 7630 SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Research tools, major issues, and sources in Latin American history.

HIST 7690 SEMINAR IN MODERN WORLD HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Examination of world historiography and theory, with topical readings on comparative themes such as imperialism and colonialism, catch-up industrialization, decolonization, the Atlantic world, gender systems, religious diasporas, trade, and exploration.

HIST 7700 SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL METHODS (3) SEM. 3. Methodology and theory of historical research. Preparation of a significant original research paper.

HIST 7710 GRADUATE RESEARCH AND WRITING SEMINAR (3) SEM. 3. Pr. HIST 7700. A writing-intensive course designed to sharpen graduate students' research and writing skills.

HIST 7720 SEMINAR IN ARCHIVAL THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) SEM. 3. Pr. HIST 5710 or HIST 6710. Development of archival theory in the major functional areas of archival practice, including appraisal, acquisition, description, preservation, reference and access, outreach, and advocacy.

HIST 7730 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF RECORDS AND ARCHIVES (3) SEM. 3. Pr. HIST 5710 or HIST 6710. Origins, organization, and development of records, record keeping systems, and archival institutions in Europe and North America.

HIST 7740 MANAGEMENT OF ARCHIVES AND RELATED ORGANIZATIONS (3) SEM. 3. Pr. HIST 5710 or HIST 6710. Theory and practice of management in archives, libraries, museums, special collections and related organizations.

HIST 7750 ADVANCED APPRAISAL OF ARCHIVAL MATERIALS (3) SEM. 3. Pr. HIST 5710 or HIST 6710. Only graduate students in History, or Archival Studies or Public History Graduate Certificate programs. Theory and practice in the selection and appraisal of materials in archives, libraries, museums, special collections and related organizations.

HIST 7760 DEVELOPING DIGITAL ARCHIVES (3) SEM. 3. Pr. HIST 5710 or HIST 6710. Only graduate students in History or Archival Studies Certificate program. Theory and practice of developing digital collections in archives, libraries, museums, special collections and related organizations.

HIST 7770 ISSUES IN ARCHIVAL STUDIES (3) SEM. 3. Pr. HIST 5710 or HIST 6710. Special topics in archival studies offered in conjunction with member institutions of the Archival Education Collaborative. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

HIST 7800 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1865 (3) SEM. 3. Research and writing of an original paper based on primary sources. Paper should be of publishable or near publishable quality. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7810 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1865 (3) SEM. 3. Research and writing of an original paper based on primary sources. Paper should be of publishable or near publishable quality. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7820 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Research and writing of an original paper based on primary sources. Paper should be of publishable or near-publishable quality. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7830 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Research and writing of an original paper based on primary sources. Paper should be of publishable or near-publishable quality. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7840 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY (3) SEM. 3. Research and writing of an original paper based on primary sources. Paper that should be of publishable or near-publishable quality. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7850 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Research and writing of an original paper based on primary sources, Paper should be of publishable or near-publishable quality. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7910 PUBLIC HISTORY INTERNSHIP (3) PRA. 3. Pr. HIST 6810 and P/C HIST 7700. Application of principles of public history practice within a functioning venue or site under supervision of public historian; final written report required. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7920 ARCHIVAL INTERNSHIP (1-6) INT. Pr. HIST 6710 or Departmental approval. Application of the principles of archival practice within the context of a functioning archival repository under the supervision of professional archivists. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

HIST 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-10) MST. Research and writing of the MA thesis. Course may be repeated with change in topic.

HIST 8000 READING COURSE IN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877 (3) PRL. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Selected topics in American history to 1877. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 8010 READING COURSE IN AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1877 (3) PRL. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Selected topics in American history since 1877 Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 8300 READING COURSE IN EUROPEAN HISTORY TO 1815 (3) PRL. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Selected topics in European history to 1815. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 8310 READING COURSE IN EUROPEAN HISTORY SINCE 1815 (3) PRL. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Selected topics in European history since 1815. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 8500 READING COURSE IN THE HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY (3) PRL. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Selected topics in the history of technology. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 8600 READING COURSE IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3) PRL. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Selected topics in Latin American history. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST 8610 READING COURSE IN WORLD HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr., Departmental approval. Directed readings in modern world history, focusing on one or two geographic areas or themes.

HIST 8700 HISTORIOGRAPHY AND THEORY OF HISTORY (3) SEM. 3. Exploration of the nature of history by tracing changing conceptions of historical thought and practice from their origins to the present.

HIST 8710 INTRODUCTION TO THE TEACHING OF HISTORY (1) SEM. 1. SU. Introduction to some of the challenges involved in teaching history at the college level.

HIST 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-10) DSR. Research and writing of the PhD dissertation. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Journalism Courses

JRNL 1100 JOURNALISM FUNDAMENTALS (3) LEC. 3. Emphasis on Associated Press Stylebook, word usage, and spelling for students interested in print, broadcast, public relations, and web-based writing.

JRNL 1AA0 JOURNALISM FUNDAMENTALS ENTRANCE EXAM (0) LAB. 1.5. SU. JRNL 1AA0 is an exam option for students who are required to take JRNL 1100. The course will test students on spelling, grammar, Associated Press Style and word usage to mirror content covered in the in-person course.

JRNL 2210 NEWSWRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0. With a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100. Introduction to newswriting techniques, with emphasis on learning news values, recognizing parts of a story, and writing stories that meet standards of accuracy, grammar, style, spelling, law, and ethics.

JRNL 2310 REPORTING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210. With a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100. Preparation for careers in gathering and telling the news. Course emphasizes the writing of accurate, clear, and meaningful news stories for print and digital formats.

JRNL 2320 ADVISING STUDENT PUBLICATIONS (3) LEC. 3. Primarily for non-journalism and non-communication majors. Role and responsibilities of the publication adviser in high school and college.

JRNL 3010 DIGITAL NEWS PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0. with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Introduction to the basics of digital video production. Emphasis on techniques used in producing newscasts for broadcast, web and mobile devices.

JRNL 3020 DIGITAL NEWS REPORTING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 and JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 3010 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Writing and reporting digital news stories on deadline for broadcast, online, social media, and mobile outlets.

JRNL 3103 GLOBAL JOURNALISM AND MEDIA SYSTEMS (3) DSL. 3. The Internet and social media have created a world more connected than ever. Examines the economic, political, technological, and cultural changes that impact media and journalism globally.

JRNL 3110 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED JOURNALISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210 and JRNL 2310 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIV or MDIA. Introduction to how a media organization operates; provides an opportunity for students to gain practical, hands-on journalism experience.

JRNL 3220 MAGAZINE AND FEATURE WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and JRNL 2210. with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Introduction to writing colorful, human-interest non-fiction pieces that illustrate drama and impact. Students will learn how to pitch their ideas to editors in print and digital markets.

JRNL 3410 PHOTOJOURNALISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and JRNL 2210. with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Uses, techniques, and processes of digital photography for the newspaper, magazine, and web-based industries. Operations of digital SLRs and Photoshop and techniques for variety of assignments are addressed.

JRNL 3470 EDITING AND DESIGN (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Introduction to the basics of design, layout, headline writing, typography, use of color, and selection of images for visual impact. Students will learn how to design news, sports, and magazine layouts, using Adobe InDesign and Photoshop.

JRNL 3510 MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and JRNL 2210. with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Introduction to multimedia journalistic storytelling. Reporting and production course where students use various technologies to produce journalism stories for digital platforms.

JRNL 3530 SPORTS REPORTING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210 or (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Sports reporting for print, broadcast, and online media, with emphasis on interviewing athletes, covering sporting events, and learning about issues surrounding sports.

JRNL 4230 ADVANCED REPORTING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210 and JRNL 2310 and (JRNL 3220 and JRNL 3020) or (JRNL 3220 and JRNL 3530) or (JRNL 3020 or JRNL 3530). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Developing and writing news stories under deadline pressure; investigative and interpretative reporting.

JRNL 4320 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNALISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. or Departmental approval. Emphasis on content, advertising, audience, and marketing in news organizations and applying entrepreneurial principles to journalism start-ups.

JRNL 4410 JOURNALISM HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Issues facing the American press, from colonial times to the present, with emphasis on regional and state issues.

JRNL 4417 HONORS JOURNALISM HISTORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Issues facing the American press, from colonial times to the present, with emphasis on regional and state issues. Credit will not be given for both JRNL 4410 and JRNL 4417.

JRNL 4470 ADVANCED MAGAZINE AND FEATURE WRITING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210 and JRNL 2310 and JRNL 3220 and (JRNL 3020 or JRNL 3530). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Emphasis on creating long-form, non-fiction articles for print and digital publications through graceful and innovative writing techniques and skillful reporting.

JRNL 4480 ADVANCED PUBLICATION DESIGN (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103 and JRNL 2210 and JRNL 3470. with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, MDIV or Departmental approval. Desktop publishing to produce print publications, including brochures and newsletters, and with exposure to web page, advertising, and magazine design.

JRNL 4490 LITERARY JOURNALISM (3) LEC. 3. Survey course on the best non-fiction produced by journalists.

JRNL 4870 COMMUNITY JOURNALISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210 and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100. Civic role of community journalists.

JRNL 4920 JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP (3) INT. Pr. (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103) and JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210 and JRNL 2310 and (JRNL 3020 or JRNL 3220 or JRNL 3530) and (JRNL 3010 or JRNL 3110 or JRNL 3410 or JRNL 3470 or JRNL 3510). with a minimum grade of "B" in JRNL 1100 and one specialized reporting course and one journalism production course and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA, or MDIV. Opportunity to apply classroom experience to career setting. Internship must be a supervised, closely monitored work experience, appropriate to the major, that takes place in a professional setting. Admission to internship program.

JRNL 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-4) IND. Research and analysis of specific areas of journalism. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

JRNL 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College or departmental approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

JRNL 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN JOURNALISM (3) AAB. 3. Pr. JRNL 1100 or JRNL 1AA0 and JRNL 2210. with a minimum grade of B in JRNL 1100 and Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, PRCM, MDIA or MDIV. Study of narrowly defined journalism topics not already covered in the current JRNL curriculum. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

JRNL 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. 3. Pr. Honors College or departmental approval.

Liberal Arts, General Courses

LBAR 1010 ORIENTATION TO LIBERAL ARTS (1) LEC. 1. SU. This course is designed to help students who are currently undeclared liberal arts students explore the various majors and opportunities the College of Liberal Arts provides.

LBAR 2010 LIBERAL ARTS CAREERS PREPARATION (2) LEC. 2. This course helps Liberal Arts majors to identify their strengths and talents as liberal arts students, to seek appropriate educational and extracurricular experiences, and to plan for a successful transition from college to career.

LBAR 3910 PRACTICUM IN LIBERAL ARTS (1-3) AAB. Focused civic engagement or study abroad experiences designed to develop leadership, social responsibility, and cross-cultural awareness. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Media Studies Courses

MDIA 2350/2353 INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Introduction to film analysis, modes of film practice and critical approaches to the study of cinema. May count either MDIA 2350/MDIA 2353 or RTVF 2350/RTVF 2353.

MDIA 2420 INTRODUCTION TO FILMMAKING (3) STU. 3. Developing technical and conceptual skills to communicate through digital film. May count either MDIA 2420 or RTVF 2420.

MDIA 2700 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL MEDIA (3) STU. 3. Introduction to basic visual media production with emphasis on visual principles, terminology and compositional structure for various media types. May count either MDIA 2700 or RTVF 2700.

MDIA 2800 MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to basic multimedia production, with emphasis on radio and web-based audio/visual production. May count either MDIA 2800 or MDIA 2420 and MDIA 2800 or RTVF 2800.

MDIA 3100 INTERMEDIATE FILMMAKING (3) STU. 3. Pr. MDIA 2420 or MDIA 2700 or RTVF 2420 or RTVF 2700 or RTVF 2703. Further develops conceptual and technical filmmaking skills. May count either MDIA 3100 or RTVF 3100.

MDIA 3210 SOUNDTRACKS, MUSIC AND MASS MEDIA (3) LEC. 3. Historical, artistic and economic contexts of music and the mass media. May count either MDIA 3210 or RTVF 3210.

MDIA 3300/3303 FOUNDATION OF MASS COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. Historical and theoretical bases of mass communication in the U. S., emphasizing social, cultural, regulatory and economic aspects. May count either MDIA 3300/MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300/RTVF 3303.

MDIA 3350 WRITING FOR TELEVISION AND FILM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. The study, practice, and development of writing skills and techniques for radio, television, and film, including commercials, features, PSAs, and dramatic scripts. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 3350 or MDIA 3380 and MDIA 3350 or RTVF 3350.

MDIA 3580 REPRODUCING POPULAR CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Postmodern study on the widespread recycling of media artifacts. May count either MDIA 3580 or RTVF 3580.

MDIA 3820 SEQUENCE DESIGN (3) STU. 3. Pr. (MDIA 2420 or RTVF 2420 or RTVF 2700 or RTVF 2703) and MDIA 2700. Conceptual understanding, development and use of images and text for time based media. May count either MDIA 3820 or RTVF 3820.

MDIA 3970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) AAB. 3. Special topics concentration on production, distribution, and exhibition of mass communication. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

MDIA 4200 HISTORY OF AMERICAN BROADCASTING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303 or CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. The social, economic and technological evolution of radio and television in the United States. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4200 or RTVF 4200.

MDIA 4210 POPULAR CULTURE AND MASS MEDIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Examines myths, icons, rituals, heroes, celebrities, genres, narratives, stereotypes as experienced and presented within communication processes. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4210 or RTVF 4210.

MDIA 4220 WOMEN AND MASS MEDIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Analysis of the relationship between media messages of women and sociocultural definitions of women. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4220 or RTVF 4220.

MDIA 4260 MEDIA AND REALITY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303 or PRCM 3040 or PRCM 3043) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Analysis of the representation of "reality" in the mass media. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA , MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4260 or RTVF 4260.

MDIA 4280 DIVERSITY ISSUES AND THE MASS MEDIA (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Analysis of the relationship between media messages of minorities and socio-cultural definitions of minorities. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4280 or RTVF 4280.

MDIA 4300 BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AND CRITICISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Introduces critical, theoretical, and organizational concepts, strategies, processes, and frameworks for programming for mass media systems. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM.

MDIA 4310 MEDIA AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Examination of the relationship between the mass communication industry and a mass society. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM.

MDIA 4320 BROADCAST MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Investigates principles and practices of managing broadcast stations and cable operations. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4320 or RTVF 4320.

MDIA 4340/4343 MEDIA AND FAMILY (3) LEC. 3. Examination of the relationship between television and the American Family. May count either MDIA 4340 or RTVF 4340.

MDIA 4360 HISTORY OF INTERNATIONAL CINEMA (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). History of International Cinema including national cinemas, film movements, directors, and style. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4360 or RTVF 4360.

MDIA 4370 MEDIA AND RELIGION (3) LEC. 3. Representations and influences of religions in the mass media. May count either MDIA 4370 or RTVF 4370.

MDIA 4380/4383 HISTORY OF AMERICAN FILM INDUSTRY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). History of the film industry and its relationship to U.S. society. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4380/4383 or RTVF 4380/4383.

MDIA 4390/4393 FILM AUTHORS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 1. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). In-depth study of one or more filmmakers important to the development of film as a popular art form. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4390 or RTVF 4390.

MDIA 4420 HISTORY OF MEDIA TECHNOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). History of media technology from 18th-21st centuries. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4420 or RTVF 4420.

MDIA 4580 FAME, CELEBRITY, AND MEDIA CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103. Examination of celebrity and fame as distinguishing cultural phenomena. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4580 or RTVF 4580.

MDIA 4600 ADAPTATION FOR THE SHORT FILM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. MDIA 3100 or RTVF 3100 or RTVF 3103 or RTVF 3107. A survey of ways in which film can be adapted from pre-existing sources to create new works that stand on their own. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4600 or RTVF 4600.

MDIA 4800 ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or MDIA 2800 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303 or RTVF 2800 or RTVF 2803. Design and production of advanced multimedia projects. Departmental approval. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4800 or RTVF 4800.

MDIA 4920 INTERNSHIP (3) INT. 3. SU. Opportunity to apply classroom experience to real job setting. Admission to internship program. Declared major in AGCO, MDIA, or MDIV. May count either MDIA 4920 or RTVF 4920.

MDIA 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (3) IND. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Study of narrowly-defined MDIA topic not already covered in the MDIA curriculum and under the direction of an MDIA faculty. May be repeated with a change in topic. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4970 or RTVF 4970. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

MDIA 4940 VISUAL MEDIA PROJECTS (3) STU. 3. Pr. MDIA 3100 or MDIA 3820 or RTVF 3100 or RTVF 3103 or RTVF 3107 or RTVF 3820 or RTVF 3823. Capstone course in which students work as a team on a visual media project under the direction of the instructor and in collaboration with a resident scholar or artist. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4940 or RTVF 4940.

MDIA 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (MDIA 3300 or MDIA 3303 or RTVF 3300 or RTVF 3303) and (CMJN 2100 or CMJN 2103). Study of narrowly-defined RTVF topics not already covered in the current RTVF curriculum. May be repeated with a change in topic. Declared major in AGCO, COMM, JRNL, MDIA, MDIV or PRCM. May count either MDIA 4970 or RTVF 4970. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Music - Applied Courses

MUAP 1110 PERFORMANCE I (1) PRL. 1. Pr., Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the first-year Music Education major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 1210 PERFORMANCE II (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1110. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the first-year Music Education major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 1310 PERFORMANCE I (1) PRL. 1. Pr., Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the Music minor or secondary performance medium for the Music or Music Education major. One half-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 1410 PERFORMANCE II (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1310. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the Music minor or secondary performance medium for the Music or Music Education major. One half-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 1520 PERFORMANCE I (2) PRL. 1. Pr., Successful audition and Departmental approval. Instruction in major performance medium for the first-year BM or BA in Music major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 1530 PERFORMANCE I (1) PRL. 1. Pr., Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the first-year Music Theatre major. Two half-hour private lessons per week.

MUAP 1620 PERFORMANCE II (2) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1520. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the first-year BM or BA in Music major. One hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 1630 PERFORMANCE II (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1530. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the first-year Music Theatre major. Two half-hour private lessons per week.

MUAP 2110 PERFORMANCE III (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1210. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the second-year Music Education major. One-hour private lesson per week

MUAP 2210 PERFORMANCE IV (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 2110. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the second-year Music Education major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 2310 PERFORMANCE III (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1410. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the Music minor or secondary performance medium for the Music or Music Education major. One half-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 2410 PERFORMANCE IV (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 2310. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the Music minor or secondary performance medium for the Music or Music Education major. One half-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 2520 PERFORMANCE III (2) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1620. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the second-year BM or BA in Music major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 2530 PERFORMANCE III (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 1630. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the second-year Music Theatre major. Two half-hour private lessons per week.

MUAP 2620 PERFORMANCE IV (2) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 2520. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the second-year BM or BA in Music major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 2630 PERFORMANCE IV (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 2530. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the second-year Music Theatre major. Two half-hour private lessons per week.

MUAP 3120 PERFORMANCE V (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 2210. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the third-year Music Education major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 3220 PERFORMANCE VI (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 3120. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the third-year Music Education major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 3520 PERFORMANCE V (2) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 2620. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the third-year BM or BA in Music major. One-hour private lesson per week.

MUAP 3530 PERFORMANCE V (1) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 2630. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in major performance medium for the third-year Music Theatre major. Two half-hour private lessons per week.

MUAP 3620 PERFORMANCE VI (2) PRL. 1. Pr. MUAP 3520. and Departmental approval and Successful audition. Instruction in