School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture

The Bachelor of Architecture degree is awarded upon the completion of the five-year curriculum. Qualified students may elect to pursue concurrently a second bachelor of interior architecture degree.

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a pre-requisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a six, three or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, that when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the pre- professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. Auburn's next accreditation visit for the architecture program is in 2017.

Auburn University, School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program: Bachelor of Architecture (159 credits). The four-year pre-professional Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design is not a professionally accredited degree.

Auburn University is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

Students are encouraged to work at an architect’s office, on a construction site or in another approved professional endeavor prior to their fourth year.

The bachelor of interior architecture degree program offers a holistic approach to design that focuses on the relationship between interior and exterior space. Interior Architecture students develop enhanced critical thinking abilities in relation to the construction of space, progressive materiality, sustainability, and representation. Auburn has integrated Interior Architecture and Architecture in this unique program resulting in the granting of two degrees upon completion of the fifth year of study. It is not possible to get the undergraduate degree in interior architecture without the dual Architecture professional degree. Architecture students must apply separately to the Interior Architecture Program through a competitive application process. The graduate who receives a bachelor of interior architecture degree and a bachelor of architecture degree is a person trained in interior architecture and architecture who is qualified to sit for an Architectural License Exam after completing IDP and then sit for the NCDIQ Exam for Interiors, based on a transcript review. See advisor for details.

Architecture Academic Standards and Policies

Enrollment in the second year studios is limited and eligibility for acceptance to Architecture and Interior Architecture is based on performance in courses in the first year of the model curriculum. The Architecture Program offers two options for completing the Pre-Architecture first year of the model curriculum: the Foundation Unit Studio sequence and the Summer Design Studio sequence. Placement of Pre-Architecture students into either of these entry sequences is determined by an Architecture Program committee. Information regarding the entry sequence placement process will be mailed to all Pre-Architecture students who have been admitted to Auburn on or before February 1 preceding fall term entry. Students not participating in the Foundation Unit Studio have the opportunity to be selected to enter the design studio sequence in the summer term after their first year of enrollment. Placement in the Foundation Unit Studio Sequence will be communicated prior to Camp War Eagle. Pre-Architecture students must receive an “S” in ARCH 1000ARCH 1010, and ARCH 1060 prior to being admitted to the ARCH 1020/ARCH 1420 course sequence. Students accepted into the Foundation Unit Studio sequence may not defer their acceptance to another academic year. Students that fail to successfully complete the fall semester studio sequence, or students not accepted into the Second Year Studio sequence at the end of the spring semester, will not be readmitted to the Foundation Unit Program. These students may elect to participate in the following Summer Design Studio session and will be required to participate in the entire summer program. Eligibility is dependent upon Summer Design criteria.

Auburn University students who successfully complete 27 hours, pass ARCH 1000, General Physics I, and Calculus I or MATH 1150, and achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.80 are eligible to be accepted into Summer Design. In the event that all available Summer Design seats are not filled based on the stated criteria, the committee may opt to fill the remaining seats based on academic performance of the applicants. Summer Design Studio sequence is divided into two sessions. During the course of the first session each student’s work is periodically ranked relative to her/his peers. At the end of the first session the students with the highest rank-in-class are accepted into Session Two, subject to available space. Students not accepted to the Second Year Studio may elect to retake the entire sequence of courses during the following Summer Design Session if they meet the admission criteria or they may elect to change majors.

Admission to the Second Year Studio sequence is predicated on the receipt of a grade of C or better in both ARCH 1020 and ARCH 1420. The Grade Adjustment Policy may not be used to progress to Second Year Studio.

In the event a grade of D or F is received in any required course in the major, a review is required for continuance in the program. Based on the outcome of this review, a student may be required to repeat the course or, in the case of design studios, the entire studio sequence for that respective year-level. Students receiving a second D when repeating a required course will be reviewed for continuance in the program. Similarly, a student receiving a majority of grades of C or poorer may be reviewed for continuance in the program.

Students must maintain professional standards of behavior, as outlined in the Student Policy eHandbook, at all times while on university property and while participating in school sponsored trips, events, and activities. Failure to do so may be grounds for dismissal from the program.

To proceed to the beginning sequence of design studio at third, fourth, or fifth year levels, the student must have completed all required prerequisite courses for that respective year-level, as indicated in the model curriculum. Enrollment in 3000-level BSCI courses will be limited to those students with a GPA of 2.50 or above and second-year standing in design studio.

Architecture Transfer Students

Transfer students in Architecture must meet the minimum requirements as set by Auburn University to be admitted to the College of Architecture, Design and Construction. They will be advised to begin with the Summer Design Studio Sequence. Transfer students must also meet the minimum qualifications for admission to Summer Design. Transfer students should contact CADC Student Services no later than January to request a space in the Summer Design Studio.

Foundation Unit Studio placement for transfer candidates is determined each year by the school head, the Architecture program chair, the First-Year Program coordinator and a representative from the Office of Student Services. Up to 20 percent of Foundation Unit Studio positions may be reserved for transfers each year; however, the positions will only be filled if the transferring student’s academic performance is competitive with the Foundation Unit Studio top tier ranking students from that academic year freshman admission round. It is possible to have a Foundation Unit Studio with no transfer students. Transfers accepted into the Foundation Unit Studio Sequence may not defer their acceptance to another academic year.

Transfer students from NAAB-accredited architecture programs, in addition to meeting the minimum requirements as set by Auburn University, will be required to present a portfolio of their work to the Academic Review Committee (ARC) for evaluation. The ARC will determine the level of placement in the professional architecture design studio sequence or in the pre-architecture program.

Special Opportunities for Qualified Architecture and Interior Architecture Students

During the third year of design studio students may participate in at least one of a variety of field studies opportunities aimed at enriching students’ learning experience and preparing students for professional life. These opportunities include both an international studies program with a variety of options for study abroad as well as the possibility of participation in the Rural Studio - a program based in rural west Alabama where students engage local communities via hands-on service-learning projects to help meet needs of shelter and improved quality-of-life. In addition to the required third year opportunities, students may have additional opportunities during their fifth year of study to participate in the Rural Studio or the Auburn Center for Architecture and Urban Studies - a design center in downtown Birmingham where upper-level students and faculty engage in community-centered, service-learning activities. Participation in each of these programs is limited, and students may be allowed to participate based on academic standing, available resources, and a competitive selection process.

Professional internships with practicing architects are recommended prior to the last year of study.

Architecture/Interior Architecture (ARIA) Academic Standards and Admission Policy

Participation in the Interior Architecture (ARIA) program is highly selective. Students are eligible to apply for the Interior Architecture program in the spring of their second year of the Architecture Program. This policy allows for a summer ARIA thesis class size based on yearly available faculty resources.

Spring semester applications (2nd year students)

The Interior Architecture faculty will make a selection of second year students at the end of Spring semester. Class size is based on available faculty resources and may vary each year. These students will initially participate in the ARIA-designated Third Year Fall Semester Studio. Selection of students is based primarily on the ARIA faculty-comprised Admission Board’s assessment of submitted design work. The assessment will be based on the students’ statements of intent and on three projects that demonstrate a high quality of design ability. A high quality of design ability is considered to be an indication of an applicant’s capability to take on the extra degree requirements of the ARIA degree. Additionally, it is required that accepted students have completed their appropriate studio coursework and maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA for conditional acceptance into the ARIA dual degree program. The students must maintain a minimum of a 3.0 GPA in their studio coursework during the third and fourth year to proceed into the ARIA Summer Thesis semester. If a 3.0 studio GPA is not maintained, a review by the ARIA Admissions Board will be required to determine a student’s eligibility to continue in the program. 

Architecture Courses

ARCH 1000 CAREERS IN DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION (1) LEC. 1, LST. 1. SU. Introduction to the environmental design and construction professions and the curricula in the chosen field.

ARCH 1010 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE DESIGN (5) LEC/STU. 12. Principles of visual organization, research and design process skills, and the graphic communication of form and ideas.

ARCH 1020 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE DESIGN II (5) LEC. 1, LST. 12. Pr. ARCH 1010 and ARCH 1000 and ARCH 1060. Principles of visual organization, research and design process skills, and the graphic communication of form and ideas.

ARCH 1060 VISUAL COMMUNICATION (2) LEC. 2, LEC/STU. 2. Introduction to graphic communication. Focus on developing graphic skills for the purpose of explaining form and communicating ideas via exercises in drafting, sketching, and diagramming.

ARCH 1420 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL MEDIA (2) LEC. 1, LST. 2. Pr. ARCH 1060. Introduction to the principles of 2-D and 3-D digital media and how these principles are utilized in architectural design.

ARCH 2010 STUDIO I (6) LEC. 2, LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 1020 and ARCH 1420. Basic issues of architectural design centered around the thoughtful creation of exterior and interior space. Studies of light, material, texture, proportion, scale, and site are integrated into each project.

ARCH 2020 STUDIO II (6) LEC. 2, LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 2010. Fundamental design process skills including observation, analysis, and synthesis.

ARCH 2110 HISTORY OF WORLD ARCHITECTURE I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 1020. Examination of the social determinants that shape the public beliefs and practices that produce buildings.

ARCH 2117 HONORS ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY I: HISTORY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. ARCH 1010. Examination of the social determinants that shape the public beliefs and practices that produce buildings.

ARCH 2210 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 1020. This course provides the basic knowledge and skills requisite an architect in the design of environmentally responsive buildings.

ARCH 2220 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS II (2) LEC. 2. Pr. ARCH 1020. This course provides the basic knowledge and skills requisite an architect in the design of environmentally responsive buildings.

ARCH 2600 THE ART OF ARCHITECTURE, PLACE, AND CULTURE (3) LEC. 3. The interrelationship of art, architecture, place, and culture with emphasis on the art of architecture from a global multicultural perspective. Illustrated lecture, readings, and essays.

ARCH 3010 STUDIO III (6) LEC. 2, LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 2020 and ARCH 3110. Builds on ARCH 2010 and 2020. The process of making architecture through critical inquiry and investigation. The physical, social, ethical contexts that inform the design of every building.

ARCH 3020 STUDIO IV (6) LEC. 2, AAB/LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 3010 or ARIA 3020. Builds on ARCH 3010 and adds an emphasis on the integration of construction tectonics in the development of architectural form.

ARCH 3110 HISTORY OF WORLD ARCHITECTURE II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 2110 or ARCH 2117. Introduction to key European buildings and towns from the Bronze Age to the Enlightenment. Examines how societal beliefs and practices influence the making of architecture.

ARCH 3120 HISTORY OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 3110. The history of architecture, 1850-present, with an emphasis on the rise of the modern movement in Europe and the U.S.

ARCH 3320 MATERIALS AND METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 1020. The properties and potential design function of materials used in contemporary construction, with an emphasis on foundation systems, wood, and masonry.

ARCH 3410 DESSEIN ELECTIVES (3) LEC. 3. Explorations in the art of representation. Complete descriptions of specific courses and their prerequisites are available from the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARCH 3500 SEMINAR IN METHODS AND PROCESSES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 2020. The tools and techniques available to the design professional including specific design specializations, and design methodologies. Descriptions of specific seminars are available from the School of Architecture. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

ARCH 3600 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 2020. Investigation of significant topics that present opportunities and constraints to architectural thought and practice. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

ARCH 3700 SEMINAR IN HISTORY AND THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 2010. Investigation of theories, schools or periods to examine the potential and limitations of architecture. Descriptions of specific seminars available from School of Architecture. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

ARCH 3710 SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES (3) LEC. 3.

ARCH 3800 SEMINAR IN ASPECTS OF DESIGN (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 2020. Study of aspects of architectural design, such as form, space, style, meaning, perception, culture. Descriptions of specific seminars available from the School of Architecture. Course may be repeated with change in topics.

ARCH 4010 STUDIO V (6) LEC. 2, LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 3010 or ARIA 3020 and BSCI 3400. The comprehensive design of buildings, building complexes, and spaces in an urban context. Lectures emphasize urban issues, research methods. Programming and analysis will parallel studio projects of increasing complexity.

ARCH 4020 STUDIO VI (6) LEC. 2, AAB/LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 4010 or ARIA 4020 and BSCI 3450. The design of buildings, building complexes, and spaces with emphasis on the integration of building systems and tectonic development.

ARCH 4110 HISTORY OF URBAN ARCHITECTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 2110 or ARCH 2117 and ARCH 3110. The course surveys the history of the physical and formal manifestations of the urban environment from its inception to our days.

ARCH 4320 MATERIALS AND METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 3320. Properties and potential design applications of materials used in contemporary construction, with an emphasis on steel and concrete, roofing, glass and glazing, cladding, and interior finishes.

ARCH 4500 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 3020 or ARIA 3020. Architects' legal responsibilities, frameworks of professional practice, office organization, business planning, marketing, project delivery, internship and professional ethics and leadership.

ARCH 4900 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-6) AAB. Development of an area of special interest through independent study. Evaluation of the work may be by faculty jury. School approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARCH 4910 RURAL STUDIO COMPLETION (0) LEC. Completion of construction project for ARCH 4120 Elective Studio. This studio is based in the School's remote facilities in Newbern, AL.

ARCH 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-6) LEC. 4900 Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARCH 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-6) LEC. Pr. Honors College. Departmental approval.. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ARCH 5010 STUDIO VII (6) LEC. 2, AAB/LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 4020 or ARIA 4020. Advanced problem-solving in the synthesis of previous design experiences. Development of a comprehensive design project.

ARCH 5020 THESIS STUDIO (7) LEC. 3, AAB/LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 5010 and ARCH 5990. Exploration and development of an architectural project under the direction of a faculty member.

ARCH 5100 TEACHING METHODS (1) LEC. 1.

ARCH 5240 BEING THERE (1) LEC. 1. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

ARCH 5340 METHODS IN COMMUNITY BASED LEARNING (3) LEC. 3.

ARCH 5990 INTRODUCTION TO THESIS RESEARCH (2) LEC. 2. The tools, techniques, and strategies required to select, develop, refine, write, and present a thesis argument.

ARCH 5991 THESIS RESEARCH (1) LEC. 1. Pr. ARCH 5990. Expansion on the individual thesis argument and research begun in ARCH 5990 in parallel with the development of their thesis design project in ARCH 5020.

ARCH 7010 STUDIO I: PROJECT INITIATION (6) STU. 12. Coreq. ARCH 7110 and ARCH 7210. This is the first of three sequential design studios in which the aspects of community need, context, technical systems, and building materials are explored to develop a schematic, client-driven architectural proposal.

ARCH 7020 STUDIO II: PROJECT DEVELOPMENT (6) STU. 12. Pr. ARCH 7010 and ARCH 7110 and ARCH 7210. Coreq. ARCH 7120 and ARCH 7220. This is the second of three sequential design studios in which the aspects of community need, context, technical systems, and building materials are explored to develop a client-driven architectural proposal.

ARCH 7030 STUDIO III: PROJECT COMPLETION (6) STU. 12. Pr. ARCH 7020 and ARCH 7120 and ARCH 7210. Coreq. ARCH 7130. This is the third of three sequential design studios in which the aspects of community need, context, technical systems, and building materials are explored to develop a client-driven architectural proposal.

ARCH 7110 SEMINAR IN COLLABORATIVE DESIGN METHODS AND PROCESS (3) SEM. 3. Pr. ARCH 7010 and ARCH 7210. Coreq. ARCH 7010 and ARCH 7210. Introduction to the core theories of collaboration within interdisciplinary design and construction project teams teams and community-based client groups. Students develop an understanding of the fundamentals of collaborative process design, principles negotiation, communication across disciplines, and conflict resolution.

ARCH 7120 SEMINAR IN DESIGN TECTONICS (3) SEM. 3. Pr. ARCH 7010 and ARCH 7110 and ARCH 7210. Coreq. ARCH 7220 and ARCH 7020. Co-requisite adjunct to Project Development Studio. Taught as a series of workshops, this course provides the disciplinary framework necessary to apply technical research methods when evaluating options and reconciling the implications of design development decisions across systems and scales.

ARCH 7130 PROJECT COMMUNICATIONS (3) SEM. 3. Pr. ARCH 7020 and ARCH 7120 and ARCH 7220. Coreq. ARCH 7030. This course is delivered as a co-requisite adjunct to Project Completion Studio (Studio III). This course provides the disciplinary framework necessary to develop all project documentation required for project construction, delivery, record keeping, as well as future research and analysis.

ARCH 7210 EXECUTIVE ISSUES I (3) SEM. 3. Coreq. ARCH 7010 and ARCH 7110. Co-requisite adjunct to Project Initiation Studio (Studio I). Taught as a series "overlay" lectures and workshops. Provides the disciplinary framework to apply case study research methods when evaluating options and reconciling the implications of schematic design decisions the implications of schematic design decisions

ARCH 7220 EXECUTIVE ISSUES II (3) SEM. 3. Coreq. ARCH 7020 and ARCH 7120. Co-requisite adjunct to Project Development Studio (Studio II). Taught as a series "overlay" lectures and workshops. Provides the disciplinary framework necessary to apply case study research methods when evaluating options and reconciling the implications of design development decisions across systems/scales.

Community Planning Courses

CPLN 5000 HISTORY AND THEORY OF URBAN FORM (3) LEC. 3. The vocabulary and historical development of urban design, focusing on the environmental and cultural forces that design, shape, build, and redevelop the urban fabric.

CPLN 5010 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Examines the basic principles of community design and planning, and introduces areas of specialization with the professional of planning.

CPLN 5020 CITIES, PLANNING, AND CLIMATE CHANGE (3) SEM. 3. This course teaches about connections that climate has with urban processes; how cities are affected by climate change, impact of local land use and transportation decisions, and Climate Action Planning at local level including GHG inventory, adaptation and mitigation strategies.

CPLN 5040 LAND USE PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Students will develop the critical and analytical skills, as well as analyze relevant literature, that will arm them with the necessary tools in order to implement, administer, and analyze a wide range of plans.

CPLN 5050 LAND AND URBAN ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Examines the historical development and contemporary functioning of cities from an economic perspective, with focus on land use and transportation.

CPLN 5060 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. This topical seminar addresses issues related to transportation and mobility within the context of sustainable, healthy cities. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester.

CPLN 5070 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Addresses issues related to land use, environmental impact and policy, and sustainability. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5070 or CPLN 6070.

CPLN 5080 AFFORDABLE HOUSING PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. This topical seminar addresses planning issues related to housing and neighborhood conservation. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5080/6080.

CPLN 5090 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Planning issues related to community and economic development content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5090 or CPLN 6090.

CPLN 5100 URBAN DESIGN METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Techniques and methodologies in urban design problem- solving and strategies for implementation.

CPLN 5110 SUSTAINABLE URBANISM AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT (3) SEM. 3. This course covers growth management in the United States. It covers growth management programs, the causes of sprawl, the costs and benefits of sprawl and growth management, and solutions to managing growth.

CPLN 5120 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (3) SEM. 3. This course covers federal, state, and local environmental policy-making and governance. It discusses how planners, policy-makers, and government officials implement existing environmental policies, how environmental policies are created, theories of environmental policy, and the new and emerging methods of environmental policy.

CPLN 5400 PRESERVATION PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Planning for the preservation, restoration, conservation, adaptive reuse of historic buildings, sites and districts within the comprehensive planning process.

CPLN 5450 PLANNING HISTORY AND THEORY (3) LEC. 3. This course provides future practitioners with the theoretical and historical tools and knowledge to effective in the planning field. May count either CPLN 5450 or CPLN 6450.

CPLN 5460 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. Basic concepts of geographic information systems and digital planning applications. Emphasis on spatial decision-making and visualization of planning scenarios. May count with CPLN 5460 or CPLN 6460.

CPLN 5970 SPECIAL TOPICS: CURRENT ISSUES IN PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Elective seminar addresses current issues in planning. May count either CPLN 5970 or CPLN 6970.

CPLN 6000 HISTORY AND THEORY OF URBAN FORM (3) LEC. 3. The vocabulary and historical development of urban design, focusing on the environmental and cultural forces that design, shape, build, and redevelop the urban fabric.

CPLN 6010 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Examines the basic principles of community design and planning, and introduces areas of specialization with the professional of planning.

CPLN 6020 CITIES, PLANNING, AND CLIMATE CHANGE (3) SEM. 3. This course focuses on connections that climate has with urban processes, climate action planning at local level, compiling greenhouse gas inventory, climate adaptation and mitigation strategies, and building sustainable and resilient cities.

CPLN 6040 LAND USE PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Students will develop the critical and analytical skills, as well as analyze relevant literature, that will arm them with the necessary tools in order to implement, administer, and analyze a wide range of plans.

CPLN 6050 LAND AND URBAN ECONOMICS (3) LEC. 3. Examines the historical development and contemporary functioning of cities from an economic perspective, with focus on land use and transportation.

CPLN 6060 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. Addresses issues related to transportation and mobility within the context of sustainable, healthy cities. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5060 or CPLN 6060.

CPLN 6070 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Addresses issues related to land use, environmental impact and policy, and sustainability. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5070 or CPLN 6070.

CPLN 6080 AFFORDABLE HOUSING PLANNING AND POLICY (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Addresses planning issues related to housing and neighborhood conservation. Specific course content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5080 or CPLN 6080.

CPLN 6090 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) SEM. 3. Program approval for ABM students and non-majors. Planning issues related to community and economic development. Content may vary from semester to semester. May count either CPLN 5090 or CPLN 6090.

CPLN 6100 URBAN DESIGN METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Techniques and methodologies in urban design problem- solving and strategies for implementation.

CPLN 6400 PRESERVATION PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Planning for the preservation, restoration, conservation and adaptive reuse of historic buildings, sites and districts within the comprehensive planning process.

CPLN 6450 PLANNING HISTORY AND THEORY (3) LEC. 3. This course provides future practitioners with the theoretical and historical tools and knowledge to effective in the planning field. May count either CPLN 5450 or CPLN 6450.

CPLN 6460 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY (3) LEC. 3. Program approval for non-majors and ABM students. Basic concepts of geographic information systems and digital planning applications. Emphasis on spatial decision-making and visualization of planning scenarios. May count with CPLN 5460 or CPLN 6460.

CPLN 6970 SPECIAL TOPICS: CURRENT ISSUES IN PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Elective seminar addresses current issues in planning. May count either CPLN 5970 or CPLN 6970.

CPLN 7200 URBAN DESIGN STUDIO (3) STU. 3. Basic principles of urban design are explored, with an emphasis on the planner's role in shaping the built environment. Exercises and projects provide hands-on experience in making good urban places.

CPLN 7240 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR PLANNING (3) LEC. 3. Development of working knowledge of planning techniques such as data collection, basic statistics, demographic analysis, economic analysis, social research, transportation, and evaluation.

CPLN 7430 LAND USE LAW (3) LEC. 3. This course covers three key elements of the planning profession: ethics, law and plan implementation.

CPLN 7600 SYNTHESIS STUDIO I (3) STU. 3. Pr. CPLN 7400. Serves as the primary opportunity for the student to demonstrate their competency in community design and planning by translating knowledge into action through the development of a practical plan.

CPLN 7610 SYNTHESIS STUDIO 2 (3) STU. 3. This class is the second required plan-making studio in the Master of Community Planning Program. Synthesis Studio 2 is the second in a two-semester series of classes that will critically consider a real-world planning project involving a city. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CPLN 7800 SYNTHESIS PROJECT (6) AAB/STU. 12. Departmental approval. Demonstration of competence in community planning and design through production of an original, comprehensive project that integrates knowledge and experience in addressing a complex planning and design problem.

CPLN 7920 PLANNING INTERNSHIP (1-6) AAB/INT. Departmental approval. Professional experience in public, private or non-profit planning or planning-related agency.

Environmental Design Courses

ENVD 2000 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 1000 or INDD 1120 or BSCI 1100. Or ENVD major. Core knowledge of design and construction disciplines and business practices related to human-designed environments. Includes national and global perspectives and focus on interdisciplinary studies.

ENVD 2010 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN AND DESIGN METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Introduces students to the importance of design and basic design methods.

ENVD 2040 DESIGN, INVENTION AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Role of design and invention in society from the ancient to the contemporary world.

ENVD 2100 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN WORKSHOP I (6) LAB. 6. Pr. ENVD 2000. Departmental approval. Focus on general technical skill set for environmental design foundations. Digital media introduction, structure and fabrication techniques, design communication development.

ENVD 2200 READINGS IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (3) SEM. 3. Investigates the idea of landscape through a range of texts, images, and built works that have helped form, and continue to shape, our understanding of the landscape. First year of B.ENVD.

ENVD 3000 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES II (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENVD 2100. Departmental approval. Advanced knowledge of design, construction and planning disciplines and practice. National/global environmental design issues, focus on interdisciplinary concepts, hybrid practices, & sustainability.

ENVD 3100 CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND RESEARCH METHODS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ENVD 3000. Departmental approval. Civic engagement and research methods for environmental design. This is a research prep course to develop research methods, projects, and community partnerships for summer ENVD 4100 workshop capstone.

ENVD 3200 SYSTEMS IN BUILT ENVIRONMENT I (3) SEM. 2.5. Pr. ENVD 2100. Focus on research of different systems in built environments, and different research methods that can be used in design in order to understand and represent them.

ENVD 3300 SYSTEMS IN BUILT ENVIRONMENT II (3) SEM. 2.5. Pr. ENVD 2100. ENVD 3300 is a course that focuses on application of research from design and construction disciplines in built environment through testing and prototyping, thus exploring potential for application in a larger context.

ENVD 4000 ELEMENTS OF URBAN DESIGN (3) SEM. 3. Pr. ENVD 2100. ENVD 4000 provides environmental design students with an introduction to urban design theories, methods and processes through combination of lectures and hands-on instruction.

ENVD 4010 ELEMENTS OF DESIGN THINKING AND COMMUNICATION (3) LEC. 3. This is a 3-credit hour class that builds design communication skills through a series of projects that utilize both hand-rendering and digital media.

ENVD 4100 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN WORKSHOP II - CAPSTONE (6) LEC. 6. Pr. ENVD 3100. Environmental design knowledge & technical skill set using principles of collaboration, leadership & effectiveness training, hands-on experience, civic engagement & design communication skills.

ENVD 4500 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (3) SEM. 3. Pr. ENVD 3000. This course will enable students to learn elements of professional communication; create persuasive portfolio of their work; and to seek, and prepare for, internship and job opportunities.

ENVD 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (3) LEC. 3. Topics include: digital production, portfolio making and design thinking. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENVD 5030 STUDIES IN DESIGN THINKING AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3) SEM. 3. Study and application of design and innovation thinking in entrepreneurship, with a special emphasis on social entrepreneurship. May count either ENVD 5030 or ENVD 6030.

Interior Architecture Courses

ARIA 2150 ELEMENTS OF INTERIOR ARCH I (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 2020. The theory of design principles, aesthetics and concepts. Graphic drawings and models of interior spaces explored. Projects outside of class.

ARIA 2160 ELEMENTS OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE II (3) LEC. 3. The theory of design principles, aesthetics and concepts. Graphic drawings and models of interior spaces explored. Projects outside of class.

ARIA 3020 STUDIO 4A INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE (6) LEC. 2, LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 2020. Parallels Architecture Studio 4, but with an emphasis on interior architecture with exploration of detail and accommodation.

ARIA 4020 STUDIO 6A INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE (6) LEC. 2, LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 3020 and ARCH 3320 and (ARCH 2110 or ARCH 2117) and BSCI 3400. Parallels Architecture Studio 6, with emphasis on the development of interior architecture and spaces within an urban context. Consideration will be given to adaptive reuse.

ARIA 4030 INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE THESIS (6) LEC. 3, LST. 10. Pr. ARCH 4020. Coreq. ARIA 4080. Interior design project of the student's choice, under the direction of a faculty member.

ARIA 4080 INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE THESIS RESEARCH (2) LEC. 2. Pr. ARCH 4020. Research and writing of thesis documents, to include programming, site, and case studies.

ARIA 4450 INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (2) LEC. 2. Pr. ARCH 4020. Prepares student to enter professional office with an understanding of the skills, concepts and technical knowledge expected.

ARIA 4680 HISTORY AND THEORY OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. ARCH 4020. The theory and history of interior spaces, their social, material, and aesthetic development and their artifacts.

Landscape Architecture Courses

LAND 5110 BASIC LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (6) STU. 12. Landscape architectural design studio emphasizing research, planning and design problems at neighborhood to community scales.

LAND 5130 STUDIO I: FOUNDATION STUDIO (5) STU. 5. Teaches foundational skills (drawing, modeling, and multiple representational skills) that are necessary to progress into future design studios.

LAND 5131 STUDIO I: FIELD STUDIES (1) FLD. 1. Departmental approval. Field studies and travel related to studio.

LAND 5140 HISTORY I: LANDSCAPE MODERNISM (3) LEC. 3. Investigates issues in the modern history of landscape architecture, from early twentieth century to the present day.

LAND 5150 CONSTRUCTION I (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Fundamental skills needed to analyze, understand, and manipulate landform with respect to form, grading and drainage.

LAND 5160 GRAPHIC STUDIES I (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Develops the use of different drawing and presentation techniques to clearly communication design ideas, specifically by means of sketching, watercolors, colored pencils and drafting techniques.

LAND 5170 GRAPHIC STUDIES II (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Graphic and communication theories and skills in a variety of media. Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign and AutoCAD.

LAND 5210 URBAN HOUSING STUDIO (6) STU. 12. Spatial/formal qualities of multi-unit housing utilizing the wealth of housing typologies erected in North America.

LAND 5230 STUDIO II (5) STU. 5. Iterative design processes that project and test design scenarios, refining propositions based on multiple performance criteria in relation to site specificity and community context. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5230 or 6230.

LAND 5231 FIELD STUDIES II (1) FLD. 1. Field studies and travel related to studio. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5231 or 6231

LAND 5240 HISTORY II: LANDSCAPE TIMELINES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LAND 5140. Major transformation in the broad history of landscape architecture from antiquity to the end of the nineteenth century, with particular attention to canonical gardens and landscapes. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5240 or 6240.

LAND 5250 CONSTRUCTION II (2) LEC. 2. Fundamentals of design detailing of site assemblies, with emphasis on material research and construction methods. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5250 or 6250.

LAND 5260 GRAPHIC STUDIES III (3) SEM. 3. Pr. LAND 5150. Departmental approval. Fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems are used to create visual frameworks for gathering, interpreting, and sharing spatial data in landscape architecture practice.

LAND 5270 PLANT SPATIALITY (2) LEC. 2. Studies of innovative design with plants, exploring issues plant association, strata, and spatiality. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5270 or 6270.

LAND 5280 LANDSCAPE ELEMENTS: EARTH, FIRE AND WATER (3) LEC. 3. Introduces students to the basic elements used in the design of the built landscape.

LAND 5310 INDEPENDENT STUDY THESIS (6) STU. 12. Departmental approval. Extensive exploration and development of a landscape architecture issue of the students choice beyond the level associated with entry to the profession. Level-III standing;

LAND 5330 STUDIO III (5) LEC. 5. Pr. (LAND 5230 or LAND 6230) or (P/C LAND 5331 or P/C LAND 6331). Departmental approval. Investigates eco-cultural relationships between regional, metropolitan and urban scales with emphasis on physical and social flows.

LAND 5331 FIELD STUDIES III (1) FLD. 1. SU. Pr. (LAND 6230 or LAND 5230) or (P/C LAND 5330 or P/C LAND 6330). Departmental approval. Field studies and travel related to studio.

LAND 5340 URBAN STUDIES I: AMERICAN URBAN LANDSCAPES (3) SEM. 3. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. This course explores the evolution of the American landscape, its current conditions, and prospects. Students learn to read the landscape, reflect on its transformation and become responsible critics.

LAND 5350 CONSTRUCTION III: HYDROLOGIES (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. This course emphasizes stormwater research, planning and design. Students learn technical skills and design techniques needed to construct projects with environmental integrity and aesthetic appeal.

LAND 5360 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS I: URBAN ECOLOGIES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. This course provides an overview of natural ecological systems and how they can be preserved or restored to enhance human and ecological health through sustainable design.

LAND 5370 PLANT EPHEMERALITY (2) LEC. 2. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. Studies of innovative design with plants, exploring issues of plant phenology and dynamic lifecycle conditions.

LAND 5430 URBAN THEORY (3) LEC. 3. An introduction to contemporary theories of urban design, geography, and cultural theory using case study methods.

LAND 5500 LAND ETHICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (3) LEC. 3. Explores the ethical relationship of man and nature.

LAND 5510 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING STUDIO (6) STU. 12. Natural systems analysis as a basis for site planning and large scale facilities design. Level-II standing.

LAND 5520 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO (6) STU. 12. Pr. LAND 5110. A continuation of the basic design studio emphasizing research, planning, and design problems at community to regional scales.

LAND 5540 HISTORY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE II (3) LEC. 3. Explores the built landscape from the 17th Century to the present including designs in America, Europe and Asia.

LAND 5590 INDEPENDENT STUDY THESIS (6) STU. 12. A major integrative investigation of a focused problem area, defined and pursued by the student under the direction of a faculty member.

LAND 6130 STUDIO I: FOUNDATION STUDIO (5) AAB/STU. 5. Teaches foundational skills (drawing, modeling, and multiple representational skills) that are necessary to progress into future design studios.

LAND 6131 STUDIO I: FIELD STUDIES (1) AAB/FLD. 1. Departmental approval. Field studies and travel related to studio.

LAND 6140 HISTORY I: LANDSCAPE MODERNISM (3) LEC. 3. Investigates issues in the modern history of landscape architecture, from early twentieth century to the present day.

LAND 6150 CONSTRUCTION I (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Fundamental skills needed to analyze, understand, and manipulate landform with respect to form, grading and drainage.

LAND 6160 GRAPHIC STUDIES I (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Develops the use of different drawing and presentation techniques to clearly communication design ideas, specifically by means of sketching, watercolors, colored pencils and drafting techniques.

LAND 6170 GRAPHIC STUDIES II (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Graphic and communication theories and skills in a variety of media. Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign and AutoCAD.

LAND 6230 STUDIO II (5) STU. 5. Iterative design processes that project and test design scenarios, refining propositions based on multiple performance criteria in relation to site specificity and community context. Departmental approval. May either LAND 5230 or 6230.

LAND 6231 FIELD STUDIES II (1) FLD. 1. Field studies and travel related to studio. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5231 or 6231.

LAND 6240 HISTORY II: LANDSCAPE TIMELINES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LAND 6140. Major transformation in the broad history of landscape architecture from antiquity to the end of the nineteenth century, with particular attention to canonical gardens and landscapes. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5240 or 6240.

LAND 6250 CONSTRUCTION II (2) LEC. 2. Fundamentals of design detailing of site assemblies, with emphasis on material research and construction methods. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5250 or 6250.

LAND 6260 GRAPHIC STUDIES III (3) SEM. 3. Departmental approval. Fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems are used to create visual frameworks for gathering, interpreting, and sharing spatial data in landscape architecture practice.

LAND 6270 PLANT SPATIALITY (2) LEC. 2. Studies of innovative design with plants, exploring issues plant association, strata, and spatiality. Departmental approval. May count either LAND 5270 or 6270.

LAND 6330 STUDIO III (5) LEC. 5. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. Coreq. LAND 6331 and LAND 5331. Investigates eco-cultural relationships between regional, metropolitan and urban scales with emphasis on physical and social flows.

LAND 6331 FIELD STUDIES III (1) FLD. 1. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. Coreq. LAND 6330 and LAND 5330. Field studies and travel related to studio.

LAND 6340 URBAN STUDIES I: AMERICAN URBAN LANDSCAPES (3) SEM. 3. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. This course explores the evolution of the American landscape, its current conditions, and prospects. Students learn to read the landscape, reflect on its transformation and become responsible critics.

LAND 6350 CONSTRUCTION III: HYDROLOGIES (2) LEC. 1. LAB. 2. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. This course emphasizes stormwater research, planning and design. Students learn technical skills and design techniques needed to construct projects with environmental integrity and aesthetic appeal.

LAND 6360 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS I: URBAN ECOLOGIES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. This course provides an overview of natural ecological systems and how they can be preserved or restored to enhance human and ecological health through sustainable design.

LAND 6370 PLANT EPHEMERALITY (2) LEC. 2. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. Studies of innovative design with plants, exploring issues of plant phenology and dynamic lifecycle conditions.

LAND 6430 URBAN THEORY (3) LEC. 3. An introduction to contemporary theories of urban design, geography, and cultural theory using case study methods.

LAND 7130 STUDIO IV (5) AAB/STU. 5. Departmental approval. Investigates design strategies and techniques for generating new resilient cultural and environmental practices within complex dynamic conditions.

LAND 7131 FIELD STUDIES (1) AAB/FLD. 1. Pr. P/C LAND 5230. Departmental approval. Coreq. LAND 7130. Field studies and travel related to studio.

LAND 7140 URBAN STUDIES II: GLOBAL URBANISM (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Examines the major global drivers of urban change, contemporary theories of international urban design, geography and cultural theory.

LAND 7170 PLANT FUNCTIONALITY (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Studies of innovative design with plants, exploring the performance of plants and introducing the standards of the nursery industry.

LAND 7180 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS II: REGENERATIVE TECHNOLOGIES (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Introduces issues of land contamination and explores remediative and regenerative technologies as design strategies towards new productive futures.

LAND 7231 STUDIO V: THESIS (6) STU. 6. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. The first part of a two-semester research studio which involves creating a new body of work within a theoretical context and then critically appraising this work and its theoretical framework.

LAND 7232 STUDIO V: TERMINAL (6) STU. 6. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. This is a directed studio that will ask students to look at a large site within a city and design an individual intervention that reflects the goals and objectives of that studio.

LAND 7240 THEORIES AND PRACTICES (3) SEM. 3. Departmental approval. This is a reading, writing, and discussion seminar that examines the idea that the development of a democratic, civic, diverse social ecology can create more resilient and sustainable communities.

LAND 7250 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (2) LEC. 2. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. Investigation of landscape architectural issues and topics that can be undertaken by means of design, and the development of methodologies and techniques appropriate to such investigation.

LAND 7280 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS III: REGIONAL ECOLOGIES (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. This lecture/field laboratory course examines and critiques current landscape problems/crises of multiple scales and scrutinizes the public and private response to these problems.

LAND 7331 STUDIO VI: THESIS (6) STU. 12. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. A continuance of the self-directed design research project that students began in Studio V Thesis, culminating in a public review and exhibition.

LAND 7332 STUDIO VI: TERMINAL (6) STU. 6. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. A directed studio that will ask students to look at a large site within a city and design an individual intervention that reflects the goals and objectives of that studio.

LAND 7340 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. LAND 5230 or LAND 6230. Departmental approval. This course surveys the development and ethics of the profession of landscape architecture and presents an overview of the business and practice of the profession.

LAND 7350 LANDSCAPE COMPUTER MODELING (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Three dimensional and dynamic systems modeling.

LAND 7410 SEMINAR ON HISTORY AND THEORY (3) LEC. 3. Departmental approval. Opportunity for students to further develop expertise expertise through supervised, independent course study or pursue an area of interest that may not be covered in the current curriculum.

LAND 7420 SEMINAR ON COMMUNITY OUTREACH (3) SEM. 3. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. Opportunity for students to further develop expertise through supervised, independent course study or pursue an area of interest that may not be covered in the current curriculum.

LAND 7430 SEMINAR ON HYDROLOGY (2) SEM. 2. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. Opportunity for students to further develop expertise through supervised, independent course study or pursue an area of interest that may not be covered in the current curriculum.

LAND 7440 SEMINAR ON LANDSCAPE COMMUNICATION (3) SEM. 3. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. Opportunity for students to further develop expertise through supervised, independent course study or pursue an area of interest that may not be covered in the current curriculum.

LAND 7450 SEMINAR ON LANDSCAPE RESEARCH (2) SEM. 2. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. Opportunity for students to further develop expertise through supervised, independent course study or pursue an area of interest that may not be covered in the current curriculum.

LAND 7530 DESIGN BUILD FELLOWSHIP (3-6) LEC/PRA. Pr. LAND 5230. Departmental approval. The design investigation and construction/installation of a landscape proposal. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

LAND 7900 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) AAB. An individual student can pursue an area of research beyond the required curriculum. Departmental approval; MLA II standing. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

LAND 7960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (2) LEC. 2. Departmental approval. Investigation of landscape architectural issues and topics that can be undertaken by means of design, and the development of methodologies and techniques appropriate to such investigation.

LAND 7970 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-6) AAB. Groups of student work with a specific faculty on a special topic in an area of interest. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. ADDITIONAL PREREQUISITES: Departmental approval; MLA I standing.

LAND 7990 DESIGN THESIS I (6) LEC. 6.

LAND 7991 DESIGN THESIS II (8) LEC. 8.

LAND 7992 RESEARCH SUMMARY (1) LEC. 1.

School of Arch/Plan/Land Arch

  • GUERTAL, ELIZABETH A., Professor
  • HULUKA, GOBENA, Associate Professor
  • JOHNSON, KATHERINE, Visiting Instructor
  • LANGHAM, JUDD, Visiting Instructor
  • LEMME, GARY D., Extension Director and Professor
  • LI, STEVE, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist
  • MASK, PAUL L., Professor and Assistant Dean, Extension
  • MEYER, DARRELL, Visiting Instructor
  • MILLER, JUSTIN, Associate Professor
  • MONKS, CHARLES D., Professor and Extension Specialist
  • MORGAN, RANDY, Visiting Instructor
  • ROLLINS, FROST, Visiting Instructor
  • SHENEFELT, BUD, Visiting Instructor
  • VAUGHN, RANDAL, Visiting Instructor