School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

JANAKI ALAVALAPATI, Dean 

THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES has a long tradition of offering educational programs that prepare graduates for employment in a wide variety of natural resource professions. Natural areas, forests and their associated resources play a unique and increasingly important role in contemporary society. They enhance both economic development and environmental quality. The School’s programs emphasize a comprehensive understanding of interrelationships between the functions and values of diverse renewable natural resources. This awareness is essential to effective management and, ultimately, to meeting society’s needs.

In keeping with the University’s land-grant mission, the School’s goals are to pursue excellence in education, research, and extension (including outreach and public service activities) focused on the forests, wildlife, and associated resources of Alabama and the southeastern United States. With respect to undergraduate education, this focus is on preparing graduates who have the necessary skills for initial employment, with the breadth and depth of educational background to support professional growth and continued career advancement. The result of this directed effort from an energized faculty and administration are motivated graduates who have the foundation to master the art and science of managing wild lands for the betterment of both the local and global communities.

If you would like to speak to someone about the programs in the school of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, please call the Director of Student Services at (334) 844-1050, the Coordinator of Student Recruitment at (334) 844-1094 or send an email to workingwithnature@auburn.edu.

Web Site

Students are encouraged to visit the school’s website (http://www.auburn.edu/sfws) which provides information on the school’s programs and faculty, as well as updates on courses, scheduling, practicum details, and events of interest to School.

Course Prefixes for the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

Course prefixes for courses in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences (SFWS) are FORY (forestry), FOEN (forestry engineering), FOPR (forest products), NATR (Natural Resources), WILD (wildlife) and FOWS (SFWS common courses).

Curricula and Options

The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences offers undergraduate curricula leading to bachelor of science (BS) degrees in forestry, geospatial and environmental informatics, natural resources management, wildlife ecology and management, and a wildlife sciences- pre-veterinary medicine concentration. A forest engineering option is available under the bachelor of biosystems engineering (BSEN) degree program. It is offered in conjunction with the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. Links to more information and the curricula models for each of these majors are found at the bottom of this page.

Students in the SFWS with exceptional academic qualifications should also consider enrollment in the University’s Honors College. This opportunity is described under Special Academic Opportunities in the Academic Polices section of the Bulletin and carries a number of significant benefits to qualified students.

Accreditation

The bachelor’s programs in forestry and the forest engineering option in biosystems engineering (the latter with addition of the forest resources minor) are accredited by the Society of American Foresters (SAF). SAF is the accrediting body recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation as the accrediting agency for forestry education in the United States. Graduation from such SAF-accredited programs is required of all applicants for Registered Forester status in Alabama and several other states. The biosystems engineering program with the forest engineering option is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Completion of the wildlife sciences degree program qualifies the graduates for certification as associate wildlife biologists by The Wildlife Society. Completion of the wildlife pre-vet concentration prepares students for continuing to a college of veterinary medicine or other health-oriented study.

Forest Engineering Option

The Department of Biosystems Engineering in conjunction with the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering and the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences offers an accredited degree in biosystems engineering with a forest engineering option. Graduates are qualified to pursue Professional Engineering (PE) credentials. To receive a Society of American Foresters accredited degree and be eligible to become a registered forester in the state of Alabama, students must complete the forest track in Biosystems Engineering and the forest resources minor in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences.

This program is committed to preparing students for productive professional careers in the forest products industry and related natural resource and environmental systems sectors. Specific educational objectives of the program are: 1) graduates solve engineering problems such as those associated with the environment and natural resources, and the production, processing, storage, manufacture, utilization, and recycling of biological products; 2) graduates develop solutions to problems that combine engineering and biological sciences; 3) graduates develop environmentally and economically feasible and practical design solutions; and 4) graduates expand the role of engineering in society, communicate effectively, practice in a professional and ethical manner, and provide leadership in the profession.

The curriculum is coordinated by the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering and the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences. Students register in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering and are assigned academic advisors in Biosystems Engineering and in Forestry. Beginning students should apply to the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering and complete the Pre-Forestry Engineering, program. (See the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering, Department of Biosystems Engineering section for the curriculum model, and detailed admission and degree requirements.)

Military Science

In all curricula within the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, electives may include any number of Basic ROTC or Advanced ROTC. In curricula which do not provide sufficient electives for this purpose, ROTC may be taken in lieu of required courses outside of the major and not in the university core, to be selected with the approval of a School advisor. Common courses selected are Natural Resource Electives in the Wildlife curriculum, and forestry restricted electives.

Admission Requirements and Academic Standards

General Requirements

Freshman eligibility for the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences is determined by Enrollment Services. They may be reached at their website or by phone at (334) 844-6425. However, since the requirements for forestry and wildlife education necessitate high school preparatory work of high intellectual quality and considerable breadth, the following program is recommended: English (4 units), mathematics (including algebra, geometry, trigonometry and analytic geometry) (4 units), chemistry (1 unit), biology (1 unit), physics (1 unit), history, literature or social science (2 or 3 units), and foreign languages (1 unit). Freshmen in Forestry are admitted to the Pre-Forestry (PFOR) curriculum. Wildlife Ecology and Management students are admitted directly into the Wildlife Ecology and Management curricula (WLDE) and Natural Resources Management students are admitted directly into the Natural Resources Management curricula (NATR) and Geospatial and Environmental Informatics students are admitted directly into the Geospatial and Environmental curricula (GSEI).

Transfers from other institutions must apply through Enrollment Services. The exact placement of transfer students can be determined only upon review of their transcripts by the Registrar’s Office and the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences.

Credit toward a degree in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences will not be allowed for mathematics or chemistry courses at a lower level than those specified in the curriculum for the degree sought. Students who are not prepared to take the courses prescribed should take lower level remedial courses without degree credit.

Transfer Credits

Transfer credit for forestry and wildlife courses not considered equivalent to those required in the chosen curriculum may be substituted for elective credit. However, duplication of credit will not be allowed. Equivalency of forestry and wildlife courses will be determined by the Dean’s Office. Students also may obtain credit for FORY, FOWS, GSEI and WILD courses on the basis of validating examinations. Arrangements for validating examinations must be made with the Dean’s Office. Transfer credit for upper-division courses in the major (greater than or equal to 3000-level) generally are not accepted for substitution.

Forestry Specific Requirements

The Professional Curriculum in Forestry (FORB) begins with the courses in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Summer Field Practicum as detailed in the major link at the bottom of this page. Students are admitted to this curriculum once a year during spring semester. To be considered for admission, a student must have completed, or be enrolled in all required courses in mathematics, statistics, biology, and English in the Pre-Forestry curriculum (PFOR).

To remain enrolled in the professional Forestry curriculum, students must maintain minimum GPA standards established by Auburn University. Students also must complete designated courses in the major with at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA. These major courses are designated in the curriculum model in the link at the bottom of this page.

Students in the FORY curriculum must attend the Forestry Practicum, which is scheduled for the summer term preceding the junior year and is held at the Solon Dixon Forestry Education Center near Andalusia, Alabama. Prerequisite classes needed to qualify to attend are ENGL 1100 and ENGL 1120, BIOL 1020 & 1030, MATH 1130 or higher, STATS 2510. 

Forest Engineering Option Specific Requirements

Students are admitted to the professional Biosystems Engineering with Forest Engineering Option curriculum (FOEN) upon successful completion of the Pre-Forest Engineering (PFOE) program in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. Additional details on the Forest Engineering Option are available on the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering Biosystem page. Students pursuing the Forest Engineering Option must meet School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences requirements for admission to the Forestry Summer Field Practicum, and must attend the Forestry Practicum. This summer hands-on experience is scheduled for the summer term preceding the junior year and is held at the Solon Dixon Forestry Education Center near Andalusia, Alabama.

Geospatial and Environmental Informatics Specific Requirements

Geospatial and Environmental Informatics curricula (GSEI) are the same as for other SFWS majors and are set to match the requirements of Auburn University for any given year. To remain enrolled in the GSEI curriculum, students must maintain minimum GPA standards established by Auburn University. In addition to these standards, all required Geospatial and Environmental Informatics courses in the major with the prefix of FORY, FOWS and GSEI listed in bold must be completed with a grade of C or better. Grades lower than a C will not satisfy prerequisite requirements of successive listed courses and the course must be re-taken for credit toward the degree. Students also must complete designated courses in the major with at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA

Natural Resources Management Specific Requirements

Admission requirements for the Natural Resources Management curricula (NATR) are the same as for other SFWS majors and are set to match the requirements of Auburn University for any given year.

Students in the NATR curriculum must have a sequence of courses and selected embedded minor approved by their faculty advisor. This highly flexible curriculum should be customized to include the coursework for individual outdoor careers within the increasingly large number of jobs outside of the traditional forestry and wildlife fields.

To remain enrolled in the Natural Resources Management curriculum, students must maintain minimum GPA standards established by Auburn University. In addition to these standards, all required Natural Resources Management courses in the major with the prefix of FORY, WILD or FOWS listed in the sophomore, junior and senior years must be completed with a grade of C or better. Grades lower than a C will not satisfy prerequisite requirements of successive listed courses and the course must be re-taken for credit toward the degree. Students also must complete designated courses in the major with at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA. These major courses are designated in the curriculum model in the link at the bottom of this page.

Wildlife Specific Requirements

Admission requirements for the Wildlife Ecology and Management curricula (WLDE) are the same as for other SFWS majors and are set to match the requirements of Auburn University for any given year.

Students in the WILD curriculum, as described by the model in the link below, must attend WILD 4910 Wildlife Summer Practicum, which is scheduled for the summer term preceding the senior year and is held at the Solon Dixon Forestry Education Center near Andalusia, Alabama in the south-central section of the state.  To be considered for admission to practicum, students must complete all prerequisites including: WILD 3280, BIOL 3060, WILD 5400 and WILD 3750.

To remain enrolled in Wildlife Ecology and Management or the Wildlife Science, Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration curricula, students must maintain minimum GPA standards established by Auburn University. In addition to these standards, all required wildlife courses in Wildlife Ecology and Management (WILD and FOWS) listed in the sophomore, junior and senior years and all required wildlife courses in Wildlife Science, Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration (WILD) must be completed with a grade of C or better. Grades lower than a C will not satisfy prerequisite requirements of successive listed courses and the course must be re-taken for credit toward the degree. Students also must complete designated courses in the major with at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA. These major courses are designated in the curriculum model in the link at the bottom of this page.

Earth System Science Courses

ESSI 8000 EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE AND GLOBAL CHANGE (3) LEC. 3. The course explores the Earth system as a whole, with an emphasis on the interrelationships between geological, biological, climatological, and human systems on regional and global scales.

ESSI 8100 EARTH SYSTEM OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. GSEI 1200 and GSEI 2070. Course reviews recent advances in earth system observations and provides students opportunity to develop holistic understanding of key parameters and processes of the earth system including biosphere, atmosphere, and oceans processes using observations.

Forest Engineering Courses

FOEN 3000 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY OPERATIONS (1) LEC. 3, FLD/LEC. 32. Pr. FORY 3050 and FOPR 3390. Introduction to basic field operations in Forestry including site preparation and planting, harvesting and primary manufacturing processes relative to specific geographic locations. Four-day continuous field trip prior to spring or fall semester.

FOEN 3040 FOREST SURVEYING (2) PRA. 2. Basic land surveying concepts and procedures as applied to Forestry. Use of basic surveying instruments and calculations for land areas, boundaries, and topographic features. Summer.

FOEN 4730 APPLICATION OF TIMBER HARVESTING TECHNIQUES (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Pr. FOEN 5700. Business considerations including safety, regulations, contracts, deeds and cost accounting and analysis combined with equipment operation and maintenance. Fall.

FOEN 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Faculty supervision of individual student investigations of specialized problems in forest engineering. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FOEN 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Topics of an undergraduate nature pertinent to Forest Engineering. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FOEN 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Individual or small group study of a specialized area in forest engineering. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

FOEN 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-6) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Directed research and Honors Thesis. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FOEN 5230 ENGINEERED WOOD STRUCTURE DESIGN (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. ENGR 2070. Load, deflection criteria; engineering characteristics of wood; designing wood components and mechanical connections; shear walls and diaphragms; trusses; bridges; post-frame construction. Fall.

FOEN 5700 HARVESTING (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3180. Analysis of the administration of timber harvest, equipment choice, planning methods, movement of timber products, machine and system costs, balancing of harvesting systems, logging safety, and environmental impact. Spring.

FOEN 5710 TIMBER HARVESTING ANALYSIS METHODS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FOEN 3040. Analysis methods for timber harvesting productivity and costs including gathering of time and production data, preparation of data for analysis and statistical modeling. Spring.

FOEN 6230 ENGINEERED WOOD STRUCTURE DESIGN (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. ENGR 2070. Load, deflection criteria; engineering characteristics of wood; designing wood components and mechanical connections; shear walls and diaphragms; trusses; bridges; post-frame construction. Fall.

FOEN 6700 HARVESTING (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3180. Analysis of the administration of timber harvest, equipment choice, planning methods, movement of timber products, machine and system costs, balancing of harvesting systems, logging safety, and environmental impact. Spring.

FOEN 6710 TIMBER HARVESTING ANALYSIS METHODS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FOEN 3000. Analysis methods for timber harvesting productivity and costs including gathering of time and production data, preparation of data for analysis and statistical modeling. Spring.

FOEN 7930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Faculty supervision of individual student investigations of advanced specialized problems in forest engineering. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FOEN 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) LEC. Departmental approval. Individual or small group study of an advanced specialized area in forest engineering. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Forest Products Courses

FOPR 3390 INTRODUCTION TO WOOD SCIENCE AND FOREST PRODUCTS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3020. The basic properties of wood and their impact on the manufacture of forest products. Identification of important products and woods. Fall.

FOPR 4930 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Study of timely topics in forest products on an as needed or as available basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FOPR 5050 BIOMASS PROCESSING CHEMISTRY AND BIOENERGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. CHEM 2070 or CHEM 2077. Departmental approval. Wood and fiber morphology, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin chemistry; biodegradtions of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Emphasis on bioenergy and bio-products.

FOPR 5250 BIOCOMPOSITES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FOPR 3390. Departmental approval. Relationships between various biomass feedstock properties and the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of the biocomposite from various manufacturing processes.

FOPR 6050 BIOMASS PROCESSING CHEMISTRY AND BIOENERGY (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Wood and fiber morphology, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin chemistry; biodegradtions of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Emphasis on bioenergy and bio-products.

FOPR 6250 BIOCOMPOSITES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FOPR 3390. Departmental approval. Relationships between various biomass feedstock properties and the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of the biocomposite from various manufacturing processes.

FOPR 7030 PHYSICS OF WOOD AND WOOD COMPOSITES (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Hygrothermophysics, dimensional stability, acoustics, piezoelectric properties and defectoscopy of wood and its composites. Fall.

FOPR 7040 MECHANICS OF WOOD AND WOOD COMPOSITES (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Micro- and macro-mechanical behavior of wood and its composites. Mechanical behavior of glue joints. Modeling engineering performance of wood and its composites. Fall.

FOPR 7060 ADVANCED FOREST PRODUCTS PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FOPR 5350 or FOPR 6350. Analysis of production/operations management problem situations in wood products manufacturing through systems approach and quantitative modeling techniques. Spring.

FOPR 7930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Study of timely topics in forest products on an as needed or as available basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FOPR 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) IND. Departmental approval. Analysis of a problem in forest products or wood science involving library research, laboratory or field work and a report on the findings. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

FOPR 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-15) MST. Credit to be arranged. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

FOPR 8930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. Study of timely topics in forest products on an as needed or as available basis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FOPR 8970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) IND. Departmental approval. Analysis of a problem in forest products or wood science involving library research, laboratory or field work and a report on the findings. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

FOPR 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-15) DSR. Credit to be arranged. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

Forestry & Wildlife Sci. Courses

FOWS 1010 INTRODUCTION TO RENEWABLE NATURAL RESOURCES (1) LEC. 1. Introduction to the wealth and breadth of renewable natural resources in the state, region, nation, and world. Speakers cover topics in forestry, wildlife, water, and soil. Fall, Spring.

FOWS 2010 ENVIRONMENTAL INTERPRETATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr., NATR major/ Nature-based Recreation minor or Departmental approval. Communication theory as management and public relations tool for natural resource management. Fall.

FOWS 2033 INTRO TO ENVIRON EDUCATION (3) LEC. 3. Students will learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of environmental education while participating in experiential learning exercises.

FOWS 2060 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTED LANDSCAPES (2) LEC. 2. Pr. BIOL 1020 or BIOL 1027. This course will serve as an introduction to forest tree biology, forest types of North America, forest ecology and tree identification. The overall course objective is to introduce students to important concepts in forest ecosystem science and management.

FOWS 3015 INTERNATIONAL ISSUES IN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3) FLD. 3. Examination of contemporary natural and cultural resource management practices and conservation programs through national and international program placements. Spring, Summer and Fall.

FOWS 3025 INTERNATIONAL ISSUES IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) FLD. 3. Examination of contemporary natural and cultural resource management practices and conservation programs through national and international program placements. Spring, Summer and Fall.

FOWS 3310 NATURE BASED RECREATION (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to fundamentals of nature-based recreation; recreationist’ motivations, society benefits, and management of the outdoor recreational environment. Spring.

FOWS 3950 UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR (1) LEC. 1. Students will practice speaking in front of a scientific audience, learn to research topics, and organize presentations for professional audiences, faculty, and other students.

FOWS 4310 ECOTOURISM (3) LEC. 3. Principles, business considerations, and issues surrounding ecotourism, with emphasis on critique and connections to other industries. Spring.

FOWS 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) LEC. Overview of forest soil composition, formation, biota, classification, chemistry, ecology, and sustainable management. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

FOWS 4980 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) IND. Departmental approval. Directed research in the area of specialty under faculty supervision. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FOWS 5050 URBAN ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Examination of urban ecosystems and the influence of urbanization on rural and forested lands. Junior standing. Fall. May count either FOWS 5050 or FOWS 6050.

FOWS 5140 WATERSHED SERVICES (2) LEC. 2. This class examines the livelihoods and ecological impacts of Costa Rica's program of payments for watershed services. Travel required. Senior. Fall. May count either FOWS 5140 or FOWS 6140.

FOWS 5220 LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060 or FORY 4230. Ecological effects and management of heterogeneous spatial pattern on ecosystems over large areas. Spring Even Years. May count either FOWS 5220 or FOWS 6220.

FOWS 5270 NATURAL RESOURCE POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Examination of attitudes, philosophies and policies that govern management of the natural resource. Spring.

FOWS 5320 ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES (3) LEC. 3. Environmental services provided by ecosystems, with emphasis on human well-being and livelihood, and emerging market mechanisms. Spring.

FOWS 5453 CONFLICT AND COLLABORATION IN NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3) DSL. 45. Overview of issues, theories, and approaches to conflict management and collaboration in natural resources. Topics include conflict management, collaborative processes, and negotiation; tools and frameworks for analyzing conflict; and evolving management approaches to natural resource conflict.

FOWS 5620 NATURAL RESOURCE FINANCE AND INVESTMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. (ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027). Principles of corporate and real estate finance as applied to natural resources and the place of natural resources in individual and institutional portfolios. May count one of: FORY 6620, FOWS 5620, FOWS 6620.

FOWS 5880 ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Foundations, principles and empirical application of ecological economics to address current social and economic issues. Spring.

FOWS 6140 WATERSHED SERVICES (2) LEC. 2. This class examines the livelihoods and ecological impacts of Costa Rica's program of payments for watershed services. Travel required. Graduate Standing. Fall. May count either FOWS 5140 or FOWS 6140.

FOWS 6220 LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Ecological effects and management of heterogeneous spatial pattern on ecosystems over large areas. Spring Even Years. May count either FOWS 5220 or FOWS 6220.

FOWS 6270 NATURAL RESOURCE POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Examination of attitudes, philosophies and policies that govern management of the natural resource.

FOWS 6320 ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES (3) LEC. 3. Environmental services provided by ecosystems, with emphasis on human well-being and livelihood, and emerging market mechanisms. Spring.

FOWS 6456 CONFLICT AND COLLABORATION IN NATURAL RESOURCES (3) DSL. 45. Overview of issues, theories, and approaches to conflict management and collaboration in natural resources. Topics include conflict management, collaborative processes, and negotiation; tools and frameworks for analyzing conflict; and evolving management approaches to natural resource conflict.

FOWS 6620 NATURAL RESOURCE FINANCE AND INVESTMENT (3) LEC. 3. Principles of corporate and real estate finance as applied to natural resources and the place of natural resources in individual and institutional portfolios. Spring. May count either FORY 5620 or FORY 6620.

FOWS 7150 SPATIAL STATISTICS FOR NATURAL RESOURCES (3) LEC. 3. LAB. 1. Pr. STAT 7020. And any GIS class (or consent of instructor). Applications of spatial statistics in the natural resources. Three types of spatial data including point pattern data, geostatistical data and lattice (areal) data will be covered to introduce basic concepts, theories and methodology of spatial (spatial-tempo) data analyses and modeling.

FOWS 7216 RESTORATION ECOLOGY (3) DSL. 3. Overview of the history, science, ethics, and current practice of restoration ecology to recognize and understand the need for restoration.

FOWS 7226 FOREST HISTORY OF ALABAMA AND THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES (3) DSL. 3. This course will focus on the natural, human and societal factors that influenced forests and land management in the southeastern United States from the 1700s to present. FOWS 7220 or FOWS 7226.

FOWS 7236 FOREST STAND DYNAMICS (3) DSL. 3. Forest stand dynamics studies the changes in stand structure over time. Examines phases of stand development and how we can help and aid forest, wildlife and restoration management decisions.

FOWS 7246 FIRE ECOLOGY (3) DSL. 3. Examines history of fire management, fire behavior, fuel management and models, ignition techniques, fire suppression techniques, urban interface, smoke management, fire weather, elements of a prescribed burn plan, fire and wildlife, and outreach.

FOWS 7256 LONGLEAF PINE ECOLOGY, MANAGEMENT, AND RESTORATION (3) DSL. 3. Covers the ecology of the once-dominant species, the role fire played in maintaining these ecosystems, management possibilities, conversion to longleaf pine, and an overview of the current restoration efforts.

FOWS 7480 ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FORY 5400 or FORY 6400. Policy process and players, theory and evolution of property rights, public choice theory, land ethics, policy analysis, programs and statutory laws, forest policy in an international context. Spring odd years.

FOWS 7950 GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. SU. Students develop ability and confidence in making oral presentations based upon research and provide constructive criticism of their peers' presentations.

Forestry Courses

FORY 3010 FOREST SOILS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. CHEM 1020. Overview of forest soil composition, formation, biota, classification, chemistry, ecology, and management.

FORY 3020 FOREST BIOLOGY (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Field exposure to important principles of forest biology and some examples of their applications to forest resources; dentification of major tree species and critical analysis of forest stand structure. Summer.

FORY 3050 FIELD MENSURATION (4) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Basic concepts and procedures for measuring trees, stands and other forest resources; units of measure, log rules, volume tables, condition class mapping and timber estimation. Summer.

FORY 3060 INTRODUCTION TO FOREST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES (1) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Biological, social, and economic principles underlying forest management strategies, the diversity of forestry enterprises, and the complexities facing forest managers. Summer.

FORY 3100 DENDROLOGY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. (BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037) or FORY 3020. or higher. Taxonomy and identification of important forest trees of the U.S., including cover types of forest regions. Fall.

FORY 3180 FOREST MEASUREMENTS I (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3050. Theoretical and empirical estimates of tree and log volumes, tree taper, and yield tables. Sampling design and analysis to estimate current conditions of timber stands.

FORY 3200 FOREST TREE PHYSIOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FORY 3020. Relationship between cultural, environmental and genetic factors that affect metabolism and growth of individual trees. Fall.

FORY 3500 FORESTRY FOR SMALL WOODLAND OWNERS (3) LEC. 3. An appreciation of forest trees and the environment, the environmental functions of trees, and the economic potential of a balanced land-use plan. Spring.

FORY 3640 TAXATION OF TIMBER AND OTHER NATURAL RESOURCES (2) LEC. 2. Income taxation of natural resources, including passive loss rules, depletion and capital gains, and an introduction to taxation of businesses. Fall.

FORY 4190 FOREST MEASUREMENTS II (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3180. Factors affecting and mathematical principles of tree-volume and stand growth. Spring.

FORY 4230 FOREST ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Forests as functional systems, the biotic and abiotic environment, temporal changes in ecosystem structure and function, application of ecological information. Spring.

FORY 4240 WATERSHED MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030. Introduction to watersheds, effects of land management on erosion and water quality, and mitigation techniques to reduce adverse effects. Spring.

FORY 4260 LONGLEAF PINE: HISTORY, ECOLOGY, MANAGEMENT, AND RESTORATION (2) LEC. 2. History of forestry in the south, focusing on the longleal pine ecosystem. Also, information on species that are part of the longleaf ecosystem, comparisons with other southern pines, and management and restoration techniques.

FORY 4440 FOREST FIRE MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 5. Pr. FORY 4230 or BIOL 3060. The management of fire, both as a tool and wildfire suppression in the management of forested ecosystems. Emphasis placed on experience, technique and administration. Spring.

FORY 4450 FOREST SECTOR ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FORY 5400. Status, trend, employment and other fundamentals of forest industry. Timber supply and demand, forest products supply and demand, technological change, international trade. Spring.

FORY 4500 NATURAL RESOURCES LAW AND ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Economic causes, rationale, and consequences of natural resources. Summer.

FORY 4820 FORESTRY IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR (2) SEM. 4. Pr. FORY 5410. Management systems and practices used in wood purchasing, timber harvesting and timberland management including public relations, forest sustainability, certification and personal business skills. Spring.

FORY 4830 INDUSTRIAL WOOD PROCUREMENT PRACTICUM (1) PRA. 2. SU. Pr. FORY 3050. Strategies, field and office procedures involved in purchasing wood for an industrial forestry firm. Taught as a weekend field exercise at Solon Dixon Forest Education Center. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

FORY 4930 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) AAB/IND. Departmental approval. Fall, Spring, and Summer. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FORY 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Topics of an undergraduate nature pertinent to Forestry. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FORY 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) AAB/LEC. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

FORY 4980 SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT (1-4) LAB. Pr. FORY 5230 and FORY 5410. Integrated study of Forest Resource Management using a case-study approach through development of a comprehensive plan related to the declared emphasis. Spring. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

FORY 4990 SCHOLARS PROJECT (1-3) IND. Departmental approval. A problem in the student's area of interest. To promote independent work, library research, field work, data analysis or other tasks. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

FORY 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-6) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Directed research and writing of honors thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

FORY 5140 FOREST REGENERATION AND SEEDLING PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. P/C FORY 4230 or P/C HORT 3220. Principles of forest nursery seedling culture. Evaluation of activities to improve out planting performance. Plantation establishment problems and practices in Southern US. Spring.

FORY 5150 FOREST HEALTH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FORY 3020 or BIOL 3060. Importance, taxonomy, identification and integrated pest management strategies of principle disease, insect and abiotic disorders of forest and shade trees from seedlings to maturity and forest products. Fall.

FORY 5151 FOREST HEALTH LABORATORY (1) LAB. 1. Coreq. FORY 5150. Identification of basic diseases and insects that affect forest health along with identification of their damage; the processes of pathogen infection and symptomology; and the process of wood decay studied in a laboratory and field environment. Credit will not be given for both FORY 5151 and FORY 6151. Fall.

FORY 5230 SILVICULTURE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 4230 or BIOL 5140 or BIOL 3060 or BSEN 3230. Principles and methods of controlling establishment, growth and quality of forest stands. Application of ecological principles to manipulation of forest ecosystems to meet specific objectives. Fall.

FORY 5250 WETLAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060 or FORY 4230. Wetland ecology in the southeastern U.S. with emphasis on soils, hydrology, biology, and policies and practices related to agriculture, forestry, wildlife. Spring.

FORY 5310 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Critical examination of environmental ethics: historical development and various ethical perspectives. Examination of current environmental issues using perspectives covered in course. Fall.

FORY 5400 FOREST ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3180. Marginal analysis, investment theory, resource supply, economics of conservation, and taxation principles applied to forestry. Structure and performance of forest products markets. Spring.

FORY 5410 FOREST MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 5400 and FORY 4190. Quantitative approaches to decision making in Forestry with an emphasis on the interests of large scale firms and agencies. Fall.

FORY 5440 INTERNATIONAL FORESTRY (3) LEC. 3. Survey global forest location, characteristics, management systems, international forest products trade, current issues, and international forest governance.

FORY 5470 GIS APPLICATIONS IN NATURAL RESOURCES (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Basic understanding of GIS through discussion of the basic components of a GIS and how GIS are used in forestry applications.

FORY 5480 GIS DATABASE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Geographic information system database planning, design, creation, management and analysis using a project oriented approach. Spring.

FORY 5520 CHOICE OF BUSINESS ENTITY (3) LEC. 3. Characteristics of business entities and the criteria to choose between sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations. May count either FORY 5520 or FORY 6520.

FORY 5530 ESTATE PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Probate process; disposition of assets; wills and trusts; the transfer tax system; and strategies to minimize the taxable estate. May count either FORY 5530 or 6530.

FORY 5540/5543 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3) LEC. 3. A review of environmental law including common and administrative law, land use, and Federal statues on water, air, toxins and waste. May count either FORY 5540 or FORY 6540.

FORY 5550/5553 PROPERTY LAW (3) LEC. 3. Land ownership, transfer and management including trespass, nuisance, adverse possession, easements, concurrent ownership, land use regulations and regulatory takings. May count either FORY 4550 or FORY 5550/6550.

FORY 5620 FOREST FINANCE AND INVESTMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ECON 2020 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2027. Principles of corporate and real estate finance as applied to commercial timberland and its place in individual and institutional portfolios. Spring. May count either FORY 5620 or FORY 6620.

FORY 5650 URBAN FORESTRY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3100 or HORT 3220. Principles and concepts of tree establishment, management and health in an urban environment. Case studies of urban forestry programs are presented. Spring.

FORY 6140 FOREST REGENERATION AND SEEDLING PRODUCTION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. P/C FORY 4230 or P/C HORT 3220. Principles of forest nursery seedling culture. Evaluation of activities to improve out planting performance. Plantation establishment problems and practices in Southern US. Spring.

FORY 6150 FOREST HEALTH (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FORY 3020 or BIOL 3060. Importance, taxonomy, identification and integrated pest management strategies of principle disease, insect and abiotic disorders of forest and shade trees from seedlings to maturity and forest products. Fall.

FORY 6151 FOREST HEALTH LABORATORY (1) LAB. 1. Coreq. FORY 6150. Identification of basic diseases and insects that affect forest health along with identification of their damage; the processes of pathogen infection and symptomology; and the process of wood decay studied in a laboratory and field environment. Credit will not be given for both FORY 5151 and FORY 6151.

FORY 6230 SILVICULTURE (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 4230 or BIOL 3060 or BIOL 5140 or BIOL 6140 or BSEN 3230. Principles and methods of controlling establishment, growth and quality of forest stands. Application of ecological principles to manipulation of forest ecosystems to meet specific objectives. Fall.

FORY 6400 FOREST ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3180. Marginal analysis, investment theory, resource supply, economics of conservation, and taxation principles applied to forestry. Structure and performance of forest products markets. Spring.

FORY 6410 FOREST MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. (FORY 5400 or FORY 6400) and FORY 4190. Quantitative approaches to decision making in Forestry with an emphasis on the interests of large scale firms and agencies. Fall.

FORY 6440 INTERNATIONAL FORESTRY (3) LEC. 30. Survey global forest location, characteristics, management systems, international forest products trade, current issues, and international forest governance.

FORY 6470 GIS APPLICATIONS IN NATURAL RESOURCES (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Basic understanding of GIS through discussions of the components of a GIS and how GIS are used in natural resource applications.

FORY 6480 GIS DATABASE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Geographic information system database planning, design, creation, management and analysis using a project oriented approach. Spring.

FORY 6520 CHOICE OF BUSINESS ENTITY (3) LEC. 3. Characteristics of business entities and the criteria to choose between sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations. May count either FORY 5520 or FORY 6520.

FORY 6530 ESTATE PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Probate process; disposition of assets; wills and trusts; the transfer tax system; and strategies to minimize the taxable estate. May count either FORY 5530 or FORY 6530.

FORY 6540 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3) LEC. 3. A review of environmental law including common and administrative law, land use, and Federal statues on water, air, toxins and wastes. May count either FORY 5540 or FORY 6540.

FORY 6550 PROPERTY LAW (3) LEC. 3. Land ownership, transfer and management including trespass, nuisance, adverse possession, easements, concurrent ownership, land use regulations and regulatory takings. May count either FORY 4550 or FORY 5550/6550.

FORY 6650 URBAN FORESTRY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 3100 or HORT 3220. Principles and concepts of tree establishment, management and health in an urban environment. Case studies of urban forestry programs are presented. Spring.

FORY 7110 FOREST BIOGEOCHEMISTRY (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 6230. Fundamental and applied aspects of forest biogeochemical processes at scales of the individual tree, forest community, and forest ecosystem.

FORY 7160 ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO CHEMICAL CLIMATE CHANGE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 4230 and FORY 3200. Plant responses to changes in the chemical climate. Emphasis on sources, effects, methodologies used and ecosystem and global effects. Even years.

FORY 7170 ECOPHYSIOLOGY OF FOREST TREES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3100 or FORY 3200. Interactions among the environment, silvicultural practices, physiological mechanisms and tree growth. Integration of root, shoot and foliar functions and leaf, tree and stand level processes. Spring odd years.

FORY 7210 ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060 or FORY 4230 or BIOL 5140 or BIOL 6140. To create a conceptual model of the terrestrial ecosystem including spatial distributions over time; and the impact of human activity and natural disturbance. Spring.

FORY 7250 ADVANCED ECOSYSTEM MODELING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. FORY 4230 or BIOL 3060. Exploration of the theory and rationale in modeling the structure and functions of ecological ecosystems.

FORY 7326 FOREST GROWTH, SILVICULTURE, AND MANAGEMENT (3) DSL. 3. Understanding of forest growth and yield, measurements, management practices and methods, and optimization techniques necessary to make management decisions that maximize objectives.

FORY 7330 ECOLOGY AND SILVICULTURE OF EASTERN HARDWOOD FORESTS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. FORY 4230. Silvical characteristics of major hardwood species and community composition, dynamics, site relationships, and silviculture of Southern and Eastern deciduous forests, emphasizing oaks. Fall odd years.

FORY 7406 FOREST VALUATION AND ECONOMICS (3) DSL. 3. Forest valuation and the economic theory of forest resource allocation. Topics covered include forest valuation and appraisal, analysis of consumer behavior, production, market structure and the role of government, economics of forest management and policy, international trade, and financial analysis.

FORY 7450 FOREST SECTOR ECONOMICS (4) LEC. 4. Pr. FORY 5400 or FORY 6400. Fundamentals of forest industry, timber supply and demand, forest products supply and demand, technological change, international trade and development, sophisticated forest sector modelling. Spring.

FORY 7460 ADVANCED FOREST ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Evolution of the role of economics in forestry, policy and production analysis methods, non-market valuation, and regional analysis. Spring.

FORY 7510/7516 RESEARCH METHODS (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 3. Overview of the scientific method and its application in forestry/natural resources research. Evaluation and preparation of project proposals with emphasis on research quality and written communication skills. Fall.

FORY 7550 WATERSHED HYDROLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. In depth focus on components of the hydrologic cycle in forested landscapes and how changes in the landscape and management practices impact the hydrologic regime in the watershed. Spring.

FORY 7580 NATURAL RESOURCE POLICY ANALYSIS AND ADMINISTRATION (3) LEC. 3. The policy-making process, the history of natural resource and environmental policy, and applied techniques in policy analysis. Summer.

FORY 7850 URBAN FORESTRY SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. Presentation and discussion of research, scientific papers and issues related to urban forest establishment, care and planning. Credit will not be given for both FORY 7850 and HORT 7850. Fall.

FORY 7910 PRACTICUM IN COLLEGE TEACHING (1) PRA. 1. SU. Techniques and practice of collegiate teaching at the level of Graduate Assistant. Students work under direct supervision and tutelage of the instructor. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

FORY 7930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) AAB/IND. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FORY 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) IND. Departmental approval. Analysis of a problem in Forestry or wood utilization involving library research, laboratory or field work and a report on the findings. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

FORY 7980 MASTER OF NATURAL RESOURCES PAPER (2) IND. In-depth study involving library review, data collection and/or data analysis. Departmental Program.

FORY 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-15) MST. Credit to be arranged.

FORY 8930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

FORY 8970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) IND. Departmental approval. Analysis of a problem in Forestry or wood utilization involving library research, laboratory or field work and report on the findings. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

FORY 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-15) DSR. Credit to be arranged.

Geospatial and Env Informatics Courses

GSEI 1200 DIGITAL EARTH (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Introduction to geospatial technologies, spatial thinking, and job markets in these areas. Exploration of location-based services, global positioning systems, geographic information systems, remote sensing, virtual globes, and web based mapping. Skills and techniques for spatial thinking and environmental analysis.

GSEI 2070 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATICS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. GSEI 1200. Introduction to the environment as a system of linked, interactive components. Application of information science to environmental management. Skills and techniques required for collecting, collating, archiving, modeling, analyzing, visualizing, and communicating information in support of natural resource management.

GSEI 4360 ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. FORY 5470 and FORY 5480 and GSEI 1200. Fundamental concepts, strategies, methods, or techniques of environmental systems modeling and simulation. Models will be constructed using STELLA, an intuitive modeling package that requires little prior experience with computer modeling.

GSEI 4430 APPLICATIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATICS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. GSEI 1200 and FORY 5470. Applications of earth observations to forestry, wildlife, environment and natural resources including water, and and atmosphere.

GSEI 5150 SPATIAL STATISTICS FOR NATURAL RESOURCES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. GSEI 1200 or GSEI 2070 and (STAT 2010 or STAT 2017) or (STAT 2510 or STAT 2513). Applications of spatial statistics in natural resources. Introduction of basic concepts, theories, and methodologies of spatial and spatio-temporal data analyses and modeling. Topics include spatial correlation, spatial interpolation, detection of clusters/hotspots/patterns of interest, and spatial prediction.

GSEI 6150 SPATIAL STATISTICS FOR NATURAL RESOURCES (3) LAB. 3. Applications of spatial statistics in natural resources. Introduction of basic concepts, theories, and methodologies of spatial and spatio-temporal data analyses and modeling. Topics include spatial correlation, spatial interpolation, detection of clusters/hotspots/patterns of interest, and and spatial prediction.

GSEI 7200 LAND PROCESSES AND CLIMATE INTERACTIONS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. This is an advanced graduate level course designed to teach the modeling of land surface processes and study its impact on local, regional and global climate. Students will also perform global/regional climate model simulations using supercomputers.

GSEI 7500 DIGITAL EARTH AND BIG DATA (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. This is an advanced graduate-level course designed to teach the modeling of digital earth and study its impact on local, regional and global climate. Students will also perform global/regional geographic model simulations using supercomputers.

GSEI 7600 CLIMATE MODELING (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Teaches modeling of the Earth’s climate system. Students will also perform global climate model simulations using supercomputers, and analyze climate model outputs using NCAR Command Language.

Natural Resources Management Courses

NATR 2010 ENVIRONMENTAL INTERPRETATION (3) LEC. 3. Pr., NATR major/ Nature-based Recreation minor or departmental approval. Communication theory as management and public relations tool for natural resource management. Fall.

NATR 2020 NATURAL RESOURCES FIELD METHODS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Sampling methods relevant to the evaluation of the environment. Topics include sampling methods, quality assurance procedures, and data management.

NATR 2050 PEOPLE AND THE ENVIRONMENT: AN INTRODUCTION TO CONSERVATION SOCIAL SCIENCES (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to the variety of social sciences used to understand the relationships of people and their environment. Students will develop a deeper and broader understanding of the challenges and potential solutions to natural resource issues facing society today.

NATR 3310 NATURE BASED RECREATION (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to fundamentals of nature-based recreation; recreationist’ motivations, society benefits, and management of the outdoor recreational environment. Spring.

NATR 4240 WATERSHED MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030. Introduction to watersheds, effects of land management on erosion and water quality, and mitigation techniques to reduce adverse effects. Spring

NATR 5050 URBAN ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Examination of urban ecosystems and the influence of urbanization on rural and forested lands. Junior standing. May count either NATR 5050 or NATR 6050.

NATR 5250 WETLAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060 or FORY 4230. Wetland ecology in the southeastern U.S. with emphasis on soils, hydrology, biology, and policies and practices related to agriculture, forestry, wildlife. Spring.

NATR 5310 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Critical examination of environmental ethics: historical development and various ethical perspectives. Examination of current environmental issues using perspectives covered in course. Fall.

NATR 5430 HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF WILDLIFE AND NATURAL RESOURCES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. NATR 2050. Forests, wildlife, wetlands, and wilderness - sustaining and managing our natural resources ultimately depends on understanding people. Students will investigate the paradigms and theoretical foundations regarding our values, beliefs, attitudes and behaviors concerning human-environment interactions.

NATR 5630 CONSERVATION PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Pr. NATR 2050 and BIOL 3060 and (STAT 2510 or STAT 2010). Senior standing or departmental consent. Trains students in how to build plans for conservation and management of natural resources. Covers established processes associated with developing conservation plans while addressing human concerns. Includes how to establish measurable objectives, utilize data, frame problems, and determine uncertainty/risk.

NATR 5880 ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Foundations, principles and empirical application of ecological economics to address current social and economic issues. Spring.

NATR 6050 URBAN ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Examination of urban ecosystems and the influence of urbanization on rural and forested lands. May count either FOWS 5050 or FOWS 6050.

NATR 6250 WETLAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 3060. Wetland ecology in the southeastern U.S. with emphasis on soils, hydrology, biology, and policies and practices related to agriculture, forestry, wildlife. Spring.

NATR 6310 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Critical examination of environmental ethics. Historical development and various ethical perspectives. Examination of current environmental issues using perspectives covered in course. Fall.

NATR 6880 ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Foundations, principles and empirical application of ecological economics to address current social and economic issues. Spring.

Wildlife Sciences Courses

WILD 1100 WILDLIFE FOOD PLOT ESTABLISHMENT (2) LEC. 2. Fundamental concepts, issues, and concerns related to wildlife food plots and practical procedures for establishment of wildlife food plots. Fall.

WILD 2050 WILDLIFE CONSERVATION HISTORY AND LAW (3) LEC. 3. The history of wildlife conservation in North America, the conservation problems that have arisen since European settlement, and the laws and practices that have evolved to remedy them. Fall.

WILD 3280 WILDLIFE ECOLOGY, CONSERVATION, AND MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. BIOL 1030 or BIOL 1037. Fundamentals of wildlife management theory, application, and administration. Fall.

WILD 3750 ANALYSIS FOR WILDLIFE SCIENCES (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. STAT 2010 or STAT 2017 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2513 or STAT 2610 or STAT 3010. Applied training in data analysis tools commonly used in wildlife sciences. Spring.

WILD 3800 INTRODUCTION TO WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT IN SOUTHERN AFRICA (1) LEC. 1. Pr. WILD 2050 and WILD 3280. Provide students with knowledge of important wildlife management issues in southern Africa. Students will develop an understanding of pressing wildlife management issues in the region and learn how to apply that knowledge to future learning.

WILD 3810 STUDY ABROAD - WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT IN SOUTHERN AFRICA (3) AAB. 60. Pr. WILD 3800. Travel overseas to Swaziland and South Africa to engage in many of southern Africa's most pressing wildlife management issues.

WILD 4310 WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES (3) LEC. 1. LAB. 6. Pr. WILD 5280 or WILD 5290. Intensive study of field and laboratory techniques used to manage wildlife populations, including censusing, habitat mapping, prescribed burning, GIS and computer simulation.

WILD 4400 PROBLEM SOLVING IN WILDLIFE SCIENCES (2) LEC. 2. Pr. WILD 3280. "C" or better in WILD 3280. Applied training and tools used to solve problems in wildlife science. Spring.

WILD 4890 WILDLIFE POPULATION SCIENCE (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Pr. WILD 3280 and WILD 3750. WILD 3280 & WILD 3750 with a C or better. Principles of wildlife population dynamics, estimation of population parameters, and application of these principles and techniques to wildlife conservation and management.

WILD 4910 WILDLIFE SCIENCES SUMMER PRACTICUM (8) PRA. 8. Pr. WILD 3750 and WILD 4400 and BIOL 3060 and (FORY 3100 or BIOL 5120) and (BIOL 5740 or BIOL 5760 or FISH 5380). "C" or better in WILD 3750 and WILD 5400. Training and tools for wildlife ecology, conservation, and management, with emphasis on applied problem-solving. Summer.

WILD 4920 WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (4) PRA. 4. SU. Departmental approval. Practical job experience under joint supervision of the Internship advisor and appropriate state, federal, or private agency. Training will prepare student for potential career employment.

WILD 4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

WILD 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Topics of an undergraduate nature pertinent to wildlife sciences. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

WILD 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) AAB. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

WILD 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-6) IND. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval. Directed research and writing of honors thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

WILD 5280 AVIAN ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (2) LEC. 2. Pr. WILD 3280. With a "C or better" in WILD 3280. Intensive study of the ecology and management of selected waterfowl, galliforms, gruiforms, raptors, shorebirds, doves and pigeons, woodpeckers and neotropical migrants. Fall.

WILD 5290 MAMMALIAN ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (2) LEC. 2. Pr. WILD 3280. With a "C or better" in WILD 3280. Intensive study of the ecology and management of selected artiodactyls, rodents, lagomorphs, bats, carnivores, and herps. Spring.

WILD 5410 HUMAN-WILDLIFE CONFLICTS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 1. Pr. WILD 3280. Familiarizes students with basic philosophy, biology, and techniques related to managing negative human wildlife interactions.

WILD 5750 ANALYSIS FOR WILDLIFE SCIENCES (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. (STAT 2010 or STAT 2510 or STAT 2610 or STAT 3010). Applied training in data analysis tools commonly used in wildlife sciences. Spring.

WILD 5880 WILDLIFE HABITAT ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. WILD 3280. C or better in WILD 3280. The wildlife value, management, and restoration of common southeastern habitats.

WILD 5950 SEMINAR (1) SEM. 1. Pr. BIOL 3060 or WILD 3280 or FORY 4230. Discussion of scientific publications from a selected area in wildlife sciences. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

WILD 6280 AVIAN ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (2) LEC. 2. Pr. WILD 3280. Intensive study of the ecology and management of selected waterfowl, galliforms, gruiforms, raptors, shorebirds, doves and pigeons, woodpeckers and neotropical migrants. Fall.

WILD 6290 MAMMALIAN ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (2) LEC. 2. Pr. WILD 3280. Intensive study of the ecology and management of selected artiodactyls, rodents, lagomorphs, bats, carnivores, and herps. Fall.

WILD 6410/6416 HUMAN-WILDLIFE CONFLICTS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 1. This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic philosophy, biology, and techniques related to managing negative human wildlife interactions. Spring.

WILD 6750 ANALYSIS FOR WILDLIFE SCIENCES (4) LEC. 2. LAB. 2. Applied training in data analysis tools commonly used in wildlife sciences. Spring.

WILD 6880 WILDLIFE HABITAT ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 4. Pr. WILD 3280. "C" or better in WILD 3280. The wildlife value, management, and restoration of common southeastern habitats.

WILD 7070 UPLAND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 6. Pr. WILD 5280 or WILD 6280. Application of wildlife ecological theories and methods with emphasis on upland species and habitats. Several overnight field trips may be made. Fall.

WILD 7080 FOREST WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 4. Pr. WILD 5280 or WILD 6280. In-depth discussions into life history, biology, ecology, and management of important wildlife species of forested ecosystems. Management strategies for each species emphasized. Summer.

WILD 7100 PPLIED ECOLOGICAL MODELING (2) LEC. 2. Principles and techniques for modeling ecological systems in applied, management decision oriented contexts.

WILD 7150 ADVANCED ANALYSIS FOR ECOLOGICAL SCIENCES (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 2. Pr. STAT 7000. Applied training in advanced analytical procedures commonly used in ecological sciences including modeling of survival, reproduction, habitat selection, population growth, density-dependence, and morphometrics. Spring.

WILD 7200 WILDLIFE NUTRITIONAL ECOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Exploration of the basic nutrient requirements of free-ranging wildlife and comparison of requirements to related domestic species. Fall of odd years.

WILD 7250 WILDLIFE POPULATION ANALYSIS (3) LEC. 2. LAB. 3. Pr. WILD 6400 and WILD 7150. Estimation of survival and success rates for wildlife and fisheries populations. Theoretical approaches for model selection and population modeling. Spring, even years.

WILD 7350 WATERFOWL BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (4) LEC. 3. LAB. 3. Pr. WILD 5280 or WILD 6280. Taxonomy, biology and management of waterfowl with emphasis on North American species. Spring of odd years.

WILD 7650 INTRODUCTION TO BAYESIAN MODELING IN NATURAL RESOURCES (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Pr. WILD 7150. or instructor approval. Bayesian hierarchical modeling of ecological data. Advantages and criticisms of such models. Use of software for hierarchical modeling.

WILD 7930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND/LEC. Departmental approval. Directed studies in subject matter not covered by an existing course or to supplement knowledge gained from existing course offerings. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

WILD 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) IND. Departmental approval. Provides graduate students seeking the master's degree opportunities to work with individual wildlife science professors to investigate timely research topics. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

WILD 7990 RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-12) MST. Credit to be arranged.

WILD 8930 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) IND. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

WILD 8970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) RES. Departmental approval. Provides graduate students seeking the doctoral degree opportunities to work with individual wildlife science professors to investigate timely research topics. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

WILD 8990 RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-12) DSR.

Forestry and Wildlife Science

  • ALAVALAPATI, JANAKI, Dean
  • ALLEN, BRENDA M., Assistant Professor
  • ANDERSON, CHRIS, Associate Professor
  • ARMSTRONG, JAMES B., Professor
  • BARLOW, BECKY, Associate Professor
  • CHAPPELKA III, ARTHUR H., Professor
  • DITCHKOFF, STEPHEN S., Ireland Professor
  • ECKHARDT, LORI, Professor
  • ENEBAK, SCOTT A., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
  • FAN, ZHAOFEI, Associate Professor
  • GALLAGHER, THOMAS V., Professor
  • GITZEN, ROBERT A., Assistant Professor
  • GRAND, J. BARRY, Professor
  • GULSBY, WILLIAM, Assistant Professor
  • KALIN, LATIF, Professor
  • KENNEY, JODIE R., Director, Student Services
  • KUMAR, SAJJIV , Assistant Professor
  • KUSH, JOHN, Research Fellow
  • LOEWENSTEIN, EDWARD F., Associate Professor
  • LOEWENSTEIN, NANCY, Research Fellow
  • MAGGARD, ADAM, Assistant Professor
  • MARTIN, JOEL S., Director, Solon Dixon Forestry Education Center
  • MCGOWAN, CONOR, Assistant Research Professor
  • MORSE, WAYDE, Associate Professor
  • NADEL, RYAN, Assistant Research Professor
  • PAN, SUSAN, Assistant Professor
  • PERESIN, SOLEDAD, Assistant Professor
  • SAMUELSON, LISA J., Luce Professor
  • SHEPARD, JAMES P., Professor
  • SMIDT, MATHEW F., Professor
  • SMITH, MARK, Professor
  • STEURY, TODD, Associate Professor
  • TEETER, LAWRENCE D., Professor
  • TIAN, HANQIN, Solon Dixon Professor
  • VIA, BRIAN, Associate Professor
  • ZHANG, DAOWEI, Alumni and George Peake Professor
  • ZHANG, YAOQI, Professor
  • ZOHDY, SARAH, Assistant Professor